Jump to content
Note to existing users - password reset is required Read more... ×

Rock The Boat

Members
  • Content Count

    4,510
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    4

Everything posted by Rock The Boat

  1. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Yes, it was pretty amazing wasn't it. We had all this great stuff in the 80s because Thatcher turned the economy around, defeated the wrecking trade unions, brought in a modern economy, and created an environment where boomers could work hard and keep more of the money that they earned. Quite a different story from the 70s where inflation was out of control as were the trade unions, borrowing to the max, unemployment at an all-time high and taxes beyond belief. What was it 95% on unearned income. It was collective misery for everyone, as I recall. What's really scary is that Corbyn and Mcdonall want to re-create the same economic conditions as we had in the 70s.
  2. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Official job figures out today. They prove that EU workers have been displacing British workers. The figures also kill the myth that British don't want to work. The official job figures contained some good news for the labour market as unemployment dipped, taking the jobless rate back to 3.8pc. It has not been lower since 1974. It means 32.75 million people are in work according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS). Compared with this time last year employment is up by 323,000. At the same time 1.3 million people are unemployed - one of the lowest levels in more than 40 years. By nationality, an additional 125,000 Britons are in employment, outweighed by a drop of 131,000 EU nationals – the biggest fall in the 21 years on record. The drop covers citizens from all across the EU, with a fall of 39,000 among EU14 nationals - the older member states including France, Germany and Spain - as well as 49,000 from the "accession eight", including Poland and 42,000 from the EU2 of Romania and Bulgaria.
  3. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    It's amazing that forty-years on and people are still triggered by Margaret Thatcher.
  4. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Thatcher created a culture of entitlement? You're havin' a larf, BF.
  5. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Obviously you do.
  6. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Perhaps Bagster and Len heard from somewhere that we're not leaving the EU
  7. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    I would dispute that view of the past. In 1945 the country was bankrupt and the generation of which you talk had very little wealth for the main part. Particularly in a rural area such as Norfolk, poverty, or low-income as they call it these days, was very much a feature of daily life for the majority. The post-war generation did work hard as did the boomer generation who also lived under the shadow of the war time experience as the consequences lingered on for years after. It really wasn't until we reached the 80s that we saw the rise of the entitlement culture that now seems to be a characteristic of millennials.
  8. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    The wealthier, happier and more interesting world created by us boomers, I think you mean. From what I have seen of snowflakes is that they are timid, live in an echo chamber, self-regarding , inexperienced and intolerant of anything that they don't understand - which is most things. I would much rather be a boomer than a millennial.
  9. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    The first election in which I was old enough to vote saw the election of Tony Blair, which makes me just middle-aged enough to remember this Britain arriving. Coffee not tea (and not instant coffee either); cities not towns; low-cost flights, not Butlins; multiculture not monoculture; Jamie Oliver, avocados, broadband, the restyled Mini Cooper; mass customisation; 50% of young people going to universities; everything done on a mountain of debt, especially that 50% graduate rate. If Thatcherism opened the country economically, Blair’s Britain did so culturally. This double “openness” is the heart of “cultural Remain”. BY THE SAME AUTHOR How motherhood put an end to my liberalism BY MARY HARRINGTON There are many desirable things about this “open” world and lifestyle. I am a big fan of avocados and European minibreaks, but even leaving aside these caricature “left behind” curmudgeons in the stagnant provinces, openness is a double-edged sword. One of its side effects has been a boom in the cost of living and, with it, a rising inequality (that began under Thatcher) and continued — particularly in the South — under Blair, only to get worse in the 2008 crash. Meanwhile, the boom in openness-promoting tertiary