Jump to content
Note to existing users - password reset is required Read more... ×
Sign in to follow this  
Jools

To all the Pink 'Un Labour people here:

Recommended Posts

I just want you to know how much those on the Right are gloating about Corbyn''s victory [:|] Your distress gives me/us huge pleasure [Y][:D]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If he concentrates on what matters to the people, like the NHS, worker''s rights and housing then he may start improving. If he carries on with things like Trident for example, then we are all stuffed with an incompetent right-wing government for decades. His enormous problem is that he doesn''t have a single media outlet on his side, so he we will have to use social media so much more to get his message out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The ''EU Straw poll'' thread was a good opportunity for some proper political debate and letting off steam, but now seems to have run its course as people have moved on.

If you wanted to start a similar debate about Cornyn, that wasn''t the way to do it Jools.

Remember, ''Better Red Than a Racist Twunt''.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote user="ricardo"]I''m getting my flaired strides and platform boots out of storage.Back to the 70''s, here we come.[/quote]And back to the 50s with the Tories. A modern, forward looking party wouldn''t go amiss.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am of the Right but I am not gloating. Corbyn needs to be seen as a threat. When he rids the Labour Party of New Labour MPs he will then concentrate his efforts on presenting the purity of his Marxist beliefs to a certain section of society who is ready and willing to listen to him.

This section is young and impressionable. They are ready to mobilise on any pretext from immigration to animal welfare and any issue in between. These people do not remember the 70''s, but as ever that wise owl ricardo is correct when he says it will be back to the era of flared jeans.

Politics will take to the streets once again as Marxists don''t believe in things like parliamentary democracy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote user="Rock The Boat"]I am of the Right but I am not gloating. Corbyn needs to be seen as a threat. When he rids the Labour Party of New Labour MPs he will then concentrate his efforts on presenting the purity of his Marxist beliefs to a certain section of society who is ready and willing to listen to him.

This section is young and impressionable. They are ready to mobilise on any pretext from immigration to animal welfare and any issue in between. These people do not remember the 70''s, but as ever that wise owl ricardo is correct when he says it will be back to the era of flared jeans.

Politics will take to the streets once again as Marxists don''t believe in things like parliamentary democracy.[/quote]Ah yes, the young and impressionable - those so-called intellectual and academic Socialists who have seen Socialism fail around the world but still think that it''ll work with a Marxist at the helm - then there''s all the Public Sector workers wanting a bigger state and a bumper pay rise every year - the feckless wanting more benefits - Immigrants wanting more friends and relatives to join them and Trade Union bosses wanting more power over the rest of us...It''s okay though, RtB - they''re only around 26% of the populace [Y]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe the young see ''hope'' in Corbyn. A different way of doing things where they may have a chance to flourish. All you right wingers offer them is darkness,anger,austerity and a lifetime of debt . Maybe, just maybe, they don''t want the shit the tories and ukip are offering. And quite frankly, I don''t blame them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote user="Herman"]Maybe the young see ''hope'' in Corbyn. A different way of doing things where they may have a chance to flourish. All you right wingers offer them is darkness,anger,austerity and a lifetime of debt . Maybe, just maybe, they don''t want the shit the tories and ukip are offering. And quite frankly, I don''t blame them.

[/quote]So that fateful 13 years of Labour, 10 of Blair and 3 of the Brown stuff, where the majority of today''s problems stem from gets them off the hook in your estimation? [:O] There are a myriad of problems, but allow me to concentrate on your correct statement that youngsters have little hope these days:  During that fateful 13 years, children started to cost more to learn less - a third of secondary school pupils had some record of truancy -- most school-leavers were tossed exam certificates without achieving real skills in literacy and numeracy, never mind knowledge and universities fell victim to class-war -- unqualified teenagers from state schools were pushed towards Oxbridge, while private school pupils were deliberately excluded which caused a drain on excellence - furthermore, under-funded British universities, subject to relentless government meddling, slipped ever further behind their American counterparts.Then regard those youngsters in the workplace -- Labour promoted employee rights at the expense of a crippling impact on productivity, in which Britain slipped ever further down on the global scale.And you want more of the same, if not worse! [:O]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well we''ve only had a few years of your mates in charge and so far;Poverty has risen.Homelessness has risen.Food bank use has risen.The NHS is on its knees.The train network is falling apart.(Southern).Immigration has risen.Adult training has fallen.State assets have been sold off cheap.The banks are still crippled and misbehaving.They have taken us out of the EU and the mess that will entail.Zero hour contracts are rising.This is only a few of the bad things this government are doing. And you want more of the same?New Labour got a fair few things wrong, not least the wars, but they invested a lot in the countries infrastructure and brought this place into the 21st century. You only have to go around the major cities and have a look. London, Manchester, Liverpool, Hull, Bristol. They even got the NHS running reasonably properly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you remember the 70''s, Jules? Jeez, apart from the music that was the sh!ttiest decade in modern times. 3-day working week, power cuts, runaway inflation, unions on strike, British Leyland and Red Robbo, the unburied dead, uncollected rubbish piled high in the street.

