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Parma Ham's gone mouldy

Parma's Tactics Masterclass 16

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There are far more questions than answers at this early stage though there are the outlines of shapes and intended approaches visible.

There is often a notable difference between what is intended and what is produced, so our current vision is limited to the major themes and how they should work.

Today''s game offered us a glimpse into some aspects of the future that we might not have expected as a result of our dominance of possession. The first half in particular - with an incredible (hitherto unseen?) 75% possession rate - demonstrated some coaching patterns that are designed to repeat on an ongoing basis.

A number of structural issues have been confronted - they may understandably not be polished gems or fully formed strategies on the pitch - which is excellent to see and offers hope in the medium term.

The importance of the CDM role and the space including and around the deep-lying defensive pivot is fully embraced under the new system.

Reed is a natural fit for the position and is as good as we can realistically expect at this point in time. He is tidy in possession, diligent, a tenacious tackler and two occasions today highlighted two key skills that we have been sorely lacking (by anyone who has played in the area). At 0-2 a midfield break burst beyond our midfield line, with Lateral Central defenders stretched and Zimmerman isolated and on the turn. Not only did Reed produce a highly professional foul, from the other side of the referee - making no attempt to play the ball - he recognised quickly when and why it was necessary. I cannot stress how crucial this skill is, we have spent 18 months not doing it - and worse - not being mentally aware of when it would have been necessary. This lack of game intelligence is absolutely fatal at the higher level.(As an aside, quite how he escaped a booking is beyond me. Poor refereeing, but very much highlighting playing and refereeing differences in England and Europe. It would have been a yellow and a half in Europe, with all baying for red, knowing the strategic importance of the deliberate move. Here nobody blinked, even in red.)

Secondly, later in the game, though still at 0-2, am inside right attacking midfield channel opened up for Reed, which he rightly drove into. Upon releasing the ball in an advanced position, a mental and tactical runner band pulled him sharply back into the right area of the pitch for his role (he sprinted), regardless of the next attacking phase. Really good, important structural play. He still offers an out ball, though any puppy-ball-chasing tendencies (à la Tettey) are thoroughly outgrained. Good.

James Maddison - a remarkable promotion in a short space of time - is a pivotal player in the new system. He is entrusted as the playmaker and time-keeper of the side already. Setting the tempo, being the permanent carousel option, dropping deep alongside Reed, who in turn will drop between any of the centre backs to receive or retain possession (including Gunn whenever necessary). Along with Naismith (today), he provides a permanent option to whoever receives the first ball and then continues to circulate and provide a 5 yard option. It almost appears that recipients are expected to feed him on demand, regardless of the tightness of situation and regardless as to whether his touch must be brief and returned, just keep the ball - and of course the opposition - moving.

Naismith is a willing, diligent and vocal foil. He is an organiser, a responsibility-taker and someone who takes up good positions without the ball. Previous Masterclasses identified him as an option in a deeper midfield role and this suits his character and desire to be useful and involved. His skills are not all silky however and his teammates will neeed to avoid confusing him with Maddison in tight central situations, his game is simple and suitable, though his touch less featherlight and he does not spin out of cul-de-sacs. He must also be wary of drifting into attacking areas without paying attention to the spaces behind him and calculating the likely odds of success of the attacking play. His role is not at all cost-free tactically now, he must adhere to Station to mitigate counters.

The shape and operation of this central midfield axis is disciplined, organised and strong however. Games are won and lost here and this is a great positive for us. We have a good blend, shape and range of options outside of the Reed role, without him it is not clear to me who from the current squad would then fill the significant tactical void.

The 3-5-2 shape and our intended pattern of play - and I am surprised to see it operate as a fairly flat forward 2, rather than a 3-5-1-1 around a fulcrum 9 - suits some players well, though shows up weaknesses in others.

