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SwearyCanary

Pinkun - Propaganda or Proper Paper?

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20 minutes ago, Mengo said:

Keep your head down SwearyCanary apparently there gunning for you. The sh!t could soon hit the Fan.

Maybe you take some time off and do some mountain climbing. I'll have a whip round for you to get the required finances so you can F*ck off up Everest out the way. That way you can't really cause any more damage. Good luck in your future ventures. Sorry you've blown it here. Take as much time out as you need. We will survive. 🕷🤣

 

That went south fast 😂😂😂

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1 hour ago, PurpleCanary said:

I can think of one cricketer who by all accounts was academically very unremarkable, and left school at 15 or 16, but had the sporting intelligence to make the most of his fairly limited ability to end up playing for England.

Would be interested to know who you are talking about here.

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12 hours ago, Parma Ham's gone mouldy said:

Rather than deflection or polyanna humming, why not embrace the opportunity to explain and educate?

This is an excellent point. And something you think that Webber in particular would be up for.

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31 minutes ago, Robert N. LiM said:

This is an excellent point. And something you think that Webber in particular would be up for.

This principle was the raison d’être, the essence of the Parma’s Masterclasses. 

Floods of comments and questions such as ‘what are they doing up at Colney?’ Or ‘why does x play or x not play’ or ‘why are they set up like that’ or ‘what is the intention of their positioning or movement’ or ‘why does x tactic suit y player’? et al actually do have answers. A coach’s intention, methodologies, preferences and principles are generally pretty clear, pretty quickly. 

The intention could be explained. ‘Clueless’ Chris Hughton was actually anything but for example. 

Explanation does not necessarily constitute agreement, validation, endorsement or indeed the diametric opposite. 

I always felt such explanation was valuable, stimulating and mostly unavailable. Particularly when there was a new model, a Marmite manager like Hughton, a positional play adherent like Farke…new, interesting,  emotionally-charged, open to interpretation and indeed misunderstanding and confusion.

 

31 minutes ago, Robert N. LiM said:

 

13 hours ago, Parma Ham's gone mouldy said:

Rather than deflection or polyanna humming, why not embrace the opportunity to explain and educate?

 


Why wouldn’t you want to do it?

  Parma 

Edited by Parma Ham's gone mouldy

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15 hours ago, Parma Ham's gone mouldy said:

The bit in bold always looked like the truth of the model proctor hoc.

Rashica was the only true Premier-ready purchase, the other major asset additions low-risk longer-term appreciators that might make a dent at the top level

It was a recognition that such finances - and indeed Buendias - might not actually come around so often. That the next Buendia would have to be part-bought part-grown. 

A couple of issues here really. To many, Rashica wasn't Premier League-ready at the start of the season. Not helped by missing most of pre-season admittedly. I think it's fair to say that he didn't really get going until getting on for a third of the way through the season.

Buendia himself was part-bought, part-grown. I think that's the frustrating bit about people seemingly thinking he was easy to replace, just find another £1.5m bargain again. In reality, he had a season in the Championship to prepare him for the premier league. He needed that season as he didn't start off amazingly. Imagine if the premier league had been his first season and he played the same... would have been miles off.

And to be fair, he improved each season with us. There were still some glaring issues when he played in the premier league season. Still took on too many players then sat slapping the ground when it didn't come off. Still gave the ball away in deep positions - stats say these gave more opposition goals than any of our other players. That doesn't detract from his attacking play. But for me, his best all round season was last season, when he appeared to mature, cut out the silly stuff, get up and track back and was far more consistent.

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15 hours ago, Parma Ham's gone mouldy said:

‘….più in alto siamo messi, più umilmente dovremmo camminare….’

Parma 

Blimey, Parma, that is spooky. How did you know that is the PurpleCanary family motto?! Although as the black bird(?) of the brood I tend to go more by "Solo i piccoli pagano le tasse."🤩

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19 hours ago, PurpleCanary said:

Good posts from Taiwan and Parma. I have made the point before that the only truly great attacking player I can think of who made a top-class manager was Cruyff, who was indeed brought up in the world of Total Football.

The question of intelligence intelligence versus sporting intelligence is interesting. I can think of one cricketer who by all accounts was academically very unremarkable, and left school at 15 or 16, but had the sporting intelligence to make the most of his fairly limited ability to end up playing for England.

And he proved to be a tactically very astute captain of one of the best First-Class county sides. Which is not an easy gig. Rooney looks like he might be a bit of a footballing equivalent as a manager.

PS. "Spitballing"? O tempora, o mores, o Parma...🤓

Good Times

 Ray Illingworth's England side in 1970–71 were mentally the toughest English side I played against, and the experience of playing against them first up in my Test career reinforced what I had learnt in the backyard. Test cricket was not for the faint of heart. Illingworth subjected us to a mental intimidation by aggressive field placings, and physical intimidation by constant use of his pace attack, ably led by one of the best fast bowlers of my experience, Jon Snow Winning to Illingworth was something he expected of himself and demanded of his team.

