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A6B10900-C43F-4642-85EC-61B5CCED5BC1.thumb.jpeg.c8c829198614438193e86d2c1af7825e.jpegWas there in Parliament Square Great night apart from the rain Long live The United Kingdom

Edited by daly
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We are out of one of the biggest gravy trains ever.

 

Expense fiddles of unequal performance.

 

If some uninformed people want to pay their taxes to fund it then it's up to them.

 

I don't (didn't.)

Edited by BroadstairsR

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Personally I don't see why people who want to stay within the EU are making so much fuss. It's not like the British Isles have been towed across the Atlantic and now sit 25 miles off the coast of New York.

The EU still maintains a policy of welcoming immigrants with open arms, no matter who you are. France alone welcomes between 100,000 - 200,000 immigrants a year, from all walks of life. If you wish to stay in the EU, by all means do. After all France is only a few hours away by train. It's harder to get to Northern Ireland.

Of course, I appreciate not all those who voted to stay in the EU would be able to emigrate to sunnier climes. Particularly those on the Norwich City board, as fans are vehemently opposed to foreigners owning the club.

 

 

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i find all the strong feelings- for or against- towards membership of a largely economic and political union frankly baffling. 

England isn't leaving Europe, most of our lives wont change at all. A lot of nonsense all round stoked by media and ignorance. 

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39 minutes ago, Dean Coneys boots said:

i find all the strong feelings- for or against- towards membership of a largely economic and political union frankly baffling. 

England isn't leaving Europe, most of our lives wont change at all. A lot of nonsense all round stoked by media and ignorance. 

Altogether depends what you made of membership really. I spent 6 months living and volunteering in Turkey as part of an EU project. Met friends from all over Europe and had one of my Turkish friends visiting literally 3 weeks ago - I came back to England 10 years ago. One of my German friends from over there had spent a year in Finland aged 15 as part of another EU project for year long high school exchanges.

I was also part of another EU-funded project which took 35 vulnerable young people who had just exited the care system to Poland for a Multi-lateral youth exchange where we met with groups from 6 other countries and worked on intercultural understanding. Those kids had had **** lives and most had never been out of the country before - it was a huge milestone experience for them and probably the best experience of their lives at that point in time.

Turkey was a life changing experience for me. My daughter won't have that opportunity because "sovereignty". Kids leaving the care system next week won't have the opportunity that the group we had took.

For people who embraced the EU, and took advantage, we've actually lost quite a lot, and that's without even talking about the economic impact which assuredly will have a significant impact on millions of British people's lives... so I think in this instance, it's you talking from a position of ignorance.

Edited by kick it off
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We, as individual citizens, will be significantly less free when Brexit is actually "done"

(unless we remain in the Single Market and retain Freedom of Movement - which seems incredibly unlikely)

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1 hour ago, Dean Coneys boots said:

i find all the strong feelings- for or against- towards membership of a largely economic and political union frankly baffling. 

England isn't leaving Europe, most of our lives wont change at all. A lot of nonsense all round stoked by media and ignorance. 

Absolutely right. Nothing will change. 

...except we might be eating poorer quality food when food standards are watered down as part of a trade agreement...

...and workers rights are diluted to make us more competitive in the global market...

...and to travel within the EU we will need travel documentation like a visa waiver program...

...and movement of goods across borders will become clad in red tape causing lorries to queue on the approach to ports...

...and we no longer have the right to live and work within other European countries...

...and EU funding will no longer be as readily available to support local causes, projects and businesses, affecting lives and jobs...

...and parts of the UK (Scotland and Northern Ireland) could well seek independence leaving England and Wales further isolated and irrelevant on the world stage...

All of these things could happen. Indeed some are more likely than not to happen. To suggest most of our lives won’t change is utterly incorrect. All of our lives will change. We wait now to see just how much.

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Please just leave this s&£@ alone.

 

the thread that was on here before with a million replies was pure cringe

 

its done, everyone just get on with your lives and stop being so easily divided. Try and use your brain and be an individual rather than falling into a tribe because you are easily influenced? Try not to be a useful idiot maybe?

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It's a mixed blessing. There were some very good reasons for being in the EU and there were some good reasons for leaving and anyone who believes it will be hugely better being in or out of the EU is deluded imo. 

Truth is that either way is going to be difficult. The EU has huge issues to deal with and will struggle to cope with them all - and we were right in the middle of that. Being out though will give us huge problems to deal with too........ so no winners imo and no losers - things will be different, that's all. 