Martin looks very comfortable in the shape and his role is ideally suited to him. He moves into the 3/4 defensive areas - and indeed presses into full back spaces willingly. His movements are fluid and natural and he is a round peg in a round hole on the right side of a 3. I suspect Farke will look at his early season tendency to get squared up when one-to-one and plant his feet with wide forward driving at him from the wings (a front foot orthodox boxer''s stance, then a crab-like gradual shutting of the space would be textbook), but his natural playing tendencies suit the shape well and he is positive, confident and progressive in possession of the ball, which is a fundamental requirement to operate in the new system. Lateral central defenders must split wide and early, receive balls quickly from the goalkeeper and shovel it on early with as few touches as possible. Any shutting down of the wing back spaces requires a fast chain of passes of passes out to the opposite side, with an emphasis on speed of ball movement via ''messages on the ball'' (playing it in to the space of where the player should move to, in order him to be able to make the next pass, which is inherent and ''messaged'' from the previous one. Or if you prefer: The first passer is passing to the second player in such a way as to show him what pass the third player needs) even in the centre back areas.

Zimmerman is stepping up in class considerably from his previously level. The Championship can see big, strong, limited sides like Sunderland lunge forward in numbers and overwhelm new defenders used to time on the ball and highly structured, lower-risk, less hung-ho attacking movements seen in much of Europe. Franke looked uncomfortable with these oppressive bursts throughout. His use of the ball was also a little pedestrian and predictable. A sense of trying to play too safe, too careful, paralysis-through-analysis. Early days of course. Klose will be ideally suited if we can afford to keep him and he is motivated to do so (both significant question marks).

Whilst Maddison was probably the best player on the pitch, with nice deep possession and a real sense of influence of the pattern and tempo of the game, Norwich as a side lacked the ''Carrick pass'' today, something this system is going to have to find a version of to penetrate teams that sit back. This is a ball that quickly and sharply links deep midfield to a receiving forward, number ten or high-playing number 8.

This was very much where our game plan fell down today. It is not an easy pass, nor is the job done once it''s received, though Watkins and Jerome will have to do vastly better at moving into these areas, drifting away from centre backs to the sides of deeper minfielders, and then linking together or finding wider players moving toward them (and then driving into the wider channels outside opposition midfielders and attacking spaces between centre backs and full backs).

We lacked weapons today. The question remains what our weapons are and where and how we can most effectively deploy them. Masterclass-defined weapons are players that hurt the opposition shape, tactics and set up and make them change, adjust tactics or take risks ignoring the issue.

It may surprise some, but Wildschut is rightly identified as a weapon. The question is - as with many flawed weapons at our level - can we develop and effectively employ his weapons without exposing to a greater degree his weaknesses, and can the shape and tactics of the side accommodate all of this (in effect: is it worth it anyway?). Wildschut can run past players for fun. A huge weapon. He takes players out of the game and can easily create overloads it players can get up with him. This is great, but he is a head-down runner and is relatively unaware of angles around him having broken into space. His final-ball decision-making is poor and he often appears to not make any decision at all in such situations. As Farke has pointed out, we must be a breeding ground and coach, nurture and improve such assets (we cannot buy polished diamonds), though in the early stages it may be worth encouraging him to shoot early having beaten a man and just get strikers to follow in. It may be that he is a fast player with a brain that freezes when confronted with options, less thinking and simpler instructions may be to his advantage. He is not a natural wing-back however and his driving and attacking orders are only possible because a responsible, reliable operator like Martin will cover for him (critics note: it is also what players can do to facilitate and extract skills from others, not merely what actions they perform themselves).

The flat forward 2 is hitherto based on hard work and filling some defensive passing-angle-spaces to reduce counters at source. This is fine, though neither Jerome nor Watkins looked remotely penetrative today in this set up. They both had very poor games, with unnecessarily poor touches and somewhat leaden-looking channel running , even when presented with spaces down the sides of the centre backs. There was very little running beyond into the spaces something that was perhaps restricted by a very powerful central Sunderland unit sitting deep, though equally encouraged by both players trying to link deeper areas where they often weren''t required. We have an overload in that area already, our wing backs will not sit high and wide (nor should they) so some penetrative attacking running behind the opposition looks a strategic necessity. Farke reacted to this in the second half and moved Josh Murphy into a more central role, to use his dynamic running and stretching pace in the centre forward areas. Something the Masterclasses have long called for, a good sign of fresh thinking and more creative deployment of resources and weapons.

