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Jools

The Brexit Thread

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8 minutes ago, ricardo said:

You are John McDonald and I claim my 5 quid.

Sorry, all the money has gone!

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Why is it always pensioners moaning that others want something for free??

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Labour's free broadband:

 

Friday evening get home from work, internet not working. After an hour on the phone to a call centre get through to a recorded message saying call centre closed on weekends.

Monday 8am: back to call-centre, after an hour on the phone get through to a recorded message saying technicians are on strike, no support available until further notice.

9:30 am at the bus stop. Couldn't top up your weekly ticket because no internet, and the driver won't change a twenty.

10:30am: arrive in the office having walked to work. All the computers down because Labour's free broadband still not fixed. Everybody sent home.

11:00am go to cash machine. Notice says due to technical issues with the network, ATMs  are not working

12:00 noon check out tills in the supermarket not working. Customers start panic buying but can't pay, fights break out as people leave without paying.

1:00pm Queues start building up at petrol stations as rumours spread that garages are no longer receiving supplies

5pm: Rioting breaks out in city centres as kids are deprived of Instagram and online gaming

6pm: City centres ablaze. Firemen on a four-day labour week refuse to attend fires.

7pm: Police stage work-to-rule, refuse to leave police stations

9pm: Prime Minister Corbyn orders Army out but only if they leave their weapons in their barracks.

What could possibly go wrong with free Labour Broadband?

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Herman said:

Why is it always pensioners moaning that others want something for free??

Because we realise that its an illusion. Theres only so much you can squeeze out of taxation, its not a bottomless pit. Neither is borrowing money from the future. Eventually there is a reckoning.

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8 minutes ago, Rock The Boat said:

Labour's free broadband:

 

Friday evening get home from work, internet not working. After an hour on the phone to a call centre get through to a recorded message saying call centre closed on weekends.

Monday 8am: back to call-centre, after an hour on the phone get through to a recorded message saying technicians are on strike, no support available until further notice.

9:30 am at the bus stop. Couldn't top up your weekly ticket because no internet, and the driver won't change a twenty.

10:30am: arrive in the office having walked to work. All the computers down because Labour's free broadband still not fixed. Everybody sent home.

11:00am go to cash machine. Notice says due to technical issues with the network, ATMs  are not working

12:00 noon check out tills in the supermarket not working. Customers start panic buying but can't pay, fights break out as people leave without paying.

1:00pm Queues start building up at petrol stations as rumours spread that garages are no longer receiving supplies

5pm: Rioting breaks out in city centres as kids are deprived of Instagram and online gaming

6pm: City centres ablaze. Firemen on a four-day labour week refuse to attend fires.

7pm: Police stage work-to-rule, refuse to leave police stations

9pm: Prime Minister Corbyn orders Army out but only if they leave their weapons in their barracks.

What could possibly go wrong with free Labour Broadband?

 

 

You do realise that most of the above has happened recently because the banks systems are rubbish.

 

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Why is it that people who are aways complaining about how the country isn't as well off as it used to be are always companying about what is working with proposals to invest in positive change so the economy and society can move forwards and not just stagnate? 

We can't just leave things to companies to "optimize" services, as they will "optimize" it for their own benefit. For example I pay plenty thank you very much for my internet at home. Is it broadband - just about. Are they charging me as if it were - yes. Is it 100Mbps rated as advertised - no. Do I need 100Mbps or more, no - I really don't and I'd rather services work out how to deliver great quality at lower bit rates, but the most important thing is I'd like the service not to go down 4 times a day thank you very much. Am I interested in Fiber-to-the-Home? No I don't care about that, I just need very reliable 100Mbps speed to the home, via satellite, cell tower or a wire. 

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The roads and cars / trucks analogy - the public owns the infrastructure and multiple operators run services on that infrastructure  is easy to apply to communications too. We already have things like that in place, and one of the reasons my own internet bill is to high compared to other countries is the wire to the home is owned by the cable TV company. They also offer internet services, and because they do there is no alternative to their internet service because a) the local Township gets a licensing fee from the cable company, and b) because the cable company has all the houses connected with a copper cable there is no financial incentive for them, or for any competitor, to run a fiber alternative to these homes either. Maybe the new high capacity 5G cellular network can be the missing "link" that lets the consumer bypass the cable company in the US - at least there are 4 (soon to be 3) cell phone companies vying for my business. 