education produced not so much a boom in graduate jobs as inflation in the qualification levels required to do the jobs we already had. This has left many young people struggling to service a mountain of debt on salaries that are never likely to show much of the “graduate premium” they were promised. Today, thanks in part to the “open” economy whose values form the foundation of the “cultural Remain” identity, the cost of living — and especially home ownership — has rocketed. Simple aspirations that were within the reach of the working class in the 20th century are an unattainable dream today for millions of young people far higher up the sociocultural pile. And yet those young graduates have all, in the course of moving away to get their degree, absorbed the “open” value set now explicitly taught in tertiary education. The result is an Everywhere precariat, that has absorbed the values of a world that has little to offer it in terms of concrete benefits, and resolves this conflict by renting the heavily-subsidised and internet-enabled perks of a smarter lifestyle than it can afford to buy. Where once rentals might have just been housing and cars, today that can even include clothing. BY THE SAME AUTHOR Social mobility won't bring social justice BY MARY HARRINGTON The ferocious pro-EU rearguard action does not just represent the anger of an incumbent ruling class defending its perks. It also expresses the class anxieties of the lower echelons of those supposedly elite “open” classes, provisionally accepted as such via their graduate status, whose access to the perks of the open culture is at best precarious but whose cultural identity depends on it. “Cultural Remain” should be understood less as a reasoned-through position and more as a highly emotional proxy for a faltering but still enticing lifestyle promise. As well as a howl of rage by a middle class unused to being balked, it is a wail of terror from young people terrified at the prospect of falling through the ever-thinning economic ice that separates the slick, happy modern “us” from the miserable, stagnant “them”. It is in this context that we should understand Corbynism. Because the truth is that for many young people there is barely a fag paper between the urban twenty- and thirtysomething aspirational lifestyles rented via subscription services such as WeWork amid the coffee-shops and short-term rental markets of London, and those less fortunate ‘left-behind’ ones scraping by in the fulfilment hellscape of an Amazon depot. No savings, no spare time, certainly no capacity to make long-term plans or get married or have kids. The only difference is that one lot get to enjoy their rented lifestyle along with avocado on toast and a “connected fitness experience” instead of ready meals and sanctions for taking time off sick. Seen this way, one can understand better the totemic power of “freedom of movement”. You might not be able to afford to buy a house where you want to, but at least, says the optimism of youth, with freedom of movement we still have the limitless potential to try something new. To start afresh, somewhere else. Not to mention that same freedom means people with lifestyles even more precarious than our own can come here to staff coffee shops and warehouses, which reassures us we’ve got it better than them. That we’re still us. SUGGESTED READING How to make Britain One Nation again BY DAVID SKELTON But even that party may be drawing to an end. As Janan Ganesh recently noted, the days of the middle-class “world traveller” may be numbered. Graduate starting salaries in the UK are some of the lowest in northern Europe, especially in the creative sectors. Since the crash of 2008, wages for young people have been hit the hardest even as the burden of student debt rises. The cost of living is rising faster for those in rental accommodation than for homeowners, and with it the cost of those ancillary lifestyle services that console young Everywheres for the way twentieth-century aspirations have moved beyond their grasp. WeWork, Uber and Peloton all posted staggering losses in 2019; how long before the price of their services goes up under investor pressure on the bottom line? Even the price of avocados tripled between 2013 and 2018. The urban Everywhere precariat is heading for a crunch. They may have bought into the “open” cultural values disseminated by debt-fuelled universities. They may have flocked to London in search of a job in the media, and painted their faces blue to attend People’s Vote rallies. But millions of young Everywheres are on their way to realising they are not counted among the elite any more. That, in fact, they never were, except on a subscription basis — and even the cost of those subscriptions is slipping from their grasp. We can expect a political reckoning to follow. Describes a few on here
  10. Rock The Boat

