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The Positive Brexit Thread

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Oh.

https://www.ft.com/content/edb7d155-56b4-4065-9f83-31b2247fa178


The UK’s new trade deal with Japan commits it to tougher restrictions on state aid than the ones it is currently offering the EU in the Brexit talks, potentially undermining its negotiating position with Brussels. In the bilateral UK-Japan agreement announced in principle on Friday, London and Tokyo have agreed to replicate the restrictions on subsidies in the EU-Japan deal that went into effect last year. That agreement prohibits the governments from indefinitely guaranteeing the debts of struggling companies or providing an open-ended bailout without a clear restructuring plan in place. By contrast, the UK has repeatedly told the EU that it must have total freedom over state aid after the end of the Brexit transition period with complete autonomy over future subsidy decisions, subject to WTO rules. The so-called level-playing-field issues have become the main sticking point in the EU-UK negotiations, with London resisting Brussels’s demands for it to remain within the tough EU state aid regime. Britain’s proposal to the EU would merely require each side to notify the other of subsidies rather than restricting them. Its offer replicates the EU’s commitments in earlier bilateral trade deals, such as the one with Canada that went into force in 2017. A government spokesman said: “The UK offer to the EU is based on the arrangements agreed between Canada and the EU. The idea that we’ve given too much away is rubbish as far as I’m concerned Ally of Liz Truss “The UK-Japan agreement contains similar commitments, including on transparency about subsidies awarded and consultations over any concerns about those subsidies which may affect the other party.” However, the contradiction between the two positions has created consternation within the UK government. A person familiar with internal Whitehall deliberations said that the UK’s chief Brexit negotiator David Frost had raised concerns that Liz Truss, international trade secretary, had given more away to Japan on level playing field issues than was being offered to Brussels. One ally of Ms Truss said that the state aid elements of the Japan deal were “just a standard clause in any free trade agreement” rather than a more generous concession. “The idea that we’ve given too much away is rubbish as far as I’m concerned.” Trade experts said it would be awkward for the UK to maintain contrasting positions in two sets of talks. George Peretz, a barrister at the Monckton legal chambers in London, said: “The provisions on state aid in the EU-Japan FTA create some quite hard-edged commitments not to provide open-ended government support to companies. “If the UK-Japan FTA replicates those provisions, the UK will need to legislate to ensure that British public bodies do not contravene them. That could well compromise the UK’s negotiating position with the EU, where it has not offered anything like that level of commitment.” Recommended The FT ViewThe editorial board UK-Japan trade deal shows need for EU pact But some lawyers also stressed that the subsidy rules in the Japan bilateral deal were still weak compared with the detailed and invasive EU state aid regime. James Webber, a partner at the law firm Shearman & Sterling, said: “It’s a concession of sorts by the UK, but if this is where the negotiations end up, it will be much closer to the UK’s view of the world than the EU’s.” A government spokesperson said: “In all our trade negotiations, including with the EU and with Japan, we consistently make proposals which provide for open and fair competition, on the basis of high standards, in a way which is appropriate to a modern free trade agreement between sovereign and autonomous equals.”

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Sir David Frost spells out firmly and publicly exactly what the EU negotiating team is up to and why it is necessary to legally pass legislation depriving the bloc of the power to effectively cut off one part of the United Kingdom from importing food from another part of the United Kingdom:

image.thumb.png.e22409ef8fc384ebc759785ea94a2889.png

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2 hours ago, A Load of Squit said:

Oh.