Whilst Watkins and Jerome were bullied by Kone and his partner, Oliveira''s arrival and the central role Josh took on later on, saw sharper movement and a desire of both players to get on the half tune and have an early shot. This disrupted the centre backs from sitting deep and letting play go on in front of them as they had previously been able to do.

Oliveira''s Fulham antics unfortunately had an influence over today''s result. His more selfish game, keener to sharply pick balls up in the 10 area and spin and shoot, would have been ideal today, moving the game away from the powerful, but static Sunderland defenders. His arrival was required for half time (if not the start), but he could not be ''rewarded'' with a summons from the bench too early.

Parma had a wonderful system playing for free kicks and it is clear that this is a major instruction from Farke. All Maddison set pieces are dangerous and this is a wonderful new toy for us, one that we have truly lacked for years. We may create and score many chances for this and Farke clearly knows it. Our acting is not yet in the Casiraghi class (think a more technical Holt), though Maddison may yet be a thoroughtly reasonable Zola substitute at our level. His strikes have a lovely shape and pace to them, a weapon from all areas and angles. We must attack the space between the line held by defenders and the opposition goalkeeper, with particular focus on running in front of keeper''s eye line to ball delivery and from far beyond the last man from (very) deep, even starting right outside the wide edges of the box (and seemingly arriving ''behind the play'').

We look a better team already, though conversely we look like we lack - or are not imposing - our weapons. Some players are of course understandably finding their feet; Husband is a solid full back who hasn''t yet shown more expansive wing-back skills, Gunn will become more commanding of the key zonal spaces in front of him, Oliveira will move back to centre stage and offer a greedier threat from outside as well as inside the box. We will quickly be drilled to attack Maddison''s set pieces more dynamically (I like to see a portfolio of at least 5 US-style organised ''plays'', with creative new ones added regularly, clearly-defined running patterns for fee kicks in different areas of the pitch).

The impressive central midfield circulation is clearly a key theme and other, more forward-thinking players will need to to ride the Carousel in more useful and penetrative ways for it to become an offensive weapon and not merely a statistical connoisseur''s plaything. Pritchard was no doubt identified as a key figure in something more like a 3-5-1-1 where the 10 role is a genuine shooting option from around the edge of the box (meaning complete penetration isn''t necessary, again very Casiraghi-Zola). This is of course the issue with Hoolahan, who would otherwise also be a shoo-in, but won''t shoot from 10 yards, let alone 20).

ThIs is an open-floor Socratic Masterclass, with more questions than answers at this early stage, though it is interesting to analyse the organic growth of the new philosophy, with the inevitable short-term miss-steps and the identification of the intended over-arching principles.

It is a movable feast, with Farke also adapting principles to players, though the question will remain whether the philosophy can adjust to the level of player being asked to operate it, particularly in the key strategic positions (where financially we may be able to afford or sustain more than one option). In due course the Academy and the investment in younger players will need to fill these vacuums.

As with the playing philosophy, there will be no quick fix. The vision is longer-term and will need to be deeply ingrained throughout the club.

The Head Coach will be the lightning rod, but the over-arching direction of travel is established. This is the Carousel we are going to riding for some time. Clamouring for quick-fire change will be fairly futile henceforth, all will need to buy into gradual, sustained progression via hard work and teaching.

kommst du über den hund, kommst du über den schwanz, nuh Daniel?

Parma

There has been issues with previous Masterclasses not revealing or discussing certain flaws in approaches - particularly early in the season

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"ThIs is an open-floor Socratic Masterclass"

That''s one way of describing it... though.....

ps these issues, will they be available in our local newsagents ?

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Parma Ham''s gone mouldy ~ [quote]There are far more questions than answers at this early stage though there are the outlines of shapes and intended approaches visible.

There is often a notable difference between what is intended and what is produced, so our current vision is limited to the major themes and how they should work.

