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The Positive Brexit Thread

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2 hours ago, SwindonCanary said:

How old are you ? I'm guessing it's about 9 or 10

YOU ALWAYS SEEM TO DISAPPEAR WHEN I ASK, I WONDER WHY 😉

I disappear because I happen to have a life outside this tuppenny ha'penny forum you FVCKWIT, SWINDO.

That ok Peter the deleter.

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1 minute ago, SwindonCanary said:

SO HOW OLD ARE YOU ?

None of you fvcking business FVCKWIT.

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2 minutes ago, SHRIMPER said:

None of you fvcking business FVCKWIT.

i'M NOW CONVINCED YOU ARE A YOUNGSTER ! LITTLE BOY WHO KNOWS NO BETTER !

Edited by SwindonCanary
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40 minutes ago, SwindonCanary said:

THAT'S WHAT THEY ARE SAYING, WHY WOULD THEY NOT TELL THE TRUTH ?

Swindo, so are you telling me that Brexit has had zero effect on any UK business?

Edited by Hoola Han Solo
Spelt Swindo wrong

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17 hours ago, Herman said:

She's still at it.🤣🤣

 

Is June Mummery Swindo in drag? 🤔😂

Apples

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25 minutes ago, Hoola Han Solo said:

Swindo, so are you telling me that Brexit has had zero effect on any UK business?

The biggest undoubtable effect of brexit is to make EVERY company that has European links (import or export) question why it is based in the UK and does that continue to make sense after Brexit. If you have to rationalize or downsize do you preferentially do that in Europe or the UK (all those car plants....)

I doubt very many European companies or those even further afield can as yet see any good reason to move to the UK after Brexit - possibly tax avoidance I suppose!

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https://unherd.com/2020/01/both-brexiteers-and-remainers-know-nothing-about-europe/?tl_inbound=1&tl_groups[0]=18743&tl_period_type=3

"There are two continental Europes: the fictional one of the British liberal imagination, and the reality; both are indeed lovely places, but they are rather different to each other; and despite globalisation, the internet and all that business, the continent still remains very much isolated."

 

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1 hour ago, TCCANARY said:

He could do both the lead roles in a remake of 'Dumb & Dumber'.

 

I've got a mental picture of Swindon waving in a mirror and wondering why the other guy looks like him   :classic_tongue:

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9 minutes ago, Icecream Snow said:

I've got a mental picture of Swindon waving in a mirror and wondering why the other guy looks like him   :classic_tongue:

Arh the 'Mirror test' - MSR. IQ of 125 compared to a fish..... 

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1 hour ago, Hoola Han Solo said:

Does anyone know if the fish voted Leave or Remain?

Definitely voted to leave the net :classic_tongue:

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34 minutes ago, ron obvious said:

https://unherd.com/2020/01/both-brexiteers-and-remainers-know-nothing-about-europe/?tl_inbound=1&tl_groups[0]=18743&tl_period_type=3

"There are two continental Europes: the fictional one of the British liberal imagination, and the reality; both are indeed lovely places, but they are rather different to each other; and despite globalisation, the internet and all that business, the continent still remains very much isolated."

 

I just took this one supposed fact:

Free movement

Despite all the despair about Brexit taking away our freedom to live, love and travel the world, not many Brits choose to live in continental Europe. Most who do are retirees in Spain, who aren’t taking the opportunity to explore the world but just want less winter in their autumn years.

Most expat Brits do not live in Spain, and many of those who do are not retirees. The clear majority of expats in the EU live in France, Germany, Eire, Italy the Netherlands etc. And most of them work. Which is the point of freedom of movement, and not as this idiot seems to think a way of pursuing some lotus-eating lifestyle. Hence the problem with its poetial loss.

These workers have been able to move from one EU country to another as the work takes them. But when the UK leaves, although these people will probably be able to stay in whichever country they are in at the moment, they will almost certainly lose the right to keep on moving where the work is.

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4 hours ago, Van wink said:

More good economic news for us to celebrate today, nice to see the FT reporting it positively 😉



"UK manufacturers have become much more optimistic about the outlook for business since October, according to a survey published on Wednesday that could be an early sign of a post-election rebound in economic growth. The turnround in sentiment was the biggest on record in the CBI’s quarterly industrial trends survey, which has been published since 1958. The share of manufacturers expecting business to improve is 23 per cent larger than the share expecting conditions to worsen — the highest since 2014; whereas in October, doom-mongers outnumbered optimists by 44 per cent."

 

How does this fit with your economic analysis BF?

@Van wink, it is the difference between the weather and climate change. It was cold this morning, that doesn't mean climate change isn't happening. On the employment figures you posted earlier, they have become strangly disconnected from the general health of the economy, as have interest rates and inflation. Perhaps it is because a large segment of workers endure insecure jobs, uncertain hours and inwork poverty.

The UK economy suffers from low investment, low productivity, low wages and low skills. Without addressing this, and neither of your two recent posts do, the UK is in real trouble. Rationally some of this is out of the governments control and not all of it is related to Brexit. That said any policy will need to take Brexit into account as well the global situation. To date there has been nothing coherent from the government.

