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34 minutes ago, A Load of Squit said:

What will the MOS come up with this week to try and smear SKS?

 

He travelled to the bathroom from his lounge which is just disgusting and he likes French cheese.

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2 hours ago, keelansgrandad said:

He travelled to the bathroom from his lounge which is just disgusting and he likes French cheese.

To continue the French theme.........my original feeling about Starmer was no more than he was clearly the best of a very poor field of candidates for the Labour leadership. Its already obvious that I got that wrong as he has very quickly demonstrated that he is much more than that. But the last few weeks have also reminded me of Napolean's famous quote that 'he would rather have a general who was lucky than one who was good'.

Starmer appears to be both very lucky and very capable and thank heavens for having an opposition again - we're certainly going to need one desperately for the next four years!

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Johnson needs his braying donkeys back to support him but at the moment I think they will be backing Baker's call for Cummings to.go.

The tightrope Boris has been walking is now gossamer.

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2 things from today. Johnson hates scrutiny and questioning. His tactics are very obvious. 

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Just now, Herman said:

2 things from today. Johnson hates scrutiny and questioning. His tactics are very obvious. 

Starmer really got under his skin today. Long may it continue.

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For somebody who fancies himself as an orator, if you took away the I I I's he wouldn't have anything to say.

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He very nearly had a "get stuffed" moment. Great to hear.

 

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I loved how SKS said he mailed the PM in confidence because he didn't want to embarrass him.

Then Barry Gardiner goes and does the idiotic act of joining the protest through London. Stop trying to get votes that way. If you had addressed the protest from a social distance then fair enough, good idea. But not mixing with them.

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Strangly Johnson/Cummings seems to have retained 40% support (much like Trump), although the honeymoon period is clearly over as is the post election bounce. That said Starmer's satisfaction ratings for a new leader and during a national emmergency are fantastic. Question is how long does this go on before his attributes are recognised by 2019 Tory voters?

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, BigFish said:

Strangly Johnson/Cummings seems to have retained 40% support (much like Trump), although the honeymoon period is clearly over as is the post election bounce. That said Starmer's satisfaction ratings for a new leader and during a national emmergency are fantastic. Question is how long does this go on before his attributes are recognised by 2019 Tory voters?

Answer - when they are made redundant and the long paid furlough holiday ends.

Edited by Yellow Fever

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Answer - when they are made redundant and the long paid furlough holiday ends.

Just like the homeless who are now going to be kicked back on the streets

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3 hours ago, Yellow Fever said:

Answer - when they are made redundant and the long paid furlough holiday ends.

 

3 hours ago, keelansgrandad said:

Answer - when they are made redundant and the long paid furlough holiday ends.

Just like the homeless who are now going to be kicked back on the streets

Sadly, I think even then the EU and the virus will get the blame.

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Have the LibDems had all the confidence kicked out of them or just given up even trying?

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Posted (edited)

I’m totally non political bias and have to say Starmer certainly is the best Labour leader in a long time.

Shame that politicians don’t actually do what they are all elected to do, which is what’s best for the country by working together....rather than what they can do for themselves.

Edited by Indy

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On 03/06/2020 at 15:52, keelansgrandad said:

For somebody who fancies himself as an orator, if you took away the I I I's he wouldn't have anything to say.

Johnson takes the floor (with the same hairstyle)

(rather loud)

 

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1 hour ago, BigFish said:

image.thumb.png.4bec4d1d427251f3482bfbde18501d60.png

odd, some old codger was only telling us a few days ago how the Cummings effect had quickly worn off

Survation are the most accurate,as they use a different method - it is thought they were the source for the money made on referendum night, by releasing  exit polling before 10pm

However the figures above are not really any surprise given the incompetence on show - and I suspect they will continue changing in the same direction when the full implications hit

any attempt at trying for a hard brexit will tear the Tories apart again - and the recent doublespeak on NI border and chlorinated chicken etc don't bode well

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Seems like the more he stamps on the clowns in Momentum the more popular he gets and good on him. 

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On 08/06/2020 at 17:44, Van wink said:

Seems like the more he stamps on the clowns in Momentum the more popular he gets and good on him. 

image.png.3a6a77fc354b7af5697aadf9af01619a.png

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For all those who look at Starmer today and find him to their liking, please do read what made Starmer a privy councillor, a secure bit part of the establishment.

He was in charge of the DPP when it covered up the widespread infiltration by undercover police to all sorts of groups, demos and more. He is also implemented in prolonging Julian Assange's suffering. He could have stopped this farce against one of the most freely speaking journalist and publishers we ever had, but he was up to his neck in it, bending over to US pressure to continue this now very ill mans physical incarceration. Shame on him for not speaking up about it.

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What Does The ‘Defend Julian Assange’ Campaign Say About The Labour Leadership?
 
 
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HuffPost
 
POLITICS
20/02/2020 20:58 GMT | Updated 20/02/2020 21:51 GMT

What Does The ‘Defend Julian Assange’ Campaign Say About The Labour Leadership?

Corbyn and McDonnell’s approach may not be shared by their successors.

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You’re reading The Waugh Zone, our daily politics briefing. Sign up now to get it by email in the evening.

Dreyfus doofus?

John McDonnell has crafted an image over the past few years as a sweater-wearing bank manager, chuckling at and charming interviewers who suggested he was a dangerous revolutionary. While Jeremy Corbyn was Magic Grandpa, McDonnell was Uncle John.

 

But as the pair of them prepare for political retirement from the front bench (though Corbyn hinted he may stay on), it’s clear that on the issue of Julian Assange, they are both keen to champion the kind of backbench causes they have plugged away at for decades.