    President Trump

    Adam Schiff has blocked every GOP witness from testifying before his impeachment committee Not Hunter Biden Not the Whistleblower Absolutely no one that the GOP requested as a witness will be allowed to speak How is this due process?
  11. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Lady Nugee shrugs shoulders, doesn't give sh!t Labour can't be trusted with our security - or the economy
  12. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Source: The Telegraph With the 0.3pc expansion reported on Monday, Britain has now had 13 quarters of economic growth since the Brexit referendum. The evidence is irrefutable: the UK economy has grown faster than Germany, France and the eurozone as a whole for most of the last two years. It is has outgrown several west European states even since the vote. Totting up the exact numbers, it is no longer excusable for the Remainer establishment, the Liberal Democrats, and allied think tanks, to keep claiming that the UK economy is 3pc smaller than it would have been without Brexit, or that we are “3pc poorer” in Westminster parlance. The total accumulated growth for the UK is 4.9pc. This compares with Belgium (4.7pc), or Germany (4.7pc) if we generously assume that there is no German contraction in the third quarter when the final result comes out later this week, not to mention Italy (3.2pc). France (5.8pc) has been the outperformer, in part because Emmanuel Macron has abandoned key reforms and lavished fiscal stimulus on the gilets jaunes, but even so France has not outstripped the UK by much. The overall picture of the last three years is taking clear shape. The UK had a relatively bad year in 2017 when it was still carrying out fiscal tightening. The eurozone had a stellar year because the stars were briefly aligned: the end of austerity, the delayed effects of QE, and a Chinese mini-boom that lifted Germany, all at a time when there was still a large output gap and therefore plenty of low-hanging fruit. That one year of 2017 distorted perceptions and allowed anti-Brexit agitators - including at times the Bank of England and the International Monetary Fund, and above all lobby groups funded by EU vested interests - to foster a narrative of lost growth, which has since become an article of faith in the European and global media. That narrative has been invalidated by the last seven quarters. The UK has grown faster (2.2pc) than the eurozone as a whole (2pc) over that period, yet there has been no acknowledgement of this levelling effect. My guess is that the accumulated slippage in GDP growth since the referendum that can legitimately be attributed to Brexit is about 1pc. The rest is the result of global forces beyond our control and the crisis in the international car industry. Exaggerated claims by the anti-Brexit movement are part of an ideological battle within the UK and across the European political landscape. They are intended to shape opinion and change policy. They matter. They must therefore be confronted and debunked.
  13. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Do you want to add something about us not leaving the EU? That was the dumbest prediction of the past three years, Billy Boy. How are those composite motions getting on?
  14. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Coming back to my prediction of 30 seats
  15. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Oh dear Surfer, Obama left the stage three years ago. Claiming credit for what's happening today is scraping the barrel. Since Turmp came in all the economic indicators have turned green. And in the UK we're heading for the longest sustained run of economic growth since the war. It's because the Conservatives are trusted on the economy that people vote for them. We don't vote for Corbyn because we don't want to be another Venezuela.
  16. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    So deflecting now. Brexit never going to happen has been your big three-year lie.
  17. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Brexit not happening, Bill?
  18. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Your beans have been well and truly baked.
  19. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    They laughed, but they ain't laughing now
  20. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Don't cry Ms.Swinson, no one takes you seriously anyway After filing papers at the High Court against ITV over its decision to exclude Jo Swinson from the head-to-head leaders' debate, LibDem president Sal Brinton said: "General elections are about people's democratic choices.
  21. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Goodbye second referendum. At least those marches in London gave Remainers some much needed exercise
  22. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    The pound has now hit a six-month high versus the euro and strengthened as much as 1 percent against the dollar, after the Brexit Party said it would not contest previously Conservative held seats in the UK's upcoming election. It's seen as a big boost to Boris Johnson's chance of getting a majority and pushing through his Brexit deal. The pound rallied to as much as $1.2896 on the news, before easing to $1.2880. Versus the euro, the pound strengthened to its highest in six months, at 85.62p.
  23. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Keith Vaz, the Labour MP who was facing suspension from the Commons for six months after he was found to have “expressed willingness” to purchase cocaine for others, has announced he will not stand at the election.
  24. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Labour no longer represents working people in the north and Midlands. Labour is in the grip of hardline Momentum activists who have no interest in working people, their families and communities.
  25. Rock The Boat

    The Brexit Party

    Sir Nige has shown great courage and put country before party.
×