Edited by Surfer

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2 hours ago, Van wink said:


"Labour’s broadband plan is a victory for outdated ideology over economic good sense. True, the UK has fallen badly behind many peers in broadband; fewer than 10 per cent of British homes and businesses can connect to a full-fibre network, against 75 per cent in Spain or 97 per cent in Japan. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has yet to flesh out his own breezy promise to invest £5bn in ensuring all British households enjoy “gigabit speeds” by 2025. Yet borrowing a mooted £15bn to buy Openreach and turn it into British Broadband is not the way to accelerate the fibre rollout. The complexities of nationalising Openreach and uncertainties it would create — including for other private-sector competitors — might only slow progress. State-owned businesses have not lost their propensity to turn into bloated, inefficient bureaucracies. Nor have the customer service demands involved in running high-speed data networks ever been a strength of government monopolies. Buying Openreach at a likely discount to market prices, moreover, would hit millions of people who hold BT shares directly or through their pension funds. Breaking up BT would create risks for its sizeable pension fund deficit. It would frighten away some domestic and foreign investment. Indeed, Labour’s sudden reversal on BT — which shadow chancellor John McDonnell had previously said was “not on the list” for nationalisation — will increase business jitters over its hostility to private enterprise. Funding future costs of maintaining the broadband network by slapping a tax on technology giants such as Google and Facebook could have a dampening effect on tech investment, one of the bright spots of the UK economy. While it might work as an electoral bribe, there is also no sound argument for making broadband free. Vital utilities such as water and electricity have never been free; neither has public service broadcasting. A government might choose to subsidise, say, the elderly or residents of rural or remote areas. But it is otherwise better to use scarce funds to increase health and social care spending. The benefits of privatisation have in some cases been obscured by annoyance over rising prices, overcrowding, or excessive profits and bosses’ pay. Market structures in some industries — such as rail — need reassessing. Future governments must develop more effective means of regulating utilities. But there were good reasons to privatise the lumbering state behemoths of the 1970s. There are few good reasons to turn the clock back now."

OK boomer

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38 minutes ago, ricardo said:

Because we realise that its an illusion. Theres only so much you can squeeze out of taxation, its not a bottomless pit. Neither is borrowing money from the future. Eventually there is a reckoning.

Yeah, we're the reckoning, we're now paying for you fu**ers getting cheap property, free higher education and gold plated pensions. You could get free broadband too, but this time you'd have to share it with everyone else. Boll*cks to that, free things are good but only if they're for you and no one else, eh boomer? 

Edited by canarydan23
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Blimey, this has stirred up the bigots.......................rather like the scene in Father Ted when the light is turned on in the retired priests home (Jurassic Park)

i suspect their ire would not be the same were this have been announced by the Tories - but that would be unlikely as there is no 'profit' in this and it smacks of forward planning not finacial grabbing. And the reality is that the private sector has failed dreadfully with only 8% full fibre optic coverage.

" This is significantly lower than many other parts of the EU – where only Belgium, Cyprus and Greece have lower levels of full-fibre coverage than the UK." Again something the bigots would be soiling themselves in rage were it to be the other way round.

 

Of course the senile will not value what they don't understand and waffle about nothing being free ................when they use the NHS, the road network, see their great grandchildren attend school, trust that the fire service is there along with the armed services................

Read hand crank's ill informed guff about the internet (earler today) to get a measure of how all this is beyond their grasp. And like brexit it is also a measure of how the ignorant and the stupid will always believe that they are somehow being done down by others.

 

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4 hours ago, Jools said:

Aye, BT stated earlier that they have a pensions liability of £62 Billion --- Magic Grandpa obviously forgot to add that to his plan.

Matters not though -- Labours mathematical genius, Diane Abbot, is undoubtedly going to make that figure disappear in a flash.

🧙‍♀️

Although I suspect not as quickly as Philip Green would make it disappear.

