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The Brexit Thread

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Just now, Herman said:

The Scottish, Northern Irish and Welsh assemblies all vote to withold consent to the Withdrawal bil. I guess in our new democracy they will all be ignored.

Absolutely. And rightly so 😎

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Trump at Davos: ‘We Look Forward to Negotiating a Tremendous New Deal With the United Kingdom’

President Donald Trump has talked up the prospect of a “tremendous” trade deal with the United Kingdom during his keynote speech at the World Economic Forum meeting at Davos, Switzerland.

Speaking to political and business leaders in a wide-ranging speech that took several victory laps over the performance of the U.S. economy under his leadership, President Trump also hailed a new era of trade deals which emphasised “reciprocity” — fairness for both parties — namechecking new deals with Japan and others, as well as others to come.

The President particularly pointed to the United Kingdom as a future partner for trade, hailing “wonderful” Prime Minister Boris Johnson, himself fresh from winning a landslide election victory over the increasingly hard-left Labour party last month, and expressing his anticipation at signing a deal. He said:

The United States has also concluded a great new trade deal with Japan, approximately $40 billion. And completely negotiated our deal with South Korea. We’re also negotiating many other transactions with many other countries.

We look forward to negotiating a tremendous new deal with the United Kingdom. They have a wonderful new Prime Minister, he wants very much to make a deal, as they say.

 

This is not by far the first time President Trump has praised Boris Johnson. Immediately following the election, the President wrote “Congratulations to Boris Johnson on his great WIN!”, and said the two nations would be free to sign a “massive”, “bigger and more lucrative” trade deal than would have been possible with the European Union

The United Kingdom signing a trade deal — or even just making obvious progress to concluding it — is looking likely to be a crucial part of Britain leaving the European Union over the course of 2020. Not only would it enhance economic activity with the world’s largest economy for trading nation Britain, but the success of the country outside the European Union will offer crucial leverage to UK negotiators in Brussels.

The European Union has — as it has through every stage of the Brexit process so far — acted with intransigence over the prospect of a trade deal so far, but Britain signing a strong mutual deal with the United States quickly would place enormous pressure on Eurocrats from European national leaders to act sensibly.

As Breitbart London reported at the weekend of Boris Johnson’s plans to make the deal work:

Mr Johnson has approved ministers’ plans to go “hell for leather” for a rapid U.S. free trade agreement… There are reportedly 70 civil servants in Whitehall prepared to work on an American trade deal, while there are smaller teams of 20 to 40 working on trade deals with Australia, New Zealand, and Japan.

A source told a British newspaper: “If we can do a deal on beef with the US, that is beef we don’t need to buy from Ireland, which means we have some leverage with the EU.”

The Prime Minister has even threatened to walk away from negotiations if the EU isn’t willing to concede ground.

President Trump’s comments follow those by others including ambassador to London Woody Johnson and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who is 2019 said America will “be ready on the doorstep, pen in hand”, to sign a trade deal with the UK post-Brexit.

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👍

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28 minutes ago, Herman said:

Good stuff.

 

Sorry, Hermione, an 80 strong stonking majority means that can also be easily overturned...

Wanna try something else? 😀

Edited by Jools

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1 hour ago, Creative Midfielder said:

But he isn't really is he, that's just one among many technology examples.

It doesn't really matter whether you're talking about hardware, software, cloud based services or a combination of - there is a big step (a huge leap actually!) between a clever\innovative design and early development of something, and turning it into a commercial product, successfully marketing and selling it - that is where the real money is and UK companies have proven to be very good at the first stage, and extremely poor at the rest.

IMO there are two reasons for this. Firstly whilst we do seem to have more than our fair share of genuinely inventive and creative people they are not necessarily, or even usually, people who also have the skills (or the finance) to commercialise their ideas.

Secondly the UK business environment is really not helpful to small but innovative businesses - UK investors and big business mostly take ridiculously a short term view in financing projects\developments, and like it or not out there in the big wide world there are much wealthier players who watch the industry carefully, especially places like Cambridge (you are right about the quality there), and will happily take a punt on buying up promising small companies before they really take off. Add in that the Government provides minimal encouragement to small firms and happily encourages overseas investment (for that read 'overseas purchase of IPR') and it's no surprise that the UK is providing a lot of the brains but reaping very little of the rewards.

