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Arlene Foster Resigns

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Seems the party wants someoneone who is significantly more to the right than Arlene. That's going to go well.

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A tough choice. An angry, Bible bashing loon or an angrier Bible bashing loon. 

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On 29/04/2021 at 21:38, keelansgrandad said:

Just read his bio.

Oh my. 

We are going back to the Crusades

We’ve had the children’s crusade so why not a Fruitcakes Crusade. 

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Strange really, Poots doesn't believe in dinosaurs yet all he needs to do is look in a mirror. 

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People believe all sorts of weird things. There's some just south of here who believe 1p5wich Town are the Pride of Anglia.

More to be pitied than blamed.

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Posted (edited)

 

Image

@HenleyAdam

Edited by Herman
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If it's a DUP vote, surely they would vote NO against the candidate they didn't like and the candidate with the least NOs would get elected? ūüėõ

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A biblical quote most apt for the DUP supporting Brexit.

Hosea 8:7 "For they haue sowen the winde, and they shall reape the whirlewinde‚ÄĚ.

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51 minutes ago, MooreMarriot said:

Wow, that was quick especially for a nutjob like Poots.

I imagine that Sinn Fein can scarely believe their luck, they don't even need to do any serious campaigning - just hang around sounding fairly sane whilst Johnson & Poots do all the heavy lifting towards a Sinn Fein win in the Assembly elections next year and the vote on Irish re-unification that will follow.

Still, not all bads news for Johnson - give Irish re-unification a helping hand and his problems with the Northern Ireland Protocol all disappear ūüėÄ

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I I I I I, have always supported unification.

Translated as

I have an 80 seat majority so don't need those fecking Paddies.

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I am not sure that re-unification is a realistic prospect. The recent history of Ireland has been formed by generations of division, it is undoubtedly a just cause that Ireland should be one Sovereign state, but four hundred years of settlers from the rest of the UK led to the partition on modern lines.

I often stop wonder what the World's reaction to Ireland would be if the indigenous population had a different skin colour.

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1 hour ago, Daz Sparks said:

I am not sure that re-unification is a realistic prospect. The recent history of Ireland has been formed by generations of division, it is undoubtedly a just cause that Ireland should be one Sovereign state, but four hundred years of settlers from the rest of the UK led to the partition on modern lines.

Its a fair point but despite that long history of British settlers and the fact that there is now a very deeply entrenched group of 'British'/Uniomist people, when you look at it in the overall context of Ireland they are quite a small group - even within Northern Ireland they are now reckoned to be a minority (the die-hards even more so) and so as far as the island of Ireland is concerned they are probably only around 15%. - so they more and more look almost like a handful of British ghettos in what is essentially an Irish country.

Other key factors that contribute to re-unification being realistic are surely the Good Friday agreement which I think it is generally acknowledged has led to far closer integration, both socially and economically, between Northern and Southern Ireland than was the case 20 years ago.

Finally of course there is our old friend Brexit - let's not forget that Ireland is one of the most deeply committed of the 27 to the EU and Northern Ireland voted to Remain. So that was already a fairly clear background before Johnson threw NI under the bus with the NI protocol - that will (has) undoubtedly caused trouble with the Unionist diehards who quite rightly believe they have been betrayed by Johnson and the DUP. But I suspect to many moderate Unionists it is further confirmation of what they already knew but didn't care to admit - their interests would be better server by being a minor but still very significant partner in a united Ireland thriving within the EU rather than being a second (actually third or fourth) class expendable partner in the UK which is struggling and failing totally, as we knew they would, to deliver the promised benefits of Brexit.

Like you I do believe that the history is a powerful force but I think that so much has changed in Ireland in recent years that those historical factors have also changed\reversed and things are now heading in a different diection, although at what speed remains to be seen.

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4 hours ago, Creative Midfielder said:

Its a fair point but despite that long history of British settlers and the fact that there is now a very deeply entrenched group of 'British'/Uniomist people, when you look at it in the overall context of Ireland they are quite a small group - even within Northern Ireland they are now reckoned to be a minority (the die-hards even more so) and so as far as the island of Ireland is concerned they are probably only around 15%. - so they more and more look almost like a handful of British ghettos in what is essentially an Irish country.

Other key factors that contribute to re-unification being realistic are surely the Good Friday agreement which I think it is generally acknowledged has led to far closer integration, both socially and economically, between Northern and Southern Ireland than was the case 20 years ago.