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The projected cost of HS2 - which will allow people from the North to get to London a bit quicker is now projected to be 100 billion, so you can add the acquisition of OpenReach plus all of the pension costs together and still have 15 billion Quid left over for actual fiber in the ground work, or more sensibly fiber to 5G cellular towers because the future of the internet is mobile devices as well as PC’s - the real costs in any project serving existing homes is the “last mile” or realistically the “ last 100 feet” connection that requires you to dig up the street. Wireless (cellular) obviously avoids that. 
 

But let’s have a (slightly higher) speed rail link instead ... that’s classic MBGA at work. 

Edited by Surfer

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So who is lying ?

Farage, who claims that the Tories tried to bribe some of his members by offering them peerages etc ?

or

the Tories who said no such offers were made ?

as they can't both be telling the truth, perhaps some of the brexiteers on here might care to enlighten the rest of us as to who is lying.

 

"In a tweet Mr Farage alleged: 'Even Boris Johnson’s Chief Strategic Adviser Sir Edward Lister is calling our candidates and offering them jobs if they withdraw. The system is corrupt and broken.'

The Conservative Party deny the allegations which, if true, would contravene Section 107, 'Corrupt withdrawal of candidature,' of the Representation of the People Act"

Edited by Bill

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Who to believe?? A bumch of habitual liars and conmen or a bunch of habitual liars and conmen?

Maybe that was their plan from the start. Muddy the water so much that you can't tell the turd from the silt.😀

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7 minutes ago, Herman said:

Who to believe?? A bumch of habitual liars and conmen or a bunch of habitual liars and conmen?

Maybe that was their plan from the start. Muddy the water so much that you can't tell the turd from the silt.😀

Talking of which what has happened to the 'stick insect', Rees-Mogg ?

Has he been hidden away after his clueless guff about the Grenfell fire ?

It's bad enough Johnson turning the Glastonbury bake off into the Boris run off, without Sajid Javid avoiding debating in public Labour's spending plans. Which, if are as bad as claimed, should be an open goal. Yet like the other two he shys away. Just as with the Withdrawal deal when it was to be scrutinised.

That 'something to hide' suspicion only grows greater when we learn that the two enquiries into Johnson's dodgy financial goings on with his previous floozy, and the even dodgier Russian money, funding the Tory party have both being 'delayed'.

The stench of corruption reeks to high heaven.

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Farage shares the stage with the last Jimmy Savile impersonator still working the circuit

_109711367_hi057861252.jpg

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1 minute ago, Bill said:

Farage shares the stage with the last Jimmy Savile impersonator still working the circuit

_109711367_hi057861252.jpg

I thought it was the Krankies on their comeback tour.

 

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Now this is what I hear from work colleagues as well. They don't like Johnson or the current Tory party but they don't want to have Corbyn as the leader and,thirdly, they are worried that voting LibDem would be a wasted vote or let one of the other two in. I have said from the start that an election was a stupid way to solve brexit and so it will prove to be.

 

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2 minutes ago, A Load of Squit said:

I thought it was the Krankies on their comeback tour.

I think the one on the left is singing

or perhaps not 😝

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"It was the night of 14 January 1978 and the **** Pistols’ acrimonious US tour was drawing to a weary end. Britain’s premium punk export had failed to live up to the hype and, as the band concluded a halfhearted encore at the Winterland, San Francisco, a sneering Johnny Rotten, weary of it all, turned on the audience and jeered contemptuously: “Ha, ha, ha – ever get the feeling you’ve been cheated?”

https://bylinetimes.com/2019/11/15/the-great-brexit-party-swindle/

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Aye, BT stated earlier that they have a pensions liability of £62 Billion --- Magic Grandpa obviously forgot to add that to his plan.

What a stupid statement. Unless someone will do a Maxwell before it is "part" nationalised. You still haven't acknowledged that yet have you.

image.jpeg.e9cbec47d297670fa64e3e9f6e00cc8f.jpeg

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This from George Eustice, the Tory MP for Camborne Redruth. An MP in a margianl and one who has done little more than demand we leave the EU but continues to employ foreign workers on his farms.

This morning we were canvassing in West Tolgus - an area some parties forget and in the afternoon we had a team out in Redruth. We were joined by David Harris, the former MP for St Ives, who still loves to get out talking to people. We had a very positive reception today. Lots of former Labour voters who can’t bring themselves to vote for Corbyn this time. I came across several loyal Lib Dem stalwarts who won’t change, but they were all polite and friendly in the best Cornish tradition. Then towards the end of the day we came across a Corbyn activist who followed us into the road in his pyjamas shouting in a hectoring manner and filming on his mobile in the way Momentum train them to behave. It was most bizarre, but this is the sort of behaviour that has caused so many decent Labour Party members to quit their party.

