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Rock The Boat

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Rock The Boat last won the day on October 8

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About Rock The Boat

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  1. What a difference a Tettey makes. Much more composed at the back. But Pukki is isolated up front without support. Would settle for 0-0
  2. Rock The Boat

    President Trump

    Evidence of Trump engorging himself?
  3. Rock The Boat

    President Trump

    They all have their objectives, KG, as do we the people. It is an oversimplification to say that sometimes our objectives coincide and and sometimes they don't, it's obviously more complex than that, but we, the people have to exist as a strong and independent force to act as a balance between both the political classes, and big business - and I would add the technocrat class as another group who have their own set of values and objectives, that have to be included in the discussion. So what I see going on it a lot of pushes and pulling between these different groups, sometimes working in tandem, sometimes in opposition, alliances made and alliances broken as the groups compete for what they believe in. To give you an example as someone like yourself who worked in the TU movement will know, much of your effort was in standing up to the claims of the business classes and at times the political classes would work with you and sometimes against you. When it comes to the subject of climate change the the technocrat classes might seek alliances with the political classes to promote a certain view point to the people. What I think has been happening over the past forty years is the weakening influence of the people as a collective group. One could write chapters on examples of this, but a few examples would be how politicians no longer have careers in business or public service before they enter politics but nowadays they have a separate career stream separated from the rest of society. On the original Brexit thread, I posted a chart which showed that in 1970, more than 80% of MPs had a previous career outside of politics. In the current Parliament about 25% of MPs had non-political careers before entering Parliament. The upshot being, according to the authors of the report, that Parliamentarians are less inclined to act for the public good and more like to act to uphold a given ideology. The actions of MPs in Brexit seems to confirm this. The influence of people is weakened in other ways. Forty years ago, we were a culturally homogeneous group. We all used to watch the same TV programmes, listened to the same music, ate the same food, spoke the same language. Today, we have far more choices in what we can do, watch, listen to and think, which are all good things in themselves, but the price to be paid is the weakening of a cultural and social identity, which has now reach a point where people are becoming unsure of what their identity is. One of the reasons for the debate on gender is a reaction to the splintering and fragmentation of identity. And people who do not know who they are, are not strong people. And if you are not strong you cannot have much influence in this battle of competing interests between people, politicians, business and technocrats. Which brings to Brexit and Trump. Both of which, I believe are examples of the pushback from people against politicians and business. In the case of Trump it more against politicians than business, but as business becomes more global and more 'woke' they will start to feel the pushback, too. Reference Gillette and their woke adverts which saw a big drop in sales. Silicom Valley tech companies - an alliance between technocrats and business - such as Facebook, Amazon, Uber, Airbnb, are all beginning to take the heat for what folks are seeing as unacceptable practices and unfair business models. The pushback continues elsewhere. In Catalonia, in Hong Kong, in France there is a rising sense of injustice against the political classes and those that align with them. Well, when you and I were young men and faced with perceived injustices - Vietnam, Human Rights, it was the left that stood up to the politicians. But it seems to me that today the left have got themselves tied up in this battle over social and cultural identity and they've allowed themselves to become disengaged from the need to pushback against the other groups. They have become part of the process of weakening people. Universities that forty years ago were hotbeds of student debate and centres of revolt against the ruling classes have become places of de-platforming of free speech, havens of safe spaces for the easily offended, and centres of authoritarian intolerance. As a result it has been the right - by electing Trump, forming Brexit Party and UKIP, Five Star in Italy, the rise of populism - who have been the force to oppose the status quo and the vested interests of the other groups. And what I think we need to do now is to continue the fight that began eight hundred years ago to take away the power of sovereignty from the monarch, and to get sovereignty into the hands of the people - and not parliament. That should be the ultimate goal of brexit.
  4. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Our very own Hong Kong. Boris plays a blinder!
  5. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Nicola Sturgeon has played Brexit really badly and I think she will get punished by her party because of it. They will look at the £millions that DUP have walked away with and senior members of the SNP will be wondering why they have managed to make sweet FA (to keep this football-related) out of Brexit. There are going to be some seismic shocks when the next election comes around and I suspect Ms. Sturgeon will be one of the victims. She has won nothing for Scotland from Brexit and the electorate will punish her. As for Wales, Tories will make inroads into the border and northern counties and this will weaken any thoughts of devolution or independence. Besides, it's the regions who will hope to benefit from any windfall spending after the election so not the best time to act silly ****s.
  6. Rock The Boat

