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The Positive Brexit Thread

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24 minutes ago, SwindonCanary said:

I just hope you get the meaning !

Yes, we all get it. You're stupid and everything you post is stupid.

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3 hours ago, Herman said:

Has Rock The Bot seen what is happening in Australia? 

So you are saying this is end of the world?

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It could be the beginning of the end or the wake up call for action. 

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34 minutes ago, A Load of Squit said:

Yes, we all get it. You're stupid and everything you post is stupid.

name calling because you can't win the argument 😉

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1 hour ago, SwindonCanary said:

And criminals can move freely !

Great. A simple soundbite with zero evidence is a great way run this country. 

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10 minutes ago, SwindonCanary said:

name calling because you can't win the argument 😉

No, in the last week you've posted an incorrect map and declared that we were leaving the EU on 31/12/19.

That's stupid and only a stupid person would do that.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, SwindonCanary said:

I just hope you get the meaning !

I got the meaning, I just don´t understand why people like Dispropaganda try to make a point then fúck it up by getting it wrong

Also, Turkey seems to be missing from the 2020 map ...… 😉

Edited by How I Wrote Elastic Man
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16 hours ago, kick it off said:

Oh Ok, that's great then. I'll let the MILLION more children from working households who live in poverty know that everything is fantastic then. The stagnant wage growth that's been miles below inflation for much of the decade and the cuts to in work benefits is clearly cancelled out by that.

https://www.tuc.org.uk/news/child-poverty-working-households-1-million-children-2010-says-tuc

None of our kids are in true poverty.   Go to third world countries and you will really see TRUE poverty and that is an argument for Brexit and removing tariffs on imported goods that the parasitic EU apply.

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Civil servants could be forced to sit regular exams to prove they are competent to work in Whitehall under “seismic” changes being planned by Downing Street, the architect of Boris Johnson's manifesto has said.

Rachel Wolf, the co-author of the Conservative Party's election blueprint, says officials are “woefully unprepared” for wholesale reforms being planned by the Prime Minister to transform the way the Government is run.

Writing in The Daily Telegraph, she says widely-reported plans for merging, creating or abolishing departments represent a “tiny fraction” of the revolution that Mr Johnson and his chief aide Dominic Cummings will implement in the spring once Britain has left the EU.

Ms Wolf says they will end the “merry-go-round” of officials changing jobs every 18 months, which currently prevents them building up expertise and allows them to escape the consequences of their mistakes.

Reform is long overdue. This is going to be interesting!

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, Van wink said:

Civil servants could be forced to sit regular exams to prove they are competent to work in Whitehall under “seismic” changes being planned by Downing Street, the architect of Boris Johnson's manifesto has said.

Rachel Wolf, the co-author of the Conservative Party's election blueprint, says officials are “woefully unprepared” for wholesale reforms being planned by the Prime Minister to transform the way the Government is run.

Writing in The Daily Telegraph, she says widely-reported plans for merging, creating or abolishing departments represent a “tiny fraction” of the revolution that Mr Johnson and his chief aide Dominic Cummings will implement in the spring once Britain has left the EU.

Ms Wolf says they will end the “merry-go-round” of officials changing jobs every 18 months, which currently prevents them building up expertise and allows them to escape the consequences of their mistakes.

Reform is long overdue. This is going to be interesting!

 

YES - And has absolutely nothing to do with being in or out of the EU. :classic_biggrin:

 

Edited by Yellow Fever

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, Yellow Fever said:

 

YES - And has absolutely nothing to do with being in or out of the EU. :classic_biggrin:

 

:classic_biggrin: Well you got that right. Keep it up 😉

Edited by Van wink

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, Van wink said:

:classic_biggrin: Well you got that right. keep it up 😉

There is a far more serious point though to the civil service.

All the EU functions that where cost effectively split across 28 countries (with efficiencies of scale) we are now going to have to duplicate / replace in whole, in the UK - yes recreate in London (or please elsewhere) at much the same expense as all the Brussels offices and employees but just for us now the same functions (from trade to standards etc).

Given that we know that the civil service is hugely inefficient (and I recall its acknowledged the EU was efficient by comparison) we really do have to get the CS sorted to avoid a huge splurge and surge in costs and expenses.

Nevertheless still a few billion required for all those extra red tape generators.

Edited by Yellow Fever
Another foot shot.....

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6 hours ago, A Load of Squit said:

When did she say the world will end in 15 years?

 


Our house is on fire, I am here to say our house is on fire. According to the IPCC we are less than 12 years away from not being able to undo our mistakes.

In that time unprecedented changes in all aspects of society needs to have taken place including a reduction of our co2 emissions by at least 50% and please note that those numbers do not include the aspect of equity which is absolutely necessary to make the Paris agreement work on a global scale. Nor does it include tipping points or feedback loops like the extreme powerful methane gas being released from the thawing Arctic permafrost.