Now the real events

One of Cornwall’s Conservative candidates has been accused of lying while canvassing for the General Election.

George Eustice, who has been the MP for Camborne, Redruth and Hayle, has been accused of lying about one of his constituents on his Facebook campaign page.

Independent media website The Canary has reported that Mr Eustice posted that a “Corbyn activist” followed him while in Redruth “in his pyjamas shouting in a hectoring manner and filming on his mobile in the way Momentum train them to behave”.

However, a video posted on Twitter shows Mr Eustice approaching the man’s property which has a visible police notice that says “no cold callers”.

The man asks Mr Eustice a series of questions but is not heard to shout at any time.

Mr Eustice has been canvassing in his constituency in recent days as he seeks re-election. He’s also agriculture minister at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra).

 

After a day canvassing in the West Tolgus area of Redruth, Mr Eustice wrote on his Facebook campaign page: “Towards the end of the day we came across a Corbyn activist who followed us into the road in his pyjamas shouting in a hectoring manner and filming on his mobile in the way Momentum train them to behave.

"It was most bizarre, but this is the sort of behaviour that has caused so many decent Labour Party members to quit their party.”

Following his comments Sheffield Disabled People Against Cuts (DPAC) shared a video on Twitter  of the incident.

As reported on The Canary, the man in question speaks calmly saying Eustice has done “pretty much nothing” for this constituency and points out that he has a ‘no cold callers’ sign clearly visible in his window. When Mr Eustice walks away, the man – videoing on his phone – follows.

He can be heard saying to Mr Eustice: “I’m a postman, my wife’s a nurse, why am I going to vote for you; a Tory? You’ve done nothing for this area – absolutely nothing. What do you think about us postal workers? You’ve disturbed me on my day off, I’m a working man.”

The man says many people in the area intend to vote for the Labour candidate Paul Farmer.

Eustice tells the man to “go back to sleep”.

A source told The Canary that the man in question is not a “Momentum member let alone having been ‘trained’ by them”.

Eustice has nothing for the area. The reason the area is undergoing a transformation is it has had the most money of any area in the UK from the EU. And that money has been well spent in regenerating some old tin mine areas, providing wonderful link roads to the A30 and leisure areas for the community.

The Labour candidate Paul Farmer is generating widespread support and is going to have a very good chance of taking the seat from Useless Eustice (remember him?)

 

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Why will nobody be surprised at this ?

"The Brexit Party has selected a candidate to vie for the approval of voters in Tynemouth... who lives 9,000 miles away in Australia.

Ed Punchard runs a documentary-making business in Fremantle, western Australia, but says he is ready to leave if he should be elected next month. He has lived in Australia for 30 years

So many jokes to be made there ...................... 😁

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5 hours ago, Bill said:

So many jokes to be made there ...................... 😁

Yet you, the self-professed comedy writer, can't think of one...  🙃

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lizzi.jpg?w=540&ssl=1

Labour’s candidate in Morecambe and Lunesdale has been reported to the police for providing falsified information on her nomination papers. Lizzi Collinge is listed on the nomination papers as residing in ‘An address in Morecambe and Lunesdale’, when her home address is, in reality, in Lancaster and Fleetwood.

Collinge declared her address as in another constituency when running for County Council in 2017, in a house she purchased in 2013 and has not been up for sale or rent since. The last electoral roll address to which Collinge was registered was the home she purchased in 2013, where she was listed as living at until December. Since then a new address for her hasn’t appeared in either her old or new constituency…

The last Labour Candidate in the same constituency allegedly tried the same trick listing herself as living in the constituency at the last minute.

 

😑

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6140ec5f-c9d0-4d94-b8c2-e10d39dd0cb5.jpg

Fresh from Labour’s announcement they want to run all broadband, the party has now published Richard Burgon’s response to crime figures… only, they haven’t posted it at all; It’s blank 😀To be fair, this is about as much of the farting commie Guido ever wants to hear from…

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