Today''s game offered us a glimpse into some aspects of the future that we might not have expected as a result of our dominance of possession. The first half in particular - with an incredible (hitherto unseen?) 75% possession rate - demonstrated some coaching patterns that are designed to repeat on an ongoing basis.

A number of structural issues have been confronted - they may understandably not be polished gems or fully formed strategies on the pitch - which is excellent to see and offers hope in the medium term.

The importance of the CDM role and the space including and around the deep-lying defensive pivot is fully embraced under the new system.

Reed is a natural fit for the position and is as good as we can realistically expect at this point in time. He is tidy in possession, diligent, a tenacious tackler and two occasions today highlighted two key skills that we have been sorely lacking (by anyone who has played in the area). At 0-2 a midfield break burst beyond our midfield line, with Lateral Central defenders stretched and Zimmerman isolated and on the turn. Not only did Reed produce a highly professional foul, from the other side of the referee - making no attempt to play the ball - he recognised quickly when and why it was necessary. I cannot stress how crucial this skill is, we have spent 18 months not doing it - and worse - not being mentally aware of when it would have been necessary. This lack of game intelligence is absolutely fatal at the higher level.(As an aside, quite how he escaped a booking is beyond me. Poor refereeing, but very much highlighting playing and refereeing differences in England and Europe. It would have been a yellow and a half in Europe, with all baying for red, knowing the strategic importance of the deliberate move. Here nobody blinked, even in red.)

Secondly, later in the game, though still at 0-2, am inside right attacking midfield channel opened up for Reed, which he rightly drove into. Upon releasing the ball in an advanced position, a mental and tactical runner band pulled him sharply back into the right area of the pitch for his role (he sprinted), regardless of the next attacking phase. Really good, important structural play. He still offers an out ball, though any puppy-ball-chasing tendencies (à la Tettey) are thoroughly outgrained. Good.

James Maddison - a remarkable promotion in a short space of time - is a pivotal player in the new system. He is entrusted as the playmaker and time-keeper of the side already. Setting the tempo, being the permanent carousel option, dropping deep alongside Reed, who in turn will drop between any of the centre backs to receive or retain possession (including Gunn whenever necessary). Along with Naismith (today), he provides a permanent option to whoever receives the first ball and then continues to circulate and provide a 5 yard option. It almost appears that recipients are expected to feed him on demand, regardless of the tightness of situation and regardless as to whether his touch must be brief and returned, just keep the ball - and of course the opposition - moving.

Naismith is a willing, diligent and vocal foil. He is an organiser, a responsibility-taker and someone who takes up good positions without the ball. Previous Masterclasses identified him as an option in a deeper midfield role and this suits his character and desire to be useful and involved. His skills are not all silky however and his teammates will neeed to avoid confusing him with Maddison in tight central situations, his game is simple and suitable, though his touch less featherlight and he does not spin out of cul-de-sacs. He must also be wary of drifting into attacking areas without paying attention to the spaces behind him and calculating the likely odds of success of the attacking play. His role is not at all cost-free tactically now, he must adhere to Station to mitigate counters.

The shape and operation of this central midfield axis is disciplined, organised and strong however. Games are won and lost here and this is a great positive for us. We have a good blend, shape and range of options outside of the Reed role, without him it is not clear to me who from the current squad would then fill the significant tactical void.

The 3-5-2 shape and our intended pattern of play - and I am surprised to see it operate as a fairly flat forward 2, rather than a 3-5-1-1 around a fulcrum 9 - suits some players well, though shows up weaknesses in others.

Martin looks very comfortable in the shape and his role is ideally suited to him. He moves into the 3/4 defensive areas - and indeed presses into full back spaces willingly. His movements are fluid and natural and he is a round peg in a round hole on the right side of a 3. I suspect Farke will look at his early season tendency to get squared up when one-to-one and plant his feet with wide forward driving at him from the wings (a front foot orthodox boxer''s stance, then a crab-like gradual shutting of the space would be textbook), but his natural playing tendencies suit the shape well and he is positive, confident and progressive in possession of the ball, which is a fundamental requirement to operate in the new system. Lateral central defenders must split wide and early, receive balls quickly from the goalkeeper and shovel it on early with as few touches as possible. Any shutting down of the wing back spaces requires a fast chain of passes of passes out to the opposite side, with an emphasis on speed of ball movement via ''messages on the ball'' (playing it in to the space of where the player should move to, in order him to be able to make the next pass, which is inherent and ''messaged'' from the previous one. Or if you prefer: The first passer is passing to the second player in such a way as to show him what pass the third player needs) even in the centre back areas.