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10 hours ago, Feedthewolf said:

No chance of signing Quagliarella now.

Hah! Actually we probably would be able still to sign the likes of Quagliarella, as an established player. But, and this was a serious point I made back on I think the first page of the Brexit thread that eventually got zapped, the kind of bargains we have been picking up from the continent, unheralded players with no great track record, the kind of player that has been key to making our self-sustaining model work, the likes of Buendia, Zimmermann and Hernandez, may well be off limits to us from January 2021.

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Cost of Brexit  £203 bn (Bloomberg analysis) whilst contributions UK has made 1973 to 2020 has been £215 bn. And costs have not finished yet let alone the legacy. 

A decision of such masochistic proportions. Only 4% of people ever thought that the EU was a problem pre referendum. The vested interests really running the country have successfully fooled millions, supported and fuelled by a press owned by billionaires and a few strange Tory / right ideologists.

I realise this post will turn half of conservative (with a small c) Norfolk posters against me and I therefore apologise for having such strong views. In my previous job I occasionally had the chance to meet and talk with Swedish, Dutch, German, French Finnish people etc who would be extremely open-minded and in my mother language they would explain how their countries were tackling social and economic problems. Through this they gave me an insight into what was important to them as people, as family members, societies even. It was a humbling privilege and I felt part of a greater (and certainly) good whole. I guess it's possible to retain but when you're not in the club anymore you become marginalised and isolated. I'm very sad. And I believe the country won't heal from this self-inflicted hurt for decades. The real winners are venture capitalists not ordinary people. But hey-ho, who the hell am I to say anything I suppose.

 

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45 minutes ago, sonyc said:

 Only 4% of people ever thought that the EU was a problem pre referendum.

I'd love to see you explain your methodology for calculating that only 4% had a problem with the EU pre-referendum.

We already know that is a load of big hairy sweaty b0llocks because UKIP won the most votes in the 2014 European Elections and took 33% of the UK seats in the European Parliament with 26.6% of the vote.

Going back to the 2009 European Elections and UKIP took 16.5% of the vote and 18.8% of the seats.

That's because before you add the votes of the various fringe parties which also took a strong anti-EU stance in those two elections, parties like NO2EU, and without considering that roughly half of the Conservative membership base have been Eurosceptic for eternity.

Are you merely an innocent but gullible victim of remain campaign disinformation, which has made you look a bit silly by sharing a completely made up statistic, or intentionally propagating false information in the hope that the gullible will swallow it and nobody will pull you up on it?  

Edited by TeemuVanBasten

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Who cars it’s done let’s just move and deal with it.......nothing we can do now...

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12 minutes ago, TeemuVanBasten said:

I'd love to see you explain your methodology for calculating that only 4% had a problem with the EU pre-referendum.

I mean, we already know that is a load of big hairy b0llocks because UKIP won the most votes in the 2014 European Elections and took 33% of the UK seats in the European Parliament with 26.6% of the vote.

Going back to the 2009 European Elections and UKIP took 16.5% of the vote and 18.8% of the seats.

That's because before you add the votes of the various fringe parties which also took a strong anti-EU stance in those two elections, parties like NO2EU, and without considering that roughly half of the Conservative membership base have been Eurosceptic for eternity.

Are you merely an innocent but gullible victim of remain campaign disinformation, which has made you look a bit silly with this completely made up statistic, or intentionally propagating false information in the hope that the gullible will swallow it?  

Probably the first category Teemu Van. I don't ever aim to propogate false information or be intentional in order to influence. I was expressing an emotion in the main part of my post, which I felt was self-evident. Yet, I will seek the source I read about the 4 %. It was based on a source on Twitter and was not from a person with an axe to grind but 'independent' like the Brexit cost quote above (Bloomberg Economics, House of Commons Library).

I'm not talking about Ukip either and their supporters / voters. I'm sure the reference was made in terms of the whole population.

Maybe I've lived in a strange vaccum though. I'm certainly a nobody though Teemu.

Edited by sonyc

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6 minutes ago, Indy said:

Who cars it’s done let’s just move and deal with it.......nothing we can do now...

Agreed. Just have to hope what happens in the next 12 months is constructive and doesn't lead to more political chaos. Like the election result, the real work of negotiation is where the impact will be felt. Let's hope the government is up to it now everyone's stopped the shouting.

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