Between 1945 and 2007 average growth in UK GDP was between 2.7% and 2.8%. Since then in only one year has UK growth exceeded 2.5%. Indeed economists now calculate that efficiency in the economy has shrunk to a degree where the maximum possible growth is 1.5% if an outbreak of inflation is to be avoided. Last year UK growth was less than 1% and it is unlikely to rise much, if at all, in 2020.

Unless produtivity rises in a transformed economy demographics, Brexit and the plan to reduce immigration is likely to weigh heavy on the UK economy. The graph below illustrates the issue, as far as I have seen the government has no idea how to mediate this.

image.thumb.png.5d83a69e20435c2178cadcad9469567e.png

 

 

 

image.png

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Clinate 

10 minutes ago, BigFish said:

@Van wink, it is the difference between the weather and climate change. It was cold this morning, that doesn't mean climate change isn't happening. On the employment figures you posted earlier, they have become strangly disconnected from the general health of the economy, as have interest rates and inflation. Perhaps it is because a large segment of workers endure insecure jobs, uncertain hours and inwork poverty.

The UK economy suffers from low investment, low productivity, low wages and low skills. Without addressing this, and neither of your two recent posts do, the UK is in real trouble. Rationally some of this is out of the governments control and not all of it is related to Brexit. That said any policy will need to take Brexit into account as well the global situation. To date there has been nothing coherent from the government.

Between 1945 and 2007 average growth in UK GDP was between 2.7% and 2.8%. Since then in only one year has UK growth exceeded 2.5%. Indeed economists now calculate that efficiency in the economy has shrunk to a degree where the maximum possible growth is 1.5% if an outbreak of inflation is to be avoided. Last year UK growth was less than 1% and it is unlikely to rise much, if at all, in 2020.

Unless produtivity rises in a transformed economy demographics, Brexit and the plan to reduce immigration is likely to weigh heavy on the UK economy. The graph below illustrates the issue, as far as I have seen the government has no idea how to mediate this.

image.thumb.png.5d83a69e20435c2178cadcad9469567e.png

 

 

 

image.png

 

Climate change and the deniers is a good analogy.

I  would summarise it as the difference between facts and wishful thinking.

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1 hour ago, ron obvious said:

https://unherd.com/2020/01/both-brexiteers-and-remainers-know-nothing-about-europe/?tl_inbound=1&tl_groups[0]=18743&tl_period_type=3

"There are two continental Europes: the fictional one of the British liberal imagination, and the reality; both are indeed lovely places, but they are rather different to each other; and despite globalisation, the internet and all that business, the continent still remains very much isolated."

 

Interesting read RO but as usual all it shows is the contradictions inherent in the Brexit position.

The EU doesn't come over here as some all powerful super-state - more we have an assemblage of very different unruly states all with varying cultural and economic issues. However they generally agree that they'd better hang together or they will surely hang separately! All the EU does is try to agree some common ground and rules between themselves!

As to Brexit - are we 'Global Britain' - free-trade, no tariffs, immigration, hire-'em fire-'em, winner takes all or are we 'Protectionist' UK - no or little immigration, high tariffs to defend our industry and agriculture and inward looking. Yes a conundrum as most Brexiters seem to be of the later!

Edited by Yellow Fever

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The CBI’s rolling survey of British business confidence in the UK has seen optimism in British factories hit its highest level since 2014; leaping from -44 in October to +23 in January. Prizes for guessing what event in between may have triggered the leap…

Screenshot-2020-01-22-at-15.47.39.png?re

 

The leap – coming only a week before Britain finally Brexits – is confirmation that growth is settling into top gear since the pre-Election uncertainty was ended, and once again undermines the arguments of remainers with the biggest quarterly swing since records began in 1958. The Boris bounce in action proving the gloomsters and doomsters wrong… 👍 😎

January 22nd 2020 @ 3:53 pm

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Brexit Britain Banking Bonanza: EU banks flood in, IMF puts UK ahead of Eurozone

Osborne and Hammond remain silent, as their Remainer 'fear forecasts' turn to dust

 

hammond_lagarde_osborne.jpg

Hammond, Lagarde, Osborne - All their forecasts were wrong

Brexit Facts4EU.Org summarises two stunning economic reports issued yesterday

In a spectacular double-whammy yesterday, two reports were released which put paid to the last vestiges of pre- and post-Brexit Project Fear.

Brexit Facts4EU.Org Summary

Brexit Britain - More good economic news

 

  • London’s status as financial capital of Europe looks secure: Over 1,000 EU firms plan to open UK offices
  • PLUS - IMF latest forecast shows UK growing faster than Eurozone and even Germany
  • “We gravely misled the British Public,” said former Chancellors Osborne and Hammond, in our dreams

1. Over 1,000 EU Banks and financial services businesses plan to open UK offices

financial_firms_applying_210120.jpg

Following a freedom of Information request to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) by financial consultancy Bovill, it was revealed yesterday that some 1,400 EU-based firms have applied for permission to operate in the UK after Brexit, with over 1,000 of these planning to establish their first UK office.