Zimmerman is stepping up in class considerably from his previously level. The Championship can see big, strong, limited sides like Sunderland lunge forward in numbers and overwhelm new defenders used to time on the ball and highly structured, lower-risk, less hung-ho attacking movements seen in much of Europe. Franke looked uncomfortable with these oppressive bursts throughout. His use of the ball was also a little pedestrian and predictable. A sense of trying to play too safe, too careful, paralysis-through-analysis. Early days of course. Klose will be ideally suited if we can afford to keep him and he is motivated to do so (both significant question marks).

Whilst Maddison was probably the best player on the pitch, with nice deep possession and a real sense of influence of the pattern and tempo of the game, Norwich as a side lacked the ''Carrick pass'' today, something this system is going to have to find a version of to penetrate teams that sit back. This is a ball that quickly and sharply links deep midfield to a receiving forward, number ten or high-playing number 8.

This was very much where our game plan fell down today. It is not an easy pass, nor is the job done once it''s received, though Watkins and Jerome will have to do vastly better at moving into these areas, drifting away from centre backs to the sides of deeper minfielders, and then linking together or finding wider players moving toward them (and then driving into the wider channels outside opposition midfielders and attacking spaces between centre backs and full backs).

We lacked weapons today. The question remains what our weapons are and where and how we can most effectively deploy them. Masterclass-defined weapons are players that hurt the opposition shape, tactics and set up and make them change, adjust tactics or take risks ignoring the issue.

It may surprise some, but Wildschut is rightly identified as a weapon. The question is - as with many flawed weapons at our level - can we develop and effectively employ his weapons without exposing to a greater degree his weaknesses, and can the shape and tactics of the side accommodate all of this (in effect: is it worth it anyway?). Wildschut can run past players for fun. A huge weapon. He takes players out of the game and can easily create overloads it players can get up with him. This is great, but he is a head-down runner and is relatively unaware of angles around him having broken into space. His final-ball decision-making is poor and he often appears to not make any decision at all in such situations. As Farke has pointed out, we must be a breeding ground and coach, nurture and improve such assets (we cannot buy polished diamonds), though in the early stages it may be worth encouraging him to shoot early having beaten a man and just get strikers to follow in. It may be that he is a fast player with a brain that freezes when confronted with options, less thinking and simpler instructions may be to his advantage. He is not a natural wing-back however and his driving and attacking orders are only possible because a responsible, reliable operator like Martin will cover for him (critics note: it is also what players can do to facilitate and extract skills from others, not merely what actions they perform themselves).

The flat forward 2 is hitherto based on hard work and filling some defensive passing-angle-spaces to reduce counters at source. This is fine, though neither Jerome nor Watkins looked remotely penetrative today in this set up. They both had very poor games, with unnecessarily poor touches and somewhat leaden-looking channel running , even when presented with spaces down the sides of the centre backs. There was very little running beyond into the spaces something that was perhaps restricted by a very powerful central Sunderland unit sitting deep, though equally encouraged by both players trying to link deeper areas where they often weren''t required. We have an overload in that area already, our wing backs will not sit high and wide (nor should they) so some penetrative attacking running behind the opposition looks a strategic necessity. Farke reacted to this in the second half and moved Josh Murphy into a more central role, to use his dynamic running and stretching pace in the centre forward areas. Something the Masterclasses have long called for, a good sign of fresh thinking and more creative deployment of resources and weapons.

Whilst Watkins and Jerome were bullied by Kone and his partner, Oliveira''s arrival and the central role Josh took on later on, saw sharper movement and a desire of both players to get on the half tune and have an early shot. This disrupted the centre backs from sitting deep and letting play go on in front of them as they had previously been able to do.