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5 hours ago, Herman said:

....this as well. Maybe Vietnam can assist the Australian boat people!!

 

The bush fires have been made worse by Green policy of not allowing homeowners and farmers to clear areas of land around their properties due to effect on flora and flora. Without having natural fire breaks not only have fires been allowed to spread faster but also provides extra fuel. 

IMG_20200102_144133.jpg

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31 minutes ago, Yellow Fever said:

There is a far more serious point though to the civil service.

All the EU functions that where cost effectively split across 28 countries (with efficiencies of scale) we are now going to have to duplicate / replace in whole, in the UK - yes recreate in London (or please elsewhere) at much the same expense as all the Brussels offices and employees but just for us now the same functions (from trade to standards etc).

Given that we know that the civil service is hugely inefficient (and I recall its acknowledged the EU was efficient by comparison) we really do have to get the CS sorted to avoid a huge splurge and surge in costs and expenses.

Nevertheless still a few billion required for all those extra red tape generators.

 

There is also a political, democratic and bureaucratic cost burden associated with EU membership which will be saved. 

The serious point here is not about Brexit, its about a Civil Service that needs reform, decentralisation and to be dragged into the modern era. Many have tried and failed, I suspect this government will actually be able to pull it off.

 

 

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Yes, I was hearing that argument way back in 1993, while I was surrounded by large bush fires in Sydney. Back burning could have prevented some of the fires back then, but it would have had to have been on an epic scale to stop what is going on now.

What's the difference to then and now? Back then we were getting highs in the late 30s. Now the heat is regularly in the 40s, for longer peiods of time. There were always droughts on some scale, but the current ones have lasted for a long time. So what has changed?

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6 minutes ago, Van wink said:

 

There is also a political, democratic and bureaucratic cost burden associated with EU membership which will be saved. 

The serious point here is not about Brexit, its about a Civil Service that needs reform, decentralisation and to be dragged into the modern era. Many have tried and failed, I suspect this government will actually be able to pull it off.

 

 

Yes - apart from the non-existent bureaucratic cost saving you get somethings right :classic_biggrin:

 Keep it up!

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56 minutes ago, Rock The Boat said:


Our house is on fire, I am here to say our house is on fire. According to the IPCC we are less than 12 years away from not being able to undo our mistakes.

In that time unprecedented changes in all aspects of society needs to have taken place including a reduction of our co2 emissions by at least 50% and please note that those numbers do not include the aspect of equity which is absolutely necessary to make the Paris agreement work on a global scale. Nor does it include tipping points or feedback loops like the extreme powerful methane gas being released from the thawing Arctic permafrost.

So she didn't say the world will end in 15 years, you just made that up.

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Yellow Fever said:

Yes - apart from the non-existent bureaucratic cost saving you get somethings right :classic_biggrin:

 Keep it up!

Democracy and the bureaucratic process that comes with it has a cost YF, did you think it came free?

Edited by Van wink

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19 hours ago, Van wink said:

6.2 % it’s a good rise 😉


The increase in the minimum wage since 2016 has already resulted in a sharp decline in the share of low-paid jobs, defined as those below two-thirds of median hourly earnings according to data from the Office for National Statistics published in October. On an hourly earnings basis, the proportion of low-paid employee jobs fell to 16.2 per cent in 2019, the lowest since the series began in 1997.

 

17 hours ago, paul moy said:

Low earners are paying the lowest tax for a decade. In 2009 the threshold was 6400 pounds, and now it stands at 12500 pounds, so what you are saying is nonsense as they can earn an extra 6,100 before tax, giving them around 1200 pounds extra annually.

 

17 hours ago, Van wink said:

A very effective way of helping those on low incomes. Wage growth above inflation now and has been for a while I believe, moves in the right direction I’m sure we can all agree👍

Good that we are debating the fundamentals of the economy, not so good it is done with such a lack of basic understanding. Firstly, there is a difference between an actual living wage and what the government calls the "living wage". The real living wage is £10.75 in London (£9.35 elsewhere), and across the country only applies to those over 24. If Johnson was serious he would apply the Living Wage at 18 and at a level that actually pays the living wage, not the laughable £8.20 for the under 25s and £8.72 otherwise.

Secondly @Van wink uses comparative metrics to argue that the numbers of low paid workers have fallen, rather than the absolute measures that demonstrate in-work poverty is rising along with the number of low wage jobs. Up from 13% to 18% according to the IFS over the last twenty five years.

Lastly @paul moy repeats the fallacy that increasing the income tax threshold specifically helps the low paid and to the tune of £1200. In fact many of the poor will not benefit because their earnings are less than the threshold already or that the corresponding reductions in in-work benefits increases their marginal tax rate. In fact it is higher rate taxpayers who benefit most by raising thresholds, which are very expensive measures for the Treasury.