It would be great if we could change things around but I see no sign at all that we can. In fact whether we are talking manufacturing or services the trend appears to be very much one where the market leaders are tightening their grip on their markets and using their huge financial muscle to keep things that way by buying up potential competition.

Yes I agree with much of what you write and we really do need to change the climate so that creative ideas are formed into substantive products and services and this is rightly an area where we have been lagging. 

I also think that is about to change after Brexit because we can now act in an agile fashion and we have people at the centre of government who understand this stuff. 

The next five to ten years could be amazing if we focus on change and adaptability. Cummings famous job advert suggests he gets it. 

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On 20/01/2020 at 14:15, Yellow Fever said:

VW - I don't agree with this .. A so called Hard Brexit is by choice not by necessity.

Yes I did want a confirmatory referendum - I don't sign blank cheques or contracts without knowing the terms. It seems many do so - more fool them.

As to the future - yes we'll make the best of it - we have our plans which will be now be actioned without further input from the electorate but wholly dependent upon which way Johnson goes. Brexit has taken far too much management time already. I can retire.

As I noted to SC - Honda no longer have a Brexit problem and the board sleep more soundly because of it!

 

"It is also worth reflecting that the harsh Brexit that now lies ahead is the result of monumental political misjudgments — by Theresa May, the former prime minister, the Labour Party, the Liberal Democrats, Tory rebels and the second referendum campaign. The European Council, too, is partly to blame. EU leaders could have helped secured a softer Brexit if they had refused to participate in the charade of Brexit extensions"

 

The point here is that Parliament had, I think it was, 3 chances to vote through Mays WA and they voted it down. Yes that was in part due to the ERG but there was a majority in the House who I believe were prepared to accept the democratic decision of the referendum but who were playing political games, had Labour not whipped against the deal we would have had a softer landing, not a soft Brexit but one a lot softer then the one we are now likely to achieve. We even had the Nandy amendment which wasn't even selected by the Speaker but which would have given parliament a vote on the future negotiating mandate for the government.....all thrown away.  

 

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Yes VW. But the Government that can decide the Brexit we get is the Government we have now. The voters of this country have not been consulted on that. So what we get is this Government's decision, and will be their legacy. The Loyal Opposition can make every effort to hold their feet to the fire to make the best arrangements and so should the British public. And the media should report that honestly and fairly (not that I'm expecting the British media to do any such thing) 

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30 minutes ago, Rock The Boat said:

II also think that is about to change after Brexit because we can now act in an agile fashion and we have people at the centre of government who understand this stuff. 

🤣 We'll see.

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7 minutes ago, Surfer said:

Yes VW. But the Government that can decide the Brexit we get is the Government we have now. The voters of this country have not been consulted on that. So what we get is this Government's decision, and will be their legacy. The Loyal Opposition can make every effort to hold their feet to the fire to make the best arrangements and so should the British public. And the media should report that honestly and fairly (not that I'm expecting the British media to do any such thing) 

Exactly and the government will now do as they wish. The opportunity to have much greater parliamentary influence was there but was slaughtered on the alter of party politics. 

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It's often been a passing thought of mine that half the problem of the modern UK is the city. Making 'easy'  money out of money has become a way of life and led to the diminution of engineering and manufacturing as literally poor cousins. 

Successful economies have strong manufacturing bases I.e. Germany, China and yes even the USA. Germany and China run huge surpluses.

Frankly we'd do we'll to copy either for our long term benefit.

 

Edited by Yellow Fever
Same as Japan too

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I don't disagree with that VW. Joe Swinson has a lot to answer for. 

  • Like 1

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37 minutes ago, Surfer said:

I don't disagree with that VW. Joe Swinson has a lot to answer for. 

There is some truth in the idea that MPs could have found a way through, but that would have involved making correct assumptions about what was a complicated and fluid situation. If Remainers had been able to be certain they would not get a second referendum they could have thrown their support behind a softish Brexit, and probably got that. If May had not been such an incompetent and cowardly PM etc etc etc.