Oliveira''s Fulham antics unfortunately had an influence over today''s result. His more selfish game, keener to sharply pick balls up in the 10 area and spin and shoot, would have been ideal today, moving the game away from the powerful, but static Sunderland defenders. His arrival was required for half time (if not the start), but he could not be ''rewarded'' with a summons from the bench too early.

Parma had a wonderful system playing for free kicks and it is clear that this is a major instruction from Farke. All Maddison set pieces are dangerous and this is a wonderful new toy for us, one that we have truly lacked for years. We may create and score many chances for this and Farke clearly knows it. Our acting is not yet in the Casiraghi class (think a more technical Holt), though Maddison may yet be a thoroughtly reasonable Zola substitute at our level. His strikes have a lovely shape and pace to them, a weapon from all areas and angles. We must attack the space between the line held by defenders and the opposition goalkeeper, with particular focus on running in front of keeper''s eye line to ball delivery and from far beyond the last man from (very) deep, even starting right outside the wide edges of the box (and seemingly arriving ''behind the play'').

We look a better team already, though conversely we look like we lack - or are not imposing - our weapons. Some players are of course understandably finding their feet; Husband is a solid full back who hasn''t yet shown more expansive wing-back skills, Gunn will become more commanding of the key zonal spaces in front of him, Oliveira will move back to centre stage and offer a greedier threat from outside as well as inside the box. We will quickly be drilled to attack Maddison''s set pieces more dynamically (I like to see a portfolio of at least 5 US-style organised ''plays'', with creative new ones added regularly, clearly-defined running patterns for fee kicks in different areas of the pitch).

The impressive central midfield circulation is clearly a key theme and other, more forward-thinking players will need to to ride the Carousel in more useful and penetrative ways for it to become an offensive weapon and not merely a statistical connoisseur''s plaything. Pritchard was no doubt identified as a key figure in something more like a 3-5-1-1 where the 10 role is a genuine shooting option from around the edge of the box (meaning complete penetration isn''t necessary, again very Casiraghi-Zola). This is of course the issue with Hoolahan, who would otherwise also be a shoo-in, but won''t shoot from 10 yards, let alone 20).

ThIs is an open-floor Socratic Masterclass, with more questions than answers at this early stage, though it is interesting to analyse the organic growth of the new philosophy, with the inevitable short-term miss-steps and the identification of the intended over-arching principles.

It is a movable feast, with Farke also adapting principles to players, though the question will remain whether the philosophy can adjust to the level of player being asked to operate it, particularly in the key strategic positions (where financially we may be able to afford or sustain more than one option). In due course the Academy and the investment in younger players will need to fill these vacuums.

As with the playing philosophy, there will be no quick fix. The vision is longer-term and will need to be deeply ingrained throughout the club.

The Head Coach will be the lightning rod, but the over-arching direction of travel is established. This is the Carousel we are going to riding for some time. Clamouring for quick-fire change will be fairly futile henceforth, all will need to buy into gradual, sustained progression via hard work and teaching.

kommst du über den hund, kommst du über den schwanz, nuh Daniel?

Parma

There has been issues with previous Masterclasses not revealing or discussing certain flaws in approaches - particularly early in the season[/quote]How to state what I say in every other post, but turn into a novel [:D]Cheers, Shakespea... Parma [Y][B]

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So essentially we lost points today to prove a point to Oliveira when really we just showed how vulnerable without him.

Farke needs to get a hold on this and quickly. I expect Oliveira to be back for the QPR game especially after such poor games from Watkins and Jerome.

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I agree with most of this but disagree on Naismith or at least don''t agree that he should be selected at the expense of Wes and/or Murphy.

The key problem though (once we went behind anyway) was the lack of clever movement and guile up front.

Also not seen much mention of it but we were denied an absolute stonewall penalty at 0-0 which obviously could have made a huge difference had it been given and we''d scored.

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It would be pretty hard to argue against your point Tettey''s Jig.

