Jump to content
Jools

The Positive Brexit Thread

Recommended Posts

Me and my wife bought a house 4 years ago aged 27, but we both work hard and have well-paid jobs. Too many people of our generation settle for an easy life rather than working hard or studying outside of work to get ahead.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two people with well paid jobs can afford a house shocker. There's millions of people that work hard that have no chance of getting anywhere near the housing market. I have guys I work with that put in 50+ hours a week and still have no chance. You are just taking the easy option of blaming people for being lazy and not as good fortuned as yourself.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good for you. Exactly the same was true in my generation - except that those that worked less hard could also afford to buy a house (geneally).

What I hate is one generation - usually mine - thinking the issues of the current generation are somehow their own fault. They are not - they are ours - we created this Britain  by our choices in the 70s and 80s! 

Edited by Yellow Fever
meant to quote CW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Herman said:

Two people with well paid jobs can afford a house shocker. There's millions of people that work hard that have no chance of getting anywhere near the housing market. I have guys I work with that put in 50+ hours a week and still have no chance. You are just taking the easy option of blaming people for being lazy and not as good fortuned as yourself.

 

It’s always been tough for people in low paid jobs to buy their own property, the difference now is the absence of sufficient social housing.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Yellow Fever said:

Good for you. Exactly the same was true in my generation - except that those that worked less hard could also afford to buy a house (geneally).

What I hate is one generation - usually mine - thinking the issues of the current generation are somehow their own fault. They are not - they are ours - we created this Britain  by our choices in the 70s and 80s! 

There's the difference.

CW's generation. Two well paid breadwinners can afford a house. Hard work and saving included.

My parent's generation. One averagely paid breadwinner can afford a house. Hard work and saving included.

(And speaking personally my parents, family and assorted friend's families all had 3-4 children to feed on top.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Van wink said:

It’s always been tough for people in low paid jobs to buy their own property, the difference now is the absence of sufficient social housing.

I know. People have been saying this for ages but it always just gets the "too much immigration" response and the discussion dies rather than get properly debated. As has been said before, the housing market has been completely privatised and is a disaster too be fair. It has been put in the hands of a small percentage of the country who are making a packet, while too many people are suffering the consequences.

 

Here's Moyo to prove my point. Thick and lazy.👇

Edited by Herman
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Herman said:

I know. People have been saying this for ages but it always just gets the "too much immigration" response and the discussion dies rather than get properly debated. As has been said before, the housing market has been completely privatised and is a disaster too be fair. It has been put in the hands of a small percentage of the country who are making a packet, while too many people are suffering the consequences.

Low wages and insufficient housing are both not helped by unfettered immigration.  Immigrants are willing to work for cash in hand and peanuts, while also creating excess demand for accommodation etc.  Remoaners still in denial. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Canary Wundaboy said:

Me and my wife bought a house 4 years ago aged 27, but we both work hard and have well-paid jobs. Too many people of our generation settle for an easy life rather than working hard or studying outside of work to get ahead.

Exactly. I had many part-time jobs from the age of 13 and started full-time employment at 18 and went to night school and half-day release for years to gain my professional degree.  How many are willing to do that nowadays. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Essjayess said:

You hit the nail on the head there RTB, i bought my house back in 1978 and within a year or two as we entered the 80s i can recall having to endure interest rates at a staggering 15% for quite sometime...it increased my monthly mortgage repayments hugely. The younger ones trying to get on the property ladder these days may be tied down in other areas but theyve not had to experience interest rates anywhere near that kind of level. Its really swings and roundabouts for every generation.

Another cause  nowadays is simply the population explosion, mostly  having come from immigration these past years. England is already the most crowded nation in Europe and everyone  ants a place to live, naturally. But  nearly everything associated with  extra population, be it more homes, more hospitals, more utility servicing, has not been able to keep pace.

Just take locally, at central Norwich, for decades in the 20th century it had remained  constant at around 120.000. The 2011 census had it at 132.000 and the 2021 census is expected to push it well beyond 140,000 and this picture is painted all over the country. Be it governments, politicians, authorities, but mainly society as a whole, it has been allowed to happen and as it continues with no real grasping of the nettle to deal with it, things will only become harder to deal with.

The people grasped the nettle and voted to take back control.......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Yellow Fever said:

What I hate is one generation - usually mine - thinking the issues of the current generation are somehow their own fault. They are not - they are ours - we created this Britain  by our choices in the 70s and 80s! 

This!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Herman said:

👍

Aye, it's miles behind the Netherlands, Belgium and Malta and roughly the same as Germany and Italy. Also, only less than 10% of the UK is built on, which tends to get overlooked.

According to official figures but most of us know that they are not to be trusted when there are so many illegals living in squalor in illegal multiple occupancy. Typical of the lefties to ignore the obvious.

Lies, damn lies and statistics.

Edited by paul moy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Hoola Han Solo said:

It’s because lying Brexiteer idiots like SwindoN will desperately look for arguments to support their views. It doesn’t really matter if it’s accurate or a pack of lies, as long as they’re “right” in their head. 

You have got it wrong again, just because I caught you lying, does not mean you can call me one at every opportunity. 

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, paul moy said:

Exactly. I had many part-time jobs from the age of 13 and started full-time employment at 18 and went to night school and half-day release for years to gain my professional degree.  How many are willing to do that nowadays. 

Over 150,000 UK students at the Open University.