Finally of course there is our old friend Brexit - let's not forget that Ireland is one of the most deeply committed of the 27 to the EU and Northern Ireland voted to Remain. So that was already a fairly clear background before Johnson threw NI under the bus with the NI protocol - that will (has) undoubtedly caused trouble with the Unionist diehards who quite rightly believe they have been betrayed by Johnson and the DUP. But I suspect to many moderate Unionists it is further confirmation of what they already knew but didn't care to admit - their interests would be better server by being a minor but still very significant partner in a united Ireland thriving within the EU rather than being a second (actually third or fourth) class expendable partner in the UK which is struggling and failing totally, as we knew they would, to deliver the promised benefits of Brexit.

Like you I do believe that the history is a powerful force but I think that so much has changed in Ireland in recent years that those historical factors have also changed\reversed and things are now heading in a different diection, although at what speed remains to be seen.

I certainly take on board what you have expressed there CM, and your point regarding closer integration since the Good Friday agreement is a perspective I hadn't thought about too deeply. What does come mind though, is the fact that the entrenched sectarian division that pervaded the province from the late 1960s through to the mid 90s is still absolutely within living memory, and a significant number of the protagonists still exist on both sides. Lest we forget, the UDA  and UVF as well the IRA have plenty of blood on their hands.

Unification however would seem to be the most satisfactory outcome in the long term for all concerned if it could be obtained through consensus, which I believe has been set out previously, at a time I can't quite remember. 

I may be totally calling wrong CM, and unification could be achieved in the not too distant future and peacefully, but as I refer earlier, Republicans and Loyalists both have some deeply fanatical individuals in their midst, willing to do anything to attempt to derail something that doesn't align with their agenda.

I'll end on a positive note, and that it is heartening to have sensible and informed debate on a subject, to which I look forward to more of.

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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, Daz Sparks said:

I certainly take on board what you have expressed there CM, and your point regarding closer integration since the Good Friday agreement is a perspective I hadn't thought about too deeply. What does come mind though, is the fact that the entrenched sectarian division that pervaded the province from the late 1960s through to the mid 90s is still absolutely within living memory, and a significant number of the protagonists still exist on both sides. Lest we forget, the UDA  and UVF as well the IRA have plenty of blood on their hands.

Unification however would seem to be the most satisfactory outcome in the long term for all concerned if it could be obtained through consensus, which I believe has been set out previously, at a time I can't quite remember. 

I may be totally calling wrong CM, and unification could be achieved in the not too distant future and peacefully, but as I refer earlier, Republicans and Loyalists both have some deeply fanatical individuals in their midst, willing to do anything to attempt to derail something that doesn't align with their agenda.

I'll end on a positive note, and that it is heartening to have sensible and informed debate on a subject, to which I look forward to more of.

Its not so much about those that are still alive but the history of violence  and perceptions of sectarianism that is entrenched in the collective memory of both communities, it can be reignited with passion and resurface with very little provocation.

Edited by Van wink

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20 minutes ago, Van wink said:

Its not so much about those that are still alive but the history of violence  and perceptions of sectarianism that is entrenched in the collective memory of both communities, it can be reignited with passion and resurface with very little provocation.

Yes, precisely what a lot of people had been warning about.ūü§®

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25 minutes ago, Herman said:

Yes, precisely what a lot of people had been warning about.ūü§®

Yes indeed, shouldn’t be used as a political football or bargaining chip.

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55 minutes ago, Van wink said:

Its not so much about those that are still alive but the history of violence  and perceptions of sectarianism that is entrenched in the collective memory of both communities, it can be reignited with passion and resurface with very little provocation.

I'm not sure it matters where and whence it comes from VW, the fact it is there, is most pertinent. 

 

36 minutes ago, Herman said:

Yes, precisely what a lot of people had been warning about.ūü§®

Agreed Herman, and I think I have pointed this out in earlier posts. 

 

11 minutes ago, Van wink said:

Yes indeed, shouldn’t be used as a political football or bargaining chip.

Not for one moment.

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4 minutes ago, Daz Sparks said:

I'm not sure it matters where and whence it comes from VW, the fact it is there, is most pertinent. 

 

Indeed, making it highly unlikely that unification is in the slightest bit possible for the foreseeable future, upon which we agree I believe.

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1 minute ago, Van wink said:

Indeed, making it highly unlikely that unification is in the slightest bit possible for the foreseeable future, upon which we agree I believe.

Realistically yes, but ultimately, I believe it would be in the best interests of all if could be peacefully attained.

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