In the first half particularly Jerome and Watkins carried out their high pressing duties diligently, which to be fair is not mentally easy and often goes unnoticed. Neither Oliveira nor Josh Murphy are thrilled by such detail.

The high press only works - much like the midfield Carousel and its connecting forward outlets (and split defensive retention options) - is has to operated by all in a joined-up and mentally engaged process. All players must see the need, react to the need and engage the will to join.

It involves trigger points, sharp sprints and pack-hunting shutting down of opposition passing angles forcing them (including their goalkeeper''s feet) to go long. The first half demonstrated it well early on, it requires resources of mental will and hard-running fitness to employ it throughout.

Oliveira''s argument might well be that such operations ''run the magic'' out of him, when sharp striking instincts are required to decide tight games. Endless mentally-engaged pressing can take a toll on some players'' ability, particularly in the last 20 minutes of games when more mistakes occur and a Michael Owen-minded player would smell blood and conversely ''come alive''.

Parma

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the midfield Carousel and its connecting forward outlets (and split defensive retention options) - is has to operated by all in a joined-up and mentally engaged process.

Sorry but stuff like this is pretentious boll-ox, you can use plain English instead

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Excellent post Parma and a good reflection on where we currently are.

The concerning aspect is some fans referring to the game as boring. Our style isn''t boring unless there''s literally nothing going on in your brain. But id hate to see this project not reach it''s conclusion because fans are impatient entitled idiots.

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A thorough and very interesting analysis of things and a good read. Love the use of the English language too. We are a work in progress on a diffetent level than before and people need to try and understand the principles involved. It isn''t just a case of "get it forwards".

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In all seriousness, fantastic stuff Parma. Thank you.

i agree about Wildschut, although I think he''s a bit better than you suggest - his cut backs at Fulham were pinpoint, & we should have had at least one goal from them. Very much a confidence player & this is where good man-management is required.

I confess I do not like Naismith. I think he''s a bang average player who got lucky & has made the most of his opportunities, for which good luck to him. A useful squad player, but nothing more, certainly not a game changer.

I think the overall plan is to have a system that doesn''t rely on the ability of individual players, one where you can (ideally) slot one of several players into it without disturbing the overall pattern. This means injuries to key players are less disruptive.

If you like it''s more about lifting the overall performance level than relying on one Huckerby type player to get you out of trouble every week.

Less exciting for the fans. But (hopefully) more productive in the long run. We''ll find out eventually one way or another - but it could be a long eventually.

Bring on kew peeee aarrrgggh!

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[quote user="FenwayFrank"]the midfield Carousel and its connecting forward outlets (and split defensive retention options) - is has to operated by all in a joined-up and mentally engaged process.

Sorry but stuff like this is pretentious boll-ox, you can use plain English instead[/quote]That''s the whole point, it is a send up. No one could post up stull like ....."I suspect Farke will look at his early season tendency to get squared up

when one-to-one and plant his feet with wide forward driving at him

from the wings (a front foot orthodox boxer''s stance, then a crab-like

gradual shutting of the space would be textbook)"
.... without a huge smile on his faceIt is nothing more than a pee take of those who imagine football is a mixture of chess and battlships - ather than a fast moving sport where it is the immediate reactions and actions that determine what happens.If you can''t see it is a wind up then this should give it away"It would have been a yellow and a half in Europe, "If not, then"This is of course the issue with Hoolahan, who would otherwise also be a shoo-in, but won''t shoot from 10 yards, let alone 20)"https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iedwcLjdcTo1.15 secs

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[quote user="Maniacal Bill"][quote user="FenwayFrank"]the midfield Carousel and its connecting forward outlets (and split defensive retention options) - is has to operated by all in a joined-up and mentally engaged process.