https://www.ft.com/content/edb7d155-56b4-4065-9f83-31b2247fa178


The UK’s new trade deal with Japan commits it to tougher restrictions on state aid than the ones it is currently offering the EU in the Brexit talks, potentially undermining its negotiating position with Brussels. In the bilateral UK-Japan agreement announced in principle on Friday, London and Tokyo have agreed to replicate the restrictions on subsidies in the EU-Japan deal that went into effect last year. That agreement prohibits the governments from indefinitely guaranteeing the debts of struggling companies or providing an open-ended bailout without a clear restructuring plan in place. By contrast, the UK has repeatedly told the EU that it must have total freedom over state aid after the end of the Brexit transition period with complete autonomy over future subsidy decisions, subject to WTO rules. The so-called level-playing-field issues have become the main sticking point in the EU-UK negotiations, with London resisting Brussels’s demands for it to remain within the tough EU state aid regime. Britain’s proposal to the EU would merely require each side to notify the other of subsidies rather than restricting them. Its offer replicates the EU’s commitments in earlier bilateral trade deals, such as the one with Canada that went into force in 2017. A government spokesman said: “The UK offer to the EU is based on the arrangements agreed between Canada and the EU. The idea that we’ve given too much away is rubbish as far as I’m concerned Ally of Liz Truss “The UK-Japan agreement contains similar commitments, including on transparency about subsidies awarded and consultations over any concerns about those subsidies which may affect the other party.” However, the contradiction between the two positions has created consternation within the UK government. A person familiar with internal Whitehall deliberations said that the UK’s chief Brexit negotiator David Frost had raised concerns that Liz Truss, international trade secretary, had given more away to Japan on level playing field issues than was being offered to Brussels. One ally of Ms Truss said that the state aid elements of the Japan deal were “just a standard clause in any free trade agreement” rather than a more generous concession. “The idea that we’ve given too much away is rubbish as far as I’m concerned.” Trade experts said it would be awkward for the UK to maintain contrasting positions in two sets of talks. George Peretz, a barrister at the Monckton legal chambers in London, said: “The provisions on state aid in the EU-Japan FTA create some quite hard-edged commitments not to provide open-ended government support to companies. “If the UK-Japan FTA replicates those provisions, the UK will need to legislate to ensure that British public bodies do not contravene them. That could well compromise the UK’s negotiating position with the EU, where it has not offered anything like that level of commitment.” Recommended The FT ViewThe editorial board UK-Japan trade deal shows need for EU pact But some lawyers also stressed that the subsidy rules in the Japan bilateral deal were still weak compared with the detailed and invasive EU state aid regime. James Webber, a partner at the law firm Shearman & Sterling, said: “It’s a concession of sorts by the UK, but if this is where the negotiations end up, it will be much closer to the UK’s view of the world than the EU’s.” A government spokesperson said: “In all our trade negotiations, including with the EU and with Japan, we consistently make proposals which provide for open and fair competition, on the basis of high standards, in a way which is appropriate to a modern free trade agreement between sovereign and autonomous equals.”

What a load of illiterate twaddle -- Is it true that the author of that completely useless sh*te you've copied & pasted doesn't know how to form paragraphs or is it you? 😀

It's fine though, Herminge likes it 🙃

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5 consecutive posts from brexiters with absolutely no substance. 

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from Linda Smith

I still maintain that Remainers voted for what they believed to be the 'status quo' as far as the EU was concerned. Life was all right - why change anything? Thus they simply voted to remain, looking no further. Leavers, on the other hand, because they didn't accept there was a 'status quo', didn't trust the EU, did their research and voted accordingly for change, and independence, to break free of what we could see was an 'organisation' that was morphing in an alarming way.
Now the cat is out of the bag, and we can ALL see exactly what the EU is - sinister, greedy, corrupt, undemocratic, imperialistic, expansionist, belligerent and coercive - it seems to be the Remainers who are terrified. Terrified to admit they were wrong, terrified by the lies of Project Fear, terrified at the idea that there is a big world out there beyond their EU's borders.

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7 hours ago, Jools said:

Sir David Frost spells out firmly and publicly exactly what the EU negotiating team is up to and why it is necessary to legally pass legislation depriving the bloc of the power to effectively cut off one part of the United Kingdom from importing food from another part of the United Kingdom:

image.thumb.png.e22409ef8fc384ebc759785ea94a2889.png

 

Edited by Herman

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9 hours ago, Jools said:

Sir David Frost spells out firmly and publicly exactly what the EU negotiating team is up to and why it is necessary to legally pass legislation depriving the bloc of the power to effectively cut off one part of the United Kingdom from importing food from another part of the United Kingdom:

image.thumb.png.e22409ef8fc384ebc759785ea94a2889.png

More Comedy Genius from @Jools. This is the same David Frost that negotiated the Withdrawal Treaty that the Brexiteers think is so bad, he actually negotiated the border in the Irish Sea. Howcome he such an expert now?

Not only that he tweated how proud he was of his work!

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1 hour ago, BigFish said:

More Comedy Genius from @Jools. This is the same David Frost that negotiated the Withdrawal Treaty that the Brexiteers think is so bad, he actually negotiated the border in the Irish Sea. Howcome he such an expert now?