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10 hours ago, PurpleCanary said:

Blimey, Parma, that is spooky. How did you know that is the PurpleCanary family motto?! Although as the black bird(?) of the brood I tend to go more by "Solo i piccoli pagano le tasse."🤩

Not as as elegantly Cicerian as the previous offerings, though arguably more of the zeitgeist…

Parma

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I was thinking about 2 aspects of this thread:

1. Mason Mount is a footballer who I have struggled to appreciate,  I have heard that coaches love him because of his ability to take on and carry out instructions. Perhaps Parma could give me some specific examples/things that I should pay attention to in order to greater understand his high regard.

2. There is obviously a demand for more in depth/ analytical coverage of football in England.  I am very grateful to Parma in this regard, he is someone who has a better knowledge and understanding than me but, more importantly, he is able to transmit that knowledge and understanding in a a way that I can digest. 

I can only hope that this demand can overtake the ”motd” paradigm. 

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2 hours ago, Taiwan Canary said:

I was thinking about 2 aspects of this thread:

1. Mason Mount is a footballer who I have struggled to appreciate,  I have heard that coaches love him because of his ability to take on and carry out instructions. Perhaps Parma could give me some specific examples/things that I should pay attention to in order to greater understand his high regard.

2. There is obviously a demand for more in depth/ analytical coverage of football in England.  I am very grateful to Parma in this regard, he is someone who has a better knowledge and understanding than me but, more importantly, he is able to transmit that knowledge and understanding in a a way that I can digest. 

I can only hope that this demand can overtake the ”motd” paradigm. 

That is very kind of you Taiwan 🇹🇼…let me have a go at 1.

I personally wouldn’t call Mount a ‘weapon’. I would however suggest that he is a coach’s dream, an excellent player. There is a difference.

Mount is a player that is something of a holy grail in Italy. Beckham at his peak would have been a fine example too (he was also a weapon as well). Someone who can deliver game-changing moments such as assists and goals, whilst giving nothing away defensively or tactically

It would be true to say that even Buendia - who we loved - was something of a compromise at the top level. He may always be so. He can give the ball away in poor areas, flail with his hands in the air as a decision goes against him - and the action continues around him, without him. 

Mount (and Beckham) are diligent, tactically aware, defensively sound, can run, tackle, pass and - on top of all of that - add assists and goals. Think of it - as Italians do - as a maths equation: what you get in a player vs what you compromise on.

Good Coaches are forever working this equation in their minds, on everything from selection, formation, tactics, purchases, sales, opposition, …plus what they have and what they lack as a collective, a team, a squad…over a whole season (factoring in injury records, what are key positions for the formation, set up and players chosen…et al…et al…). Focusing only on what a player can do - such as lovely Onel - is a luxury only fans can afford.

With Mount you don’t really have to do this. He is going to do everything correctly, he will be responsible, he will work hard, he will give nothing away tactically, he will be positionally sound - so the equation vs the opposition is currently at least zero balanced at worst - then he may well make a cute pass, arrive late in the box and score a goal, spot the opportunity to drift into a false 9 position and disrupt the opposition to score or - just by making that move - create the space for someone else to make an assist or score. 

It is something of a no lose bet. 

Parma 

Caveat: no coach worries about an opposition player scoring an incredible goal from 25 yards or similar. These outlier events are factored in and discounted. There is no ‘mistake’ tactically or technically here (mostly)

Edited by Parma Ham's gone mouldy
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Thanks Parma, this is exactly the level of of analysis that I was alluding to in part 2 of my comment. 

32 minutes ago, Parma Ham's gone mouldy said:

no coach worries about an opposition player scoring an incredible goal from 25 yards or similar

No doubt Roberto Mancini is looking into the depths of his soul thinking about this today.

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On 24/03/2022 at 13:09, PurpleCanary said:

Blimey, Parma, that is spooky. How did you know that is the PurpleCanary family motto?! Although as the black bird(?) of the brood I tend to go more by "Solo i piccoli pagano le tasse."🤩

Leona Helmsley likes that. Me, as an ABBA fan I'll raise you a "sub luna saltamus".

Bonus points if you know which song that's from without Googling it.

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20 minutes ago, TheGunnShow said:

Leona Helmsley likes that. Me, as an ABBA fan I'll raise you a "sub luna saltamus".

Bonus points if you know which song that's from without Googling it.

I'm an ABBA fan but I can only guess that it's not Dancing Queen! Talking of Scandinavians, this reminds me of what my Norwegian nanny used to say when confronted by human idiocy:

"Bedre en elg med bakrus enn en tosk med samvittighet."

"Better a moose with a hangover than a fool with a conscience."

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1 hour ago, PurpleCanary said:

I'm an ABBA fan but I can only guess that it's not Dancing Queen! Talking of Scandinavians, this reminds me of what my Norwegian nanny used to say when confronted by human idiocy:

"Bedre en elg med bakrus enn en tosk med samvittighet."

"Better a moose with a hangover than a fool with a conscience."

They're dry and droll beggars from my experience, the Norwegians. Pretty funny when they're in the mood.

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