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I sat in section G last night row EE there was a bloke about 2 rows behind us constantly shouting ,commenting on the game and shouting the F word and C word loudly , to his right there was a Dad and his daughter roughly about 10 years old ,I know it always happens but this was over the top .felt sorry for the family people in the stand .

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1 minute ago, Yellowhammer said:

I sat in section G last night row EE there was a bloke about 2 rows behind us constantly shouting ,commenting on the game and shouting the F word and C word loudly , to his right there was a Dad and his daughter roughly about 10 years old ,I know it always happens but this was over the top .felt sorry for the family people in the stand .

I'd advise if they don't want to hear swearing then book for the family area.

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Some people are a ridiculously over the top with the amount of swearing but the best thing to do is sit in one of the family enclosures which are actually, conveniently, the easiest places to get tickets for too.

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Don't think that's the answer, same in rows above me, a couple who start on the linesman from the kick off, sure trying to intimidate him with their offensive language and constant questioning his decisions.

Don't think you need to F and blind to show your support.

 

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11 hours ago, Yellowhammer said:

I sat in section G last night row EE there was a bloke about 2 rows behind us constantly shouting ,commenting on the game and shouting the F word and C word loudly , to his right there was a Dad and his daughter roughly about 10 years old ,I know it always happens but this was over the top .felt sorry for the family people in the stand .

Wow, they were both 10 years old! :classic_ohmy:

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Although I’m by no means proud of it...I swear A LOT when watching Norwich. I think it is part and parcel of watching football to be honest. I always remember going to my first game at about 10 years old and hearing ‘The referee’s a w**ker’...I don’t think it’s had a overly detrimental impact on my life

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Posted (edited)

Done my bit to help prevent this scourge - tried to start a chant when I was about 6 or 7 of "the referee is a one eyed elephant".... Surprisingly didn't catch on, so gave it up as a lost cause and got myself a potty mouth.

To be fair, much like Zema, I swear a fair bit watching Norwich. If I'm sat near kids then I do moderate my language as I would hope others will when my little girl is old enough to join our ranks, however, I also buy into it being part and parcel of football and it doesn't offend me to hear it. The family stand exists for a reason, and if you are sat elsewhere then it comes with the territory and it's tricky to expect others to inhibit their own behaviour because you have chosen to sit elsewhere in the ground.

I do understand what the OP is saying though, some people go way OTT with this and it ends up sounding like the Jeremy Kyle show has gone on tour.

Edited by kick it off

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I do understand that swearing is part and parcel of modern life and expect to hear it in talk between mates ect   but this guy was shouting it out loudly above everyone else all through the match.  Did enjoy the match apart from the ending .thanks for comments 

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6 minutes ago, Yellowhammer said:

I do understand that swearing is part and parcel of modern life and expect to hear it in talk between mates ect

For a lot of young people it is part of everyday language, the younger ones at work use the f and c words without a thought. Call me sexist if you want but hearing a girl use the c word is horrible in my opinion. I obviously don’t like it but accept that others do swear and I try to ignore it and let it go in one ear and out of the other. 

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I'm guilty of blurting out the occasional expletive. I definitely use Carrow Road as place to let out all my pent up anger; usually directed at the referee. It's easy to forget that it will have an impact on the people around us and, on reflection, it is not the kind of behaviour I want to demonstrate - especially in front of children.

Thanks for calling this out. I think a lot of us on here could do with being a little bit more thoughtful in our choice of words.

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In the latest TNC podcast Chris tells a story about his late Mum telling him as a kid that he wasn't allowed to swear, except at the football, and I think that's the way lots of people see it.

Some people use matches as a release and an opportunity to shout and swear in ways they wouldn't in any other part of their life, and I think that's okay provided it isn't intruding on others enjoyment of the game. Perhaps I'm too much of a middle aged codger now but I really enjoy just watching the game so don't go in for much shouting or swearing.

I've never seen it, but is there some sort of policy on swearing at the ground? Has anyone ever seen a steward get involved in these situations? I presume you would get dealt with pretty swiftly if you were shouting racist abuse but I'm not sure what would happen if someone complained about swearing?

 

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On 11/04/2019 at 10:59, king canary said:

I'd advise if they don't want to hear swearing then book for the family area.

True, but not really a very responsible attitude. I always try and temper my language in general, more so when there are children around me. 