Sorry but stuff like this is pretentious boll-ox, you can use plain English instead[/quote]That''s the whole point, it is a send up. No one could post up stull like ....."I suspect Farke will look at his early season tendency to get squared up

when one-to-one and plant his feet with wide forward driving at him

from the wings (a front foot orthodox boxer''s stance, then a crab-like

gradual shutting of the space would be textbook)"
.... without a huge smile on his faceIt is nothing more than a pee take of those who imagine football is a mixture of chess and battlships - ather than a fast moving sport where it is the immediate reactions and actions that determine what happens.If you can''t see it is a wind up then this should give it away"It would have been a yellow and a half in Europe, "If not, then"This is of course the issue with Hoolahan, who would otherwise also be a shoo-in, but won''t shoot from 10 yards, let alone 20)"https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iedwcLjdcTo1.15 secs[/quote]
Parma''s posts have an extra degree of verbal flourish not only to compensate for the inability to converse in his native language, but also the impossibilty of being able to converse via waving his arms and motioning with his hands.
As an Italian and a football coach, the suppressed physical gestures get translated into more words and more elaborate phrases via his keyboard. Seems to stack up if you ask me!

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Not sure I understood it all but a very enjoyable read.

My slight concern is that our system has us trying to force the opposition to play long balls........... which our defence seems to have a problem with ;)

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[quote user="lake district canary"]Personally like the way he plays with the English language. Shows a love of the language which is expressed creatively and although may take a little extra effort to read, is all the better for it.[/quote]Agreed. And it''s the first time I''ve imagined a giant crab being on a football pitch.

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@Parma
"Norwich as a side lacked the ''Carrick pass'' today, something this system is going to have to find a version of to penetrate teams that sit back. This is a ball that quickly and sharply links deep midfield to a receiving forward, number ten or high-playing number 8."
Vrancic provided an element of this sort of directness in previous games. I thought we missed him yesterday.

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Of course it''s all a wind upHe admiitted it some while back, and still the gormless fall for itAny one who has played football from a kid in the park upwards knows that the game is about immediate action, and reactionthe quicker and more consistent you are the better a player you usually areit''s as simply as thatand this gibberish is no more relevant to the real game than the Ring Cycle is to  historical realityand this is meaningless shyte in what ever language it started out as"with an emphasis on speed of ball movement via ''messages on the ball''

(playing it in to the space of where the player should move to, in order

him to be able to make the next pass, which is inherent and ''messaged''

from the previous one. Or if you prefer: The first passer is passing to

the second player in such a way as to show him what pass the third

player needs) even in the centre back areas.

"
absolute bollox of the highest order - there is no chain of passing determined by the first ''passer'' - if only that it can not be known what the opposing players will be doing in that time

ps remind me again about Hoolahan''s inability to shoot

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Interesting and eloquent read from Parma as always, for my reply i wont go to deep with it. Fans were demanding change from what we had under both Hughton and AN, bar ANs first 6 months. That included not just on the pitch, but to get a big clearout of players, many of whom were past their sell by date. Also would of necessity include a very active transfer window. Delia and Co. heard it and knew it anyway, brought in Webber, who not only has done what was required, but done it with the necessity of  hugely cutting City''s cloth. Guys, the Board know much more the financial position of NCFC than we do, so dont lambast them  so much as to whats happened this last few months.So, complete  new management set up, complete new style and way for City, a head coach with a definite plan for now and the future, his job to get this vision  working into such a big new mix of players at his disposal. One week and 3 games in, already there are, for me, much to many murmurs of discontent from fans. DF has had to begin his vision with a plethora of injuries, but already his possesion based idea  is starting to happen, if we witness the stats of the last couple matches. Yes he has big issues, the defence of course, but he knows this, and i suspect the players do to.Parma mentioned mid term fruit forming, and hopefully that mid term form will produce  long term ripeness. But, Delia and Co.can change the management set up, who in turn can change the playing staff and style, which has been done, but she cannot change ordinary fans who are impatient even in the very short term, just 1 week, for goodness sake.Football''s a funny old  game Saint, and fans are even funnier.They sure are Greavsie.

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I''m with LDC.

It seems City 1st lashes out at any post he doesn''t understand.

Thus he lashes out at most posts.

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Football is a simple game.

Can just imagine certain footballers, sat there, in a dressing room, whilst their Manager comes out with this analysis, and coaching tactics................

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