What we can learn from this is Johnson will keep pumping out "good news stories" for the gullible to suck up and regurgitate (some on here). Johnson has a track record on this, what he doesn't have is a track record of successful delivery or intellectual thinking. By all means praise him on any benefits resulting from his actions but don't waste our time repeating what he says he is going to do because that will lead to widespread disappointment.

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2 hours ago, Yellow Fever said:

 

YES - And has absolutely nothing to do with being in or out of the EU. :classic_biggrin:

 

Except that most were remoaners scared of joining the big wide world, surrounded by the EU comfort blanket covering up their incompetence. The gravy train will now end.

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1 hour ago, Herman said:

Yes, I was hearing that argument way back in 1993, while I was surrounded by large bush fires in Sydney. Back burning could have prevented some of the fires back then, but it would have had to have been on an epic scale to stop what is going on now.

What's the difference to then and now? Back then we were getting highs in the late 30s. Now the heat is regularly in the 40s, for longer peiods of time. There were always droughts on some scale, but the current ones have lasted for a long time. So what has changed?

As I mentioned previously, ignorance has meant that aquifers have been depleted over decades by wells and bore holes causing high usage of water with insufficient replenishment in many countries, and land consequently is drying out. Drier land due to this, coupled with high temperatures will mean more bush fires etc.

 

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One day Mad Moyo will realise that our membership of the EU wasn't causing the country's problems. It'll be far too late though.

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2 hours ago, Herman said:

The Telegraph did try to warn you to be fair.😐

 

Manufacturing is down right across the eurozone and Germany is leading the industrial recession, followed by Austria, Italy and Spain.

Good time to be getting out 👍

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Tories Prepare For Court and Boundary Reform 👍

 

Supreme-court-post-election-reform.png?w

Following Guido being the first to reveal the Tories’ manifesto Supreme Court reform plans, while the manifesto ended up being as vague as expected (merely proposing a need to “look at the broader aspects of our constitution: the relationship between the Government, Parliament and the courts”), Guido can now reveal one specific being discussed is seeing a pivot in the remit of the Supreme Court. The change would turn the court away from focussing on “cases of the greatest public and constitutional importance” and instead returning to the Law Lords’ original remit of the 80s and 90s, of the most complex cases adjudicating tax and commercial cases. It’s dry but important, stick with us…

The Tories’ victory in West Bromwich West is appropriately symbolic of their plans to deal with the courts. The 1948 Wednesbury Principle – named after a town in the constituency – created the ‘Wednesbury unreasonableness’ test, whereby the courts can only intervene to correct a move if it was:

“So outrageous in its defiance of logic or accepted moral standards that no sensible person who had applied his mind to the question to be decided could have arrived at it.”

Senior Tories believe courts’ judicial reviews “have strayed so far from what was originally intended”, and if the Wednesbury Principle applied at the time, it would have resulted in Boris’s prorogation being deemed lawful.

In other constitutional rumours, Guido hears the Government is erring towards pushing boundary reforms through Parliament without reducing the number of constituencies to 600, in order to avoid Tory MP rebellions. One senior Tory semi-jokingly claims the reduction is now not needed as MPs take on additional casework that used to be handled by MEPs…

Interestingly, findings now seem to show following the realignment of the parties in the General Election, the boundary review now benefits the Tories far less than it would have in 2015 or 2017. The Minister responsible for the review – when at one post-election event hosted by the Mayite ‘Onwards’ Think Tank – ended up having to ask them for their analysis on which parties would now stand to benefit…

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2 hours ago, paul moy said:

Except that most were remoaners scared of joining the big wide world, surrounded by the EU comfort blanket covering up their incompetence. The gravy train will now end.

The funny thing is now Paul we will actually need a lot more civil servants to undertake all the functions that the EU used to do for us.

If it was a gravy train it will not only continue but looks like getting a lot bigger. Jobs for the 'elite' boys and girls. 

Yes it needs shaking up but you can't wish away that there will ba lot more for them to do. Isn't that what you voted for?

 

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3 hours ago, A Load of Squit said:

So she didn't say the world will end in 15 years, you just made that up.

 

So you obviously missed all the media attention that her speech created.

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6 minutes ago, Yellow Fever said:

The funny thing is now Paul we will actually need a lot more civil servants to undertake all the functions that the EU used to do for us.

If it was a gravy train it will not only continue but looks like getting a lot bigger. Jobs for the 'elite' boys and girls. 

Yes it needs shaking up but you can't wish away that there will ba lot more for them to do. Isn't that what you voted for?

 

What exactly did the EU do that we didn't do, in respect of these civil servants?

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