However the fundamental problem lay with the referendum itself, in two ways. For starters it was asking for a Yes/No answer on a complicated geo-political/economic/psychological (in a historical sense) question, so voters had to balance the tangible against the intangible.

And the result meant that while MPs were instructed to make Brexit happen, they were left with the job of deciding what kind of Brexit. On the face of it that was simple - the overwhelming motivation for the Leave vote was to restore a supposed lost sovereignty - so there had to be an absolute break away from the EU.

The only problem being that as any sane MP knew - despite the Leave campaign promises to the contrary -  such a break would scr*w the UK economy. It was that insoluble irreconcilability of the referendum result that defeated MPs.

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Yes I agree with all of that PurpleCanary. However when Joe Swinson made her catastrophic decision the combined opposition had the Government in an impossible position, unable to force a General Election, and with a Withdrawal Agreement winding its way through Parliament where the full extent of its nonsense could have been highlighted, then amended or voted down. But she threw all of that relative political advantage away, finished up giving a green light to Boris to do whatever he wants, and in the process destroyed her own party's parliamentary representation. 

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Swinson was **** with poor tactics.

Corbyn was **** with no tactics.

Johnson was **** with good tactics.

Only one had the weight of Murdoch, Rothermere and the Barclays behind them. Only one used Fakebook to spread massive amounts of propaganda to the general public (a tactic used to great advantage during the referendum.) Only one had Cummings, a sociopath, who knows how to play the public and is willing to use every dirty trick in the book to get his way, (i.e he's not a genius).

The LibDems and Labour took a plastic spoon to a knife fight and lost heavily.

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European Union (EU) is preparing to offer the UK a trade deal on tougher terms than its deals with Canada, Japan and a host of other leading trade partners.

Key quotes

The European Commission has warned EU member states that it would be a mistake to allow some UK industry bodies to be allowed to certify that goods conform to EU standards. 

The so-called Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs) are granted to other key EU trade partners to facilitate the smooth movement of goods in key sectors but could be withheld from the UK if it only seeks a basic trade deal. 

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Based on what the Chancellor said this week can you blame them? 
 

Whether they are right or wrong to do so, and whether they have animosity to the UK that is not deserved, the fact is this is the Brexit bed you decided to lie in. You own the outcome.

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Thank God the people of the UK saw what a thoroughly malign and vindictive organisation the EU is and turned their back on it !

With friends like these who needs enemies?

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2 hours ago, Herman said:

Brexit means Brexit Swindon. 

 

Edited by SwindonCanary
people who can't spell swindon

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6 minutes ago, SwindonCanary said:

Thank God the people of the UK saw what a thoroughly malign and vindictive organisation the EU is and turned their back on it !

With friends like these who needs enemies?

They're giving you exactly what you voted for ffs. 

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2 minutes ago, Herman said:

They're giving you exactly what you voted for ffs. 

No, they are starting on the wrong foot, threatening us. It will not work.

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Jesus Christ. They are treating us the way they would treat any third country. They don't have to do us any favours. Their main job is to get the best deal for themselves. It's very, very easy to understand. 

  • Like 1

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25 minutes ago, SwindonCanary said:

NOTHING MUCH

SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO

SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO

SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO

SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO

SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO

SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO SWINDO

Is and FVCKWIT and habitual LIAR. Annoying aint it.

 

Edited by SHRIMPER

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Serious Question, You took a long time doing that, was it worth it ? Even though you can't spell. How old are you ?

Edited by SwindonCanary

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35 minutes ago, SwindonCanary said:

Thank God the people of the UK saw what a thoroughly malign and vindictive organisation the EU is and turned their back on it !

With friends like these who needs enemies?

Actually 48% of voters didn’t Swindo 👍🏻

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6 minutes ago, SwindonCanary said:

Serious Question, You took a long time doing that, was it worth it ? Even though you can't spell. How old are you ?

Irony overload 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

  • Like 1

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1 hour ago, SwindonCanary said:

Thank God the people of the UK saw what a thoroughly malign and vindictive organisation the EU is and turned their back on it !

With friends like these who needs enemies?

This is the thoroughly malign EU that agreed to two (or was it three - I have lost count) extensions to the leaving date, at the request of the UK, and has offered to extend the transition period?

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