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paul moy

Wuhan coronavirus

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3 minutes ago, Surfer said:

Some basic health and safety briefings, advertising, and newspaper articles from the government would be a great idea. 

Like wash your hands, don't bother with facemarks, and requests to not hoard as it's not helping anyone to do so. 

 

- Shutting down the Torygraph propaganda sheet for 6 months would also be a great idea too. 

Blimey Surfer, I've seen more information about proper hand washing in the last week than I've seen in my whole life, part of which was spent working in public health!

Where have you been?

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3 hours ago, Van wink said:

Blimey Surfer, I've seen more information about proper hand washing in the last week than I've seen in my whole life, part of which was spent working in public health!

Where have you been?

Well that's good to hear VW. As for me I've been in America. 

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Posted (edited)

Well you don’t need to worry, Donald has everything under control and Mike P is sorting the public information. The very best reassurance!

Trump administration officials on Sunday tried to calm market panic that the coronavirus could cause a global recession, saying the public had over-reacted and that stocks would bounce back due to the underlying strength of the U.S. economy”😀

Edited by Van wink

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Well this issue clearly has not helped. Look forward now to a massively increased testing regime in the US. 

Then we may know where we really are...... from 3,500 tested to 75,000 capacity within the next week. 

But if they have tested 3,500 people and only identified 22 confirmed cases that's only a 0.6% infection rate.

On Thursday afternoon, the concerns about the Atlanta laboratory were raised in a conference call that included senior government officials from multiple agencies including the Department of Health and Human Services, the Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Institutes of Health. 

  • The call’s purpose was to figure out ways to mass produce the testing kits and get them to market quickly. 
  • The Trump administration says it’s now figured out how to get over those hurdles. An HHS spokesperson promised that by the end of this week, “we will have the capacity to test up to 75,000 individuals” for the coronavirus

https://www.axios.com/cdc-lab-coronavirus-contaminated-6dc9726d-dea3-423f-b5ad-eb7b1e44c2e2.html

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7 hours ago, Surfer said:

Well this issue clearly has not helped. Look forward now to a massively increased testing regime in the US. 

Then we may know where we really are...... from 3,500 tested to 75,000 capacity within the next week. 

But if they have tested 3,500 people and only identified 22 confirmed cases that's only a 0.6% infection rate.

On Thursday afternoon, the concerns about the Atlanta laboratory were raised in a conference call that included senior government officials from multiple agencies including the Department of Health and Human Services, the Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Institutes of Health. 

  • The call’s purpose was to figure out ways to mass produce the testing kits and get them to market quickly. 
  • The Trump administration says it’s now figured out how to get over those hurdles. An HHS spokesperson promised that by the end of this week, “we will have the capacity to test up to 75,000 individuals” for the coronavirus

https://www.axios.com/cdc-lab-coronavirus-contaminated-6dc9726d-dea3-423f-b5ad-eb7b1e44c2e2.html

You are looking at 87 in the US now with 2 deaths and 9 in serious or critical condition. Its remarkable how quick this is now exploding. The daily increase will soon be in the hundreds as is happening now in Italy.

Ive been trying to get people to understand  that they need to take responsibility and make basic preparations since 1st Feb. Don't wait for empty shelves there will be a shutdown.

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Surfer “But if they have tested 3,500 people and only identified 22 confirmed cases that's only a 0.6% infection rate.”

Assuming those figures are correct, I believe there have been problems with some of the tests in the US, but even so you will find those figures beginning to increase as associates and local populations near to infected people are tested and also as the virus continues to spread person to person within communities.

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Posted (edited)

It's time this hapless government got ahead of the curve else they will surely take 100% the blame for 500K to 1M OAP deaths. They will reap the whirlwind.

Close schools.

Suspend sporting events and large gatherings.

Bring private hospitals and similar including military resources under NHS control. There will have to to be tough triage and rationing of medical resources.

Start to build emergency field hospitals in closed school gyms etc.

Plans for food distribution, power and heat, emergency services.

Kick Brexit into long grass - it's the statesmanlike thing to do. Bigger fish to fry!

 

If they don't and are not seen to act all will quickly see and blame them for the cuts to the NHS (10 years), staff shortages and Starmer may well be No. 10 much much faster than anybody could have possibly imagined!

Edited by Yellow Fever

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On 01/03/2020 at 07:15, T said:

The infection rate is Hubei is less than 0.1pc and the infection rate in Wuhan is less than 1pc of the population  The overall deaths in Wuhan compared to the population is 0.026pc if we conservatively assumed all China deaths were in Wuhan. Serious. Yes. End of the world No. 

Usually the 'second wave' is more deadly than the first. 

Also I read a lot about Spanish Flu which killed 50 million early last century and it was assumed that it originated in China because the death rate was lower there, that's because they had greater level of immunity against a native threat than outsiders. 

So the death rate in China isn't necessarily a good figure to extrapolate. 

You also have the issue of many countries having poorer health facilities than China. It's not third world and it has a big middle class.

Now in Sudan, Somalia, North Korea, or perhaps even bankrupt Venezuela... Let's see how those cope with the disease. 