Of course everyone lets out bad language on occasion when passions are running high - but as a general rule; if I wouldn't behave like it in public outside of the ground, I try not to behave like it in the ground. Don't really understand the mentality of using the football as an excuse to "let off some steam", but no doubt this is how a fair percentage of people see it.

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Taking kids to a football match does make you think differently about your own and others behaviour.

Remember taking my daughter to her first game (away v Birmingham) she was absolutely terrified when she heard the noise from the supporters inside the bar area. I just hadn’t thought about how intimidating an atmosphere it is for young kids. It was all good spirits and pre match chanting  but a shock to her.

When I take my young son now I have to be careful with my own language and do wince a bit when I hear some of the more extreme expletives from others around us.

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1 hour ago, Ian said:

True, but not really a very responsible attitude. I always try and temper my language in general, more so when there are children around me. 

Of course everyone lets out bad language on occasion when passions are running high - but as a general rule; if I wouldn't behave like it in public outside of the ground, I try not to behave like it in the ground. Don't really understand the mentality of using the football as an excuse to "let off some steam", but no doubt this is how a fair percentage of people see it.

The world doesn't have to fit around peoples children. I'm about to become a father and if I took my child to a game I'd make sure I was in the family area. 

I also generally try and be a bit less sweary if there are small kids around but if others don't I don't blame them- there is a specific area for families where I'd argue a different etiquette applies.

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On 11/04/2019 at 10:57, Yellowhammer said:

I sat in section G last night row EE there was a bloke about 2 rows behind us constantly shouting ,commenting on the game and shouting the F word and C word loudly , to his right there was a Dad and his daughter roughly about 10 years old ,I know it always happens but this was over the top .felt sorry for the family people in the stand .

I take my 11 year daughter alot, and even in the city stand I'm shocked by some of the f and c words I hear, but she won't stop it.

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Anybody who complains about this reminds me of those who used to complain about my kids splashing them in a swimming pool.

 

There's only one way to avoid it.

 

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3 hours ago, Petriix said:

I'm guilty of blurting out the occasional expletive. I definitely use Carrow Road as place to let out all my pent up anger; usually directed at the referee. It's easy to forget that it will have an impact on the people around us and, on reflection, it is not the kind of behaviour I want to demonstrate - especially in front of children.

Thanks for calling this out. I think a lot of us on here could do with being a little bit more thoughtful in our choice of words.

Bravo, Sir! Well said.

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Petriix said:

I'm guilty of blurting out the occasional expletive. I definitely use Carrow Road as place to let out all my pent up anger; usually directed at the referee. It's easy to forget that it will have an impact on the people around us and, on reflection, it is not the kind of behaviour I want to demonstrate - especially in front of children.

Thanks for calling this out. I think a lot of us on here could do with being a little bit more thoughtful in our choice of words.

Yes, I agree.

I wasn't sure whether to call the referee a ****, **** or a total **** on Saturday. 🤬

In the end I settled upon all three when clearly everyone could see he was a complete ****. 🤬

Edited by Drazen Muzinic

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1 minute ago, Drazen Muzinic said:

Yes, I agree.

I wasn't sure whether to call the referee a ****, **** or a total **** on Saturday. 🤬

In the end I settled upon all three when clearly everyone could see he was a complete ****. 🤬

 

 

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40 minutes ago, king canary said:

The world doesn't have to fit around peoples children. I'm about to become a father and if I took my child to a game I'd make sure I was in the family area. 

I also generally try and be a bit less sweary if there are small kids around but if others don't I don't blame them- there is a specific area for families where I'd argue a different etiquette applies.

I wasn't aware the family area is soundproofed and where did anybody say "the world" has to revolve around peoples' children? In addition, there's plenty of other people (some close to me) who cannot believe the ridiculously over the top nature of certain folks' language. Congratulations on your imminent arrival, but as a parent I can tell you that I would almost certainly not take my impressionable 9-year old daughter to a game.

And just to clarify before you try and assume the moral high-ground, we're not talking about the odd expletive here and there which is no problem to anybody, but those who constantly c bomb throughout the match when they are well aware there's kids about.

I'm surprised at your attitude to be honest - everyone is aware there's a family area, but I would expect most people to take into consideration who is around them regardless of where they sit in the ground.

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Swearing is a tricky one to stop. I think most people who swear sometimes are able to avoid it when there are other people about. But for some it is part of their vocabulary.