Today, McDonnell - who don’t forget is the shadow chancellor - decided that the most important issue for him was not the looming Budget but the fate of the Australian Wikileaks founder who is facing extradition to the US on a string of espionage and other charges over his leaks of classified material.‌

After a two-hour visit with Assange in Belmarsh prison, McDonnell emerged to make the extraordinary claim that this was “the Dreyfus case of our age, the way in which a person is being persecuted for political reasons for simply exposing the truth of what went on in relation to recent wars”.

Given Labour’s controversies over anti-Semitism, that sounded singularly tin-eared to the Jewish community and the CST charity (that provide on-street security for Jews in the UK) was quick to tweet it was “Disgraceful false equivalence to one of the key learning moments of modern Jewish history”.‌

But McDonnell is not alone among the current Labour leadership. Corbyn himself raised Assange’s case in PMQs only recently, telling Boris Johnson that “this extradition should be opposed” because Assange had exposed “war crimes, including the murder of civilians and large-scale corruption”.

Now, not everyone in the shadow cabinet is a fan of Assange and many women Labour MPs still revile his name because of the way he avoided justice in Sweden over alleged rape and assault in 2010. In fact, I vividly remember after a WaughZone Live event with Emily Thornberry last autumn one pro-Assange campaigner asking the shadow foreign secretary for support. Her response was a very firm message that she felt the priority was getting him extradited to Sweden. In fact, Thornberry has long said of the women involved “they deserve justice”.‌

But justice never came. Assange avoided extradition by seeking refuge in the Ecuadorean embassy, and last year prosecutors in Sweden dropped the case. Deputy Director of Public Prosecution Eva-Marie Persson said at the time that “I would like to emphasise that the injured party has submitted a credible and reliable version of events. Her statements have been coherent, extensive and detailed.”

Persson added “the reason for this decision is that the evidence has weakened considerably due to the long period of time that has elapsed since the events in question”. Assange’s decision to simply avoid court had paid off, but it left a nasty taste in the mouth of many.

McDonnell today said he discussed with Assange a startling claim made by his lawyer this week that Trump’s allies had offered to pardon him if he said Russia was not behind Wikileaks leaks of Hilary Clinton emails. During a visit to London in August 2017, congressman Dana Rohrabacher is said to have told Assange that “on instructions from the president he was offering a pardon or some other way out if Mr Assange...said Russia had nothing to do with the DNC [Democratic National Committee] leaks”.

A huge problem for Assange here is that there’s plenty of evidence of his close links to Vladmir Putin and the Russian regime, and that the DNC leaks were part of a Russian state-sponsored hack. One of his closest associates was also Israel Shamir, a pro-Putin anti-Semite. Your average voter may ask: is this the kind of company that McDonnell and Corbyn want to keep?

Now, of course it’s possible to oppose Assange’s extradition on grounds of press freedom and protection of whistleblowers, while at the same time loathing him for the way he avoided justice on the rape claims and for his long-standing associations with Russia. But given the way Corbyn’s own response to the Salisbury poisonings was effectively weaponised by the Tories in the last election, there are political costs for Labour in backing Assange.‌

Which brings us finally to Keir Starmer. When he was Director of Public Prosecutions, the Crown Prosecution Service fought hard for justice for Assange’s victims. When Assange claimed in 2012 that the Swedes were considering dropping the case, one email (leaked naturally) showed a CPS lawyer writing to their Swedish counterpart ‘don’t you get cold feet!’

But although Starmer has long fought hard as a lawyer for various causes, he is also a staunch believer in judicial independence. Leading politicians actually opposing an extradition is very problematic in the UK because our system is now a matter for the courts not politicians. Several Labour MPs were shocked when Corbyn actually opposed extradition in that PMQs.

https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/julian-assange-corbyn-mcdonnell_uk_5e4ee975c5b615cb7bdc9ee9

 

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Things are not likely to change much it seems

Cornwall’s taxpayers to contribute £87,600 to retail boss Sir Philip Green as he dodges business rates

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One can only wonder what the reaction would be had that money be demanded for one of Dianne Abbott's political friends.

Meanwhile the question is now coming to the fore - who is being lined up to replace Johnson

Gove will be skulking about as ever - but it will need to be someone from outside of the present bunch of incompetents

Rushi is a bit too much like the silly **** in+ It ain't half Hot mum - to and too light weight as well

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Rushi is favourite though Bill. Gove will be doing his darndest "to unite the party". He is lower than a snake's belly.

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38 minutes ago, keelansgrandad said:

Rushi is favourite though Bill. Gove will be doing his darndest "to unite the party". He is lower than a snake's belly.

As it stands, though I think you will find that Javid will still be seething.

As to Gove it is a conniving sh it of the lowest kind. And I have to wonder how much of his current actions are toward toppling Johnson and putting himself on the throne.

I would think that Johnson having served his purpose will be safe for a while.

Who would want to inherit this mess ? Far better to let Johnson carry the can, then when the full horror and lies are exposed put yourself forward as the unifying, clean broom etc candidate

But it does point to Johnson as being the (brain) dead man walking

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On 19/06/2020 at 00:49, Jools said:

21414c90-8f1a-445b-989f-74a955755b28-761

 

🙃😀

That face on your avatar, looks familiar, who is it again......?

  • Haha 1

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Lisa Nandy today talking about the importance of this country suffering from defeatism and how we shouldn't talk ourselves down, that we are an incredibly well-connected country, and we have an enormous impact on the rest of the world...

That'll be the same Lisa Nandy who talked about the UK becoming isolated and weak if we leave the EU?

Labour are pathetic.

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