It's at times like these that I feel really blessed to live in a first world country. 

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59 minutes ago, Yellow Fever said:

It's time this hapless government got ahead of the curve else they will surely take 100% the blame for 500K to 1M OAP deaths. They will reap the whirlwind.

Close schools.

Suspend sporting events and large gatherings.

Bring private hospitals and similar including military resources under NHS control. There will have to to be tough triage and rationing of medical resources.

Start to build emergency field hospitals in closed school gyms etc.

Plans for food distribution, power and heat, emergency services.

Kick Brexit into long grass - it's the statesmanlike thing to do. Bigger fish to fry!

 

If they don't and are not seen to act all will quickly see and blame them for the cuts to the NHS (10 years), staff shortages and Starmer may well be No. 10 much much faster than anybody could have possibly imagined!

Don't panic Mr Mainwaring.

Prepare sensibly.

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1 hour ago, Yellow Fever said:

 

If they don't and are not seen to act all will quickly see and blame them for the cuts to the NHS (10 years), staff shortages and Starmer may well be No. 10 much much faster than anybody could have possibly imagined!

Not only the repercussions of them messing it up, but also, there won't be any OAPs to vote for them. 

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Posted (edited)
29 minutes ago, ricardo said:

Don't panic Mr Mainwaring.

Prepare sensibly.

I'm not personally panicking at all. I however do expect the government to start to make, and be seen to make, the necessary preparations. If eventually they aren't need then all well and good. If they are and they prepared well in advance then all credit to them - if however they drag their feet, distracted by less urgent events elsewhere, worried about the economic impact blowing up their already out of date spending plans then they'll deserve to be consigned to the dustbin of history. 

Today is a day for action, not yet more prevacation or flowery words.

Edited by Yellow Fever

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They are trying to pump the markets up to create confidence but nobody is fooled. 

There are no treatments, there is no vaccine and there is no herd immunity.

Do your own research.

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55 minutes ago, Yellow Fever said:

I'm not personally panicking at all. I however do expect the government to start to make, and be seen to make, the necessary preparations. If eventually they aren't need then all well and good. If they are and they prepared well in advance then all credit to them - if however they drag their feet, distracted by less urgent events elsewhere, worried about the economic impact blowing up their already out of date spending plans then they'll deserve to be consigned to the dustbin of history. 

Today is a day for action, not yet more prevacation or flowery words.

All the "no deal" Brexit stockpiles now being used to help preparedness for Corona, yet another benefit of Brexit.

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13 minutes ago, ricardo said:

They are trying to pump the markets up to create confidence but nobody is fooled. 

There are no treatments, there is no vaccine and there is no herd immunity.

Do your own research.

Unfortunately it seems that some want the (nanny) state to do everything for them, its no wonder the NHS is under stress.

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There is a significant probability of substantial short term disruption but the harsh reality is that because the disease primarily impacts the old and sick and it is likely that a vaccine will be developed at some point  then it will not have a long term impact on global productivity given it is mainly killing unproductive people. Brutal but Covid 19 will mitigate the challenges of an increasingly ageing unproductive population. Economies and markets do recover from short term shocks. 

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Unfortunately it seems that some want the (nanny) state to do everything for them, its no wonder the NHS is under stress.

I don't believe people have ever done anything than blame someone or some organisation if things go against them. But it cannot be ignored that Governments and their agencies did ignore the signs coming out of China early on. I don't believe it is beyond the realms of such agencies to warn of the possibility that this virus could be less harmful but greater virility than SARS was over a decade ago.
That isn't me making political capital but Joe Public does not have access to 99% of information despite them thinking that Facebook, Twitter etc makes them citizens of the world.
The natural assumption from silence is to consider conspiracy. Like the absence of the Russia Report.

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3 hours ago, Yellow Fever said:

It's time this hapless government got ahead of the curve else they will surely take 100% the blame for 500K to 1M OAP deaths. They will reap the whirlwind.

Close schools.

Suspend sporting events and large gatherings.

Bring private hospitals and similar including military resources under NHS control. There will have to to be tough triage and rationing of medical resources.

Start to build emergency field hospitals in closed school gyms etc.

Plans for food distribution, power and heat, emergency services.

Kick Brexit into long grass - it's the statesmanlike thing to do. Bigger fish to fry!

 

 

Some people just can't let go 🤣🤣

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31 minutes ago, T said:

There is a significant probability of substantial short term disruption but the harsh reality is that because the disease primarily impacts the old and sick and it is likely that a vaccine will be developed at some point  then it will not have a long term impact on global productivity given it is mainly killing unproductive people. Brutal but Covid 19 will mitigate the challenges of an increasingly ageing unproductive population. Economies and markets do recover from short term shocks. 

You seem to be looking forward to a form of state-sponsored euthanasia. Or are you just fishing for a bite?

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1 hour ago, Van wink said:

All the "no deal" Brexit stockpiles now being used to help preparedness for Corona, yet another benefit of Brexit.

It's what people voted for. 

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2 minutes ago, Herman said:

It's what people voted for. 