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, TCCANARY said:

Over 150,000 UK students at the Open University.

 

There was actually a report / study a few years back that found that in general if I recall that the 'Millennials'  were actually far harder working, far more cautious with money (those student debts no doubt) than the previous generations contrary to any myth. High house prices, high rents, poor jobs.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, paul moy said:

went to night school and half-day release for years to gain my professional degree

I dread to ask what you actually qualified in? 😂

Apples

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More good weather

"UK private sector activity improved more than expected in January thanks to solid services growth ahead of the Bank of England rate decision at the end of the month. The flash IHS Markit/Cips purchasing manager index for services and manufacturing — or the composite index — rose to 52.4 in January, from 49.3 in the previous month. The figure is higher than the 50.6 forecast by economists polled by Reuters and above the 50 line separating expansion from contraction. “The survey data indicate an encouraging start to 2020 for the UK economy,” said Chris Williamson, chief business economist at IHS Markit. “Output grew at the fastest rate for 16 months amid rising demand for both manufacturing and services, suggesting business is rebounding after declines seen late last year.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, paul moy said:

According to official figures but most of us know that they are not to be trusted when there are so many illegals living in squalor in illegal multiple occupancy. Typical of the lefties to ignore the obvious.

Lies, damn lies and statistics.

When comparing statistics about population density Paul thinks that people only live illegally in the UK. Typical of the RWNJ's to ignore the thruth.

More ill-informed nonsense from Paul Moy.

Edited by TCCANARY

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Van wink said:

More good weather

"UK private sector activity improved more than expected in January thanks to solid services growth ahead of the Bank of England rate decision at the end of the month. The flash IHS Markit/Cips purchasing manager index for services and manufacturing — or the composite index — rose to 52.4 in January, from 49.3 in the previous month. The figure is higher than the 50.6 forecast by economists polled by Reuters and above the 50 line separating expansion from contraction. “The survey data indicate an encouraging start to 2020 for the UK economy,” said Chris Williamson, chief business economist at IHS Markit. “Output grew at the fastest rate for 16 months amid rising demand for both manufacturing and services, suggesting business is rebounding after declines seen late last year.”

It's the interim results of a survey that measures the sentiment of a cohort of society that are likely to be Conservative voters. It would be surprising if they weren't happier/more optimistic. Much better to wait for some actual economic metrics before reading too much into it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SwindonCanary said:

You have got it wrong again, just because I caught you lying, does not mean you can call me one at every opportunity. 

You’ve never caught me out lying. 
 

Nice distraction though from the fact you posted up more ill informed guff. 
 

If you post up nonsense and lies from the internet that makes you a LIAR.

You really don’t have a clue about anything do you Swindo?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, paul moy said:

Exactly. I had many part-time jobs from the age of 13 and started full-time employment at 18 and went to night school and half-day release for years to gain my professional degree.  How many are willing to do that nowadays. 

I didn’t know you needed a professional degree to work at McDonalds? 🤔

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, BigFish said:

It's the interim results of a survey that measures the sentiment of a cohort of society that are likely to be Conservative voters. It would be surprising if they weren't happier/more optimistic. Much better to wait for some actual economic metrics before reading too much into it.

PMI data are compiled from survey questions tracking actual changes in business volumes such as output, not sentiment-based questions.....apparantly

Edited by Van wink
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Van wink said:

PMI data are compiled from survey questions tracking actual changes in business volumes such as output, not sentiment-based questions.

Not how the FT describes it in the penultimate paragraph of the piece you quoted.

image.thumb.png.b3e91cb47dae4b416a8d898d814eaf04.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be amazed if it didn't improve - at least temporarily after the election. Some uncertainty has at least been removed.

Manufacturing even on 'sentiment'still below 50. Hmm.

Ho hum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Hoola Han Solo said:

You’ve never caught me out lying. 
 

Nice distraction though from the fact you posted up more ill informed guff. 
 

If you post up nonsense and lies from the internet that makes you a LIAR.

You really don’t have a clue about anything do you Swindon?

Ho, dear, deeper and deeper, you are lying again

Edited by SwindonCanary
people who can't spell swindon
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, SwindonCanary said:

Ho, dear, deeper and deeper, you are lying again

No Swindo. Is your constant lying a medical condition? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Van wink said:

PMITM by IHS Markit

https://ihsmarkit.com/products/pmi.html

 

My quote is from the organisation that compiles the data

Well they would say that, wouldn't they. Looks like sentiment to everyone else.

Howard Archer, warned: "It must be considered that the purchasing managers' surveys can tend to overstate developments at times of significant changing political circumstances, so the flash survey could possibly exaggerate the rebound in January after overplaying some of the earlier weakness."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just for fun its sometimes interesting to look further afield for a perspective (I know that's difficult for many).

The latest PMI surveys for the Eurozone show that manufacturing and services output growth remained stable and at a modest pace in January, with IHS Markit's Eurozone Composite Flash Purchasing Managers' Index (PMI) remaining unchanged at 50.9.

IHS Markit said that France and Germany's economies were both seeing a recovery with combined output growth at a five-month high, but in other countries growth of business activity slowing to near-stagnation.

However business confidence across the single-currency area jumped to a 16-month high.

“Overall, a stable picture for both growth and inflation will likely reassure the European Central Bank that they are safe to keep monetary policy fixed for now while carrying out a strategy review," said IHS Markit's associate director Andrew Harker.

Edited by Yellow Fever
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...