Not only that he tweated how proud he was of his work!

None of those who negotiated believed that the EU would play such underhand hand they are playing now ! 

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14 minutes ago, SwindonCanary said:

 

You are led by the nose aren't you? A lamb to the slaughter.

You'll believe any old rubbish that supports your malevolent views.   

You are being played, being had hook line and sinker by Johnson and his washed up government and media supporters desperately finding excuses and others to blame for their total world class incompetence. What do you think EU will do - place gunboats in the Irish sea - or is that next weeks story for the likes of you? All the EU expect is for Johnson to honour (not a word in Johnson's vocabulary sadly) HIS agreement. No more no less.

Get real, engage brain and stop embarrassing  yourself.

Edited by Yellow Fever
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2 minutes ago, Yellow Fever said:

 

You are led by the nose aren't you? A lamb to the slaughter.

You'll believe any old rubbish that supports your malevolent views.   

You are being played, being had hook line and sinker by Johnson and his washed up government and media supporters desperately finding excuses and others to blame for their total world class incompetence. What do you think EU will do - place gunboats in the Irish sea - or is that next weeks story for the likes of you? All the EU expect is for Johnson to honour (not a word in Johnson's vocabulary sadly) HIS agreement. No more no less.

Get real, engage brian and stop embarrassing  yourself.

Al the EU have to do is put it in the agreement, but they refuse that = I wonder why  ?

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43 minutes ago, SwindonCanary said:

Al the EU have to do is put it in the agreement, but they refuse that = I wonder why  ?

A bit of a long explanation but that's what is required, Johnson agreed to the measures, now he's trying to change it.

 

Under the Northern Ireland protocol in the withdrawal agreement agreed and ratified last year, Northern Ireland will in effect stay in the single market and follow EU standards in goods at the end of the transition period, while the rest of the UK exits and does its own thing on standards.

Under the agreement, the EU’s customs code would also be enforced on goods entering Northern Ireland from Great Britain, although Northern Ireland would stay in the UK’s customs territory. This “in-out” arrangement was agreed in order to prevent a customs border being implemented on the island of Ireland.

In the event of a wider trade deal not being agreed by the EU and the UK this year, that could mean tariffs being applied to goods entering Northern Ireland from Great Britain if they are deemed “at risk” of entering the Republic of Ireland at a later point.

Tariffs would be repayable to importers where it could be proven that the goods had not gone over the border into the Republic. But tariffs and checks would be done in the first instance, creating barriers to trade between Northern Ireland and Great Britain.

This outcome was the reason Theresa May, as prime minister, had been adamantly against any such customs border between the four nations of the UK.

However, to make this more palatable to the British side, it had been agreed that a joint EU-UK committee would analyse the range of goods that move from Great Britain to Northern Ireland.

It was hoped that a decision could be made on whether some ranges of goods were “at risk” of entering the Republic before they were exported. For example, the UK government argued that goods being exported into Northern Ireland to be sold in British supermarket chains in the province should not be deemed “at risk” of entering the south of the island of Ireland.

The negotiations on what goods are deemed “at risk” are ongoing. But under the Northern Ireland protocol agreed by Johnson, a failure to agree on it would end in a default position of all goods entering from Great Britain being regarded as “at risk”, and therefore attracting tariffs.

The prime minister has said that this would be an “extreme interpretation of the Northern Ireland protocol” and that it would “impose a full-scale trade border down the Irish Sea”. In reality, it is simply what was agreed.

But Johnson is no longer comfortable with what was agreed. The internal market bill would overrule key clauses, leaving the decision of what is “at risk” in the hands of British ministers.

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2 minutes ago, SwindonCanary said:

At first he did not try to change it, he just wanted to add to it,that they could not stop blocking the shipments 

There is no blocking of shipments, all that will happen under the agreement is that tariffs will be applied if the criteria for 'at risk' goods is not met.

 

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1 minute ago, A Load of Squit said:

There is no blocking of shipments, all that will happen under the agreement is that tariffs will be applied if the criteria for 'at risk' goods is not met.

 

And that was the threat Barnier gave if we did not agree a deal 

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2 minutes ago, SwindonCanary said:

And that was the threat Barnier gave if we did not agree a deal 

Without a doubt SWINDO is the dumbest FVCKWIT on the planet..whichever the planet he lives on is.

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