How far sighted we were😀

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No not at all. This is a serious matter.  Just pointing out the harsh reality to add some context and perspective. 

Decisions are made by reference to actuarial assessments. Otherwise there would be a complete global shutdown every time there was a potential risk. 
 

This may well have some devastating impacts on some people’s lives in the short term but it is unlikely to have a significant long term impact even if it kills off 1pc of the population who are primarily old and sick in a world with a global population of 7.8bn.

 Outbreaks and recovery from diseases are an innate part of the history of mankind which is of course no consolation for those impacted. 

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3 minutes ago, ricardo said:

How far sighted we were😀

It's  the same way that you knew diesel sales would collapse and that the pound was overvalued. 😀

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3 minutes ago, T said:

No not at all. This is a serious matter.  Just pointing out the harsh reality to add some context and perspective. 

Decisions are made by reference to actuarial assessments. Otherwise there would be a complete global shutdown every time there was a potential risk. 
 

This may well have some devastating impacts on some people’s lives in the short term but it is unlikely to have a significant long term impact even if it kills off 1pc of the population who are primarily old and sick in a world with a global population of 7.8bn.

 Outbreaks and recovery from diseases are an innate part of the history of mankind which is of course no consolation for those impacted. 

Do you think resources should be spent on the old and sick when a pandemic strikes, given that there is unlikely to be an economic payback in doing so?

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2 minutes ago, Herman said:

 

It's  the same way that you knew diesel sales would collapse and that the pound was overvalued. 😀

Shouldn't you be out stocking up your shelves.😀

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Nah, I've got a cupboard full of cuppa soups. Plus I have a corner shop that doesn't ever close 2 minutes away. 

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13 minutes ago, ricardo said:

How far sighted we were😀

Dont expect any credit:classic_biggrin:

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1 minute ago, Herman said:

Nah, I've got a cupboard full of cuppa soups. Plus I have a corner shop that doesn't ever close 2 minutes away. 

So its just the ring of armed police you will have to worry about then?😀

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, Herman said:

Nah, I've got a cupboard full of cuppa soups. Plus I have a corner shop that doesn't ever close 2 minutes away. 

And as an addict of cuppa soup you worry about sanitised chicken!!

The Dangers of Instant Soup

 April 12, 2019
Instant soup is one of the most accessible and affordable ready-made foods in the market. However, are they good for us? Find out in the article below.

Instant soup is a fast food that has become quite popular in recent years. It’s an easy and cheap option for people without time to cook and/or eat something healthier. Also, even though people who eat them don’t necessarily consider them healthy, they tend to believe they are healthier than other fast foods.

However, people don’t know that this isn’t the case.

 You cannot easily digest instant soup

Studies have found that instant noodles remain intact in the stomach even after two hours. This is a lot more time compared to other types of homemade noodles. This has many implications in terms of digestion since your stomach doesn’t usually hold food for so long.

First, the digestive system can experience strong tension. This is true because it has to work for hours to digest these highly processed foods. When a food remains in the digestive tract for a long time, it also impacts the absorption of nutrients. Keep in mind that noodles and instant soups don’t offer many nutritional benefits.

Instead of nutrients, this type of food has a long list of additives, including the toxic preservative tertiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ). It’s very likely that this additive stays in the stomach with the noodles. This can potentially cause serious health problems as it’s digested with the noodles themselves.

Only 5 grams of the TBHQ preservative can be lethal

Tertiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) preservative is a petroleum byproduct that can be tricky since it often appears as an “antioxidant”. However, consumers need to understand that even though synthetic chemicals can have antioxidant properties, they’re never the same as natural ones. Synthetic “antioxidants” stop the oxidation of fats and oils, lengthening the shelf life ofprocessed foods.

Most processed foods, from most brands, use TBHQ. In addition, varnishes, lacquers, insecticides, make-up, and perfumes often contain it in order to lower the evaporation rate and make the substances more stable. Experts have found that as little as 5 grams of this additive can be lethal. In fact, the Dictionary of Food Additives states that being exposed to one gram of TBHQ can cause symptoms such as:

  • nausea and vomiting
  • ringing in the ears
  • delirium
  • a feeling of asphyxiation

 

A recent study published in the Journal of Nutrition showed that women who ate greater amounts of instant soup had a higher risk of metabolic syndrome. This was compared to those who ate less, regardless of other eating habits or exercise. According to this study, the women that consumed instant soup twice a week were 68% more likely to get metabolic syndromewhich leads to many other more serious diseases like obesity, arterial hypertension, high blood sugar, triglycerides, and low levels of the good HDL cholesterol. Also, people that ate more instant soup had lower amounts of important nutrients, such as:

  • protein
  • calcium
  • phosphorous
  • iron
  • potassium
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin C

Furthermore, the levels of bad fats, calories, and sodium were higher.

Edited by Van wink
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I wonder if the thousands of Syrian refugees now believing their (false) dream is coming true would quite happily take all the Instant soup and noodle cups off our shelves. That is if they can get to them before all the students.

One man's lifestyle spoiler is another man's survival kit.

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