Amongst the total of 1441 applications are those from 134 EU/EEA banks, which will either be setting up offices in London for the first time or boosting their current UK presence. Financial firms planning to move to the UK span all sectors in financial services. As well as EU banks, these include EU asset managers, insurers, exchanges and fintech firms.

2. IMF finally puts UK ahead of Eurozone and Germany, in latest economic forecasts

Yesterday the pro-EU International Monetary Fund (IMF) released the latest update to its economic forecasts for growth in the world’s economies. It did so just ahead of the start of the 4-day meeting of world leaders and financial corporations at Davos in Switzerland which starts today.

These figures clearly show that the IMF expects Brexit Britain to outperform the economies of the Eurozone and Germany, even during the undoubted turbulence following the UK’s final departure from the EU.

imf_gdp_forecasts_200120.jpg

Observations

We are delighted to bring readers summaries of two more official reports which provide yet more positive facts about Brexit.

The first report uses data provided by the Financial Conduct Authority and the second is from the International Monetary Fund. Remainers were delighted to use information from such organisations when they promoted Project Fear. We are sure that these Remainers must now be delighted to have been proved so wrong by the subsequent and positive facts, figures, and events. Perhaps they might even apologise to the public... or perhaps not.

The IMF was one of those organisations which was happy to play its part in Project Fear prior to the EU Referendum in 2016, urged on by then Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne and the rest of the Cameron Government. This continued after the Referendum under the Theresa May Government and her new Chancellor Philip Hammond, as the Establishment attempted to overturn the largest democratic result in British history.

Until late last year the IMF was led by the arch-europhile Frenchwoman Christine Lagarde. In November Ms Lagarde was appointed President of the European Central Bank. This is despite having been found guilty of negligence by a French court in a massive national financial scandal in 2016.

Yesterday the organisation she led for eight years - the IMF - was forced to revise its figures again, although of course it never expressed this as eating humble pie. Instead, we simply have their plain forecast figures which we are happy to bring you.

The IMF says that the UK will outperform the Eurozone for the three years from 2019. Who would have thunk it?

 

[ Sources: Financial Conduct Authority / Bovills Ltd | International Monetary Fund ] Politicians and journalists can contact us for details, as ever.

Brexit Facts4EU.Org, 22 Jan 2020

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20 minutes ago, Jools said:

 growth is settling into top gear since the pre-Election uncertainty was ended

A complete, total, 100% lie

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17 minutes ago, BigFish said:

A complete, total, 100% lie

I think he means just December......

But yes by any meaningful, intelligent understanding in plain English it's complete BS!

Exactly what you'd expect from any two- a- penny snake oil salesman though.

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1 hour ago, PurpleCanary said:

I just took this one supposed fact:

Free movement

Despite all the despair about Brexit taking away our freedom to live, love and travel the world, not many Brits choose to live in continental Europe. Most who do are retirees in Spain, who aren’t taking the opportunity to explore the world but just want less winter in their autumn years.

Most expat Brits do not live in Spain, and many of those who do are not retirees. The clear majority of expats in the EU live in France, Germany, Eire, Italy the Netherlands etc. And most of them work. Which is the point of freedom of movement, and not as this idiot seems to think a way of pursuing some lotus-eating lifestyle. Hence the problem with its poetial loss.

These workers have been able to move from one EU country to another as the work takes them. But when the UK leaves, although these people will probably be able to stay in whichever country they are in at the moment, they will almost certainly lose the right to keep on moving where the work is.

https://fullfact.org/europe/how-many-uk-citizens-live-other-eu-countries/

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20 minutes ago, ron obvious said:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-46632854

The puzzle of how many Brits abroad there really are

It seems that the fullfact data is about people living abroad for over 12 months and other data about people who work in the EU could be much higher but it's not officially recorded due to FOM.

 

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8 minutes ago, BigFish said:

A complete, total, 100% lie

Nay -- WW3, the five million unemployed, businesses going bust left right and centre, scarcity of food/medicines/water and interest rates skyrocketing upon Brexit you Remainiacs told us was going to happen --- Those are lies 🤥

The way things are panning out it goes pretty much all the way to prove that Brexit uncertainty was the cause of many perceived business ills over the past three and a half years and that the uncertainty is totally and unequivocally down to Remainiacs.

 

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6 minutes ago, PurpleCanary said:

Yes, as I said, the majority of UK expats do not live in Spain. Most live in other EU countries.

OK. More expats live in Spain than any other EU country.

 

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24 minutes ago, ron obvious said:

OK. More expats live in Spain than any other EU country.

 

Yes, and if he had said that I wouldn't have pedantically butted in. But the real point, leaving aside his illiteracy/innumeracy, was that he didn't have a clue about why the loss of freedom of movement is potentially so serious for the hundreds of thousands of working expats and their families. Instead he repeated the fallacious cliché of retirees on this or that Costa. And that is without getting on to the other objections I have to the piece. Luckily we now have a game to follow.

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