I stand on the terrace of the local rugby club and for a physical and brutal game, their is hardly any swearing. The word "jesus ref" is used a lot but miniscule swearing.

What concerned me a couple of matches ago was the copycat from the Colts who were sat in the stand after their match had finished. A fight started on the pitch and a black player from the opposition had one of lads on the ground, punching his eye.

The Colts started up a chant of "You Black Ba*@ard". Angry looks from the rest of us and they shut up straight away. We were shocked and complained to the club Chairman. Especially as my mate's son in law is Black. Totally new to the game of rugby I must say and just a copycat from something else.

 

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36 minutes ago, Ian said:

I wasn't aware the family area is soundproofed and where did anybody say "the world" has to revolve around peoples' children? In addition, there's plenty of other people (some close to me) who cannot believe the ridiculously over the top nature of certain folks' language. Congratulations on your imminent arrival, but as a parent I can tell you that I would almost certainly not take my impressionable 9-year old daughter to a game.

And just to clarify before you try and assume the moral high-ground, we're not talking about the odd expletive here and there which is no problem to anybody, but those who constantly c bomb throughout the match when they are well aware there's kids about.

I'm surprised at your attitude to be honest - everyone is aware there's a family area, but I would expect most people to take into consideration who is around them regardless of where they sit in the ground.

I'd agree with you in that example. I think for me personally I'm keen not to try and regulate what people can and can't say at the match even if I might not like some of it. I've always hated the 'we shoot burglers' or the 'Kicked his f*cking head in' chants but wouldn't tell someone they couldn't sing them because of me. I've also had someone tell me to pipe down the Jarrold despite him spending the entire game with his headphones in so I've certainly come across those who seem to think the world revolves around what they want to hear.

What concerns me more than the words used is often the tone- some purple faced bloke spitting with rage because we didn't get a freekick is far more intimidating and concerning to me even if they watch their P's and Q's than someone saying '****s sake ref' and leaving it at that.

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I'll swear whenever I darn-diddily-a-tootin' like, and no c@#t will tell me otherwise.

Sorry, I've had a beer, I should have censored the darn-diddily too.  

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11 hours ago, Peanuts said:

 

I've never seen it, but is there some sort of policy on swearing at the ground? Has anyone ever seen a steward get involved in these situations? I presume you would get dealt with pretty swiftly if you were shouting racist abuse but I'm not sure what would happen if someone complained about swearing?

 

I vaguely remember when Cloughie put signs up at the City Ground back in the 80s and for a while it was a talking point. 

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Posted (edited)

It's not the biggest crime in the world and quite benign in the grand scheme of things, but there's a time and a place. It won't break bones but we don't live in the Dark Ages after all, although it seems that with some Anglo-Saxon is the only second language they are capable of. Swear words are crude and allude to the sexual act and bodily functions in the most basic way so there is therefore something unpleasant about them at their core.

Thus swearing aloud in a public place illustrates a lack of class and surely demonstrates a lack of self-respect as well as disrespect for others.

Most of us swear but then most of us swear only when appropriate. I can with the best of them, especially on the golf course, but would never use foul language in mixed or unfamiliar company or in front of my mother quaintly enough, saving it for when alone or with friends of the same ilk. If a ladies foursome is following us up then we all automatically behave like perfect gentlemen, despite the crudest slice or missed short put. We never swear, we leave that to the ladies behind us.

The golfer John Rahm let out the 'F' word last night in the Masters when his tee shot went array. It was loud enough to be heard by the television audience so must have resonated with the very mixed crowd around the teeing area. If there is any sporting event in the world were decorum is needed it is this one, where standards (some disagreeable) are set high and perfection is sought in everything they do. I wonder if anything will come of it , he's somewhat of a 'role model' after all, and the fact that the commentator saw fit to apologise  demonstrates surely that Rahm's actions were beyond the acceptable.

It does seem strange, in this politically correct world, where you have to be careful with everything you say or write, that swearing becomes increasingly rife on stage, screen and in public, but it still remains an unsophisticated thing to do in the wrong company and could be seen as the thin end of the wedge in a society which seems to have a split personality when it comes to accepting matters of morality.

Swearing is easy, perhaps avoiding it at inappropriate times is more difficult, and that's the crux of the matter. Perhaps, like cigarette smoking before it it will eventually become the "un-clever" thing to do.

Edited by BroadstairsR
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