    President Trump

    KG, Donald Trump is not a politician, he is a businessman, an outsider, and because of this he is loathed by the political establishment. They seek to destroy him by innuendo and fake news. He has been President for almost four years now and so far the political establishment has been unable to pin a single thing on him, despite their continuous and daily attempts to thwart the running of the country. As an outsider he is beholden to nobody, and so is disliked by all those who depend on the pork barrel. Barak Obama left office having enriched himself to the tune of $40m net worth, greater even than George Bush who comes from a long family line of extremely wealthy people. Trump on the other hand has come to the office of President without the need to enrich himself The scandal has all been manufactured by the political establishment and the media. Just like the present Biden-Ukraine so-called scandal which when you strip away the fake stuff the real story of Joe Biden's cronyism to install his son into a Ukrainian engineering company, for which he has no qualifications, and has made $4m to-date, while Biden senior was VP, comes to light. Remember it was Biden Snr. who first asked the Ukranian president to sack an investigator looking into the Biden affair, which he did, in a quid-pro-quo agreement which kicked off this business. It is noteworthy that the media did not go after the initial Biden story during Obama's tenure, but they are all over the follow up when Trump asked the Ukrainian President for information on the backstory. And it has been like this ever since Trump was elected, starting with fake news about his inauguration rally and has continued relentlessly ever since. As you point out yourself, Trump is never attacked over his record in the economy because the truth is the economy has done exceedingly well over the past three years. You can describe Trump as being a disruptor. His way of working is to never take things at face value but to challenge the status quo. He is in a very strong position to act in this way, and as a result is able to act decisively if necessary, and because of this he is loathed by those operators who are more used to a compromise personality. Well, the US voted for a disruptor, just as the UK voted for Brexit as a disruption mechanism, because they were fed up with the developing drift of a political class increasingly distant and out-of-touch with the lives of regular people. And while you may not like Trump or Farage they are the people who are the most attuned to what regular people feel and think. If you want to get rid of Trump, it isn't him or the people who have to change, it is the political class who have to change and become properly accountable to people like us. Until that happens I will always vote for the disruptors.
  7. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Well don't attempt to climb on top of any tube train carriages when you get to London. The result might be a bit embarrassing but you'd get your 15 minutes of fame.
  8. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    So, if you were an MP sitting in the House of Commons, knowing that Junker has said no more extensions, would you: A) vote for the deal or B) vote against the deal?
  9. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Deluded until the end.
  10. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Why would you want to join the Euro?
  11. Rock The Boat

    President Trump

    Brett Mcgurk is a policy hawk who wants to keep American troops in Syria. I'm surprised you support such people, Herman. Mcgurk resigned from the administration in December 2018 citing the Presidents decision to withdraw US troops from Syria as the reason. SO for Mcgurk to claim that the president made the decision on Sunday evening is a lie. He is trying to stay relevant in something in which he is no longer involved. Perhaps you and Brett could go over there and fight alongside the Kurds.
  12. Rock The Boat

    This Baby is Biiiiggggggggggggg!!!

    You have made a very compelling argument for wind power in some of your posts, TL. Combined with greater efficiencies in battery storage, I think you could be onto a winner
  13. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Benn Act is now an irrelevance if the EU does not want an extension. It means either a deal passes through the HoP or we leave with no deal on October 31. Junkers announcement really puts the cat among the pigeons. If ERG and DUP vote against the deal it needs Labour to support it to get through. Next few days should be fun
  14. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    I think you hit the nail on the head when you say that the EU thinks this is the best deal they can get, and given that they don't want a recalcitrant UK hanging around the shop forever then they rule out an extension to put the onus on the UK to accept the deal. No member state will veto the deal, they fear the consequences
  15. Rock The Boat

    President Trump

    Are you sure you want to get into a discussion with me about insecurity?
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