We ended the 70s as a failed state with the country on its knees begging the IMF for a loan to keep us from going bankrupt.

And the Marxist tw@ts in the Labour Party want to take us back to those days.

There was an interesting footnote on the news the other day about the Labour Party conference just finished, They were all agitated about the return of grammar schools, hlding up their little posters saying ''No segregation''. And yet who had sent their kids to private schools or grammars? None other than Diane Abbot, Emily Thornberry (aka Lady Nugee), Seumas Milne, Lord Falconer, Harriet Harman, ruth Kelly. So clearly Marxism won''t be for the fattest of pigs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There''s a certain level of hypocrisy there. But is it better or worse than millionaires telling people to tighten their belts and taking money off the poor and disabled?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BTW. Most people think a return to grammars is a poor idea. Selective schools like this will not lift up standards but drive them down. Maybe if the government properly invested in our current schools instead of tinkering around the edges then they might all improve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, seriously:Nick BrownShami ChakrabartiDiane AbbottJo Stevens Sarah ChampionKeir Starmer Jonathan Reynolds[:D]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote user="Jools"]Okay, seriously:Nick BrownShami ChakrabartiDiane AbbottJo Stevens Sarah ChampionKeir Starmer Jonathan Reynolds[:D][/quote]

Top four shadow offices of state - leader, home, foreign and chancellor all held by London MPs [:|] Really reaching out to the northern heartlands there [:D]

More UKIP voters [Y]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote user="Herman"]BTW. Most people think a return to grammars is a poor idea. Selective schools like this will not lift up standards but drive them down. Maybe if the government properly invested in our current schools instead of tinkering around the edges then they might all improve.[/quote]

Herman

Why do you think selective schools like grammars will drive down standards. Standards have fallen dramatically since grammers were abandoned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Standards have fallen because every time a new government comes in they tinker about with education, bring in new ''innovative'' systems (cost cutting), destroy the old systems before they''ve even taken root and make a mess. What is needed is an all party long term plan to up standards, not some sup to pretend they''re doing something.All that''ll happen with grammars is that the best will be selected, they''ll get more funding, the better teachers and the rest will be crammed into badly built dumps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It''s quite laughable regarding Hermans statements

Look at the poor homeless with their cans of Special brew, Nike trainers, latest I Phones never short of a bob or two

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just on the point of education, standards are atrocious and that isnt labour''s fault. Labour spent billions rebuilding schools neglected by the Tories and education was heading in the right direction. Then along came the Tories. The Education sector has been devastated by incompetent c**ts running the dept since 2010. First Gove and then Nicky Morgan who absolutely decimated education with pointless reforms and shitty ideas. Between those 2 they have done more damage to education in this country than most people realise. They have set it back decades.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And i dont say that as a labour apologist. Although im left of centre, i no longer have any faith in the labour party. The worst part about the leadership challenge was that it even happened. Not because i have a great love for Corbyn but just because of the way 170 sycophantic tw**s in the PLP thought they had the right to try and undermine 300k members. To be honest after the Brexit debacle when the turkeys literally voted for christmas, im not even sure democracy is all that great anymore! Il vote at the next election and il hold my nose and vote labour as theyre the only ones who can beat the tories round here but my vote is an anti-tory vote rather than a pro-labour one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote user="kick it off"]Just on the point of education, standards are atrocious and that isnt labour''s fault.[/quote] Not Labour''s fault -- spent over a decade dumbing down education.Not Labour''s fault -- they made qualifications in cake decorating ‘equivalent’ to physics GCSE.Not Labour''s fault -- they allowed calculators in primary maths tests.Not Labour''s fault -- they broke up GCSEs into bite sized modules ensuring a constant treadmill of exams that became easier and easier.Not Labour''s fault -- they even tried to abolish proper subjects and replace them with ‘learning themes’.On Labour leaving governement in 2010 an OECD report was released on education standards -- it read that those aged 16-24 in England came 22nd of 24 for literacy and 21st for numeracy, putting England behind almost every other advanced nation in the world.But it wasn''t Labour''s fault [:|]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote user="Jools"][quote user="kick it off"]Just on the point of education, standards are atrocious and that isnt labour''s fault.[/quote] Not Labour''s fault -- spent over a decade dumbing down education.Not Labour''s fault -- they made qualifications in cake decorating ‘equivalent’ to physics GCSE.Not Labour''s fault -- they allowed calculators in primary maths tests.Not Labour''s fault -- they broke up GCSEs into bite sized modules ensuring a constant treadmill of exams that became easier and easier.Not Labour''s fault -- they even tried to abolish proper subjects and replace them with ‘learning themes’.On Labour leaving governement in 2010 an OECD report was released on education standards -- it read that those aged 16-24 in England came 22nd of 24 for literacy and 21st for numeracy, putting England behind almost every other advanced nation in the world.But it wasn''t Labour''s fault [:|][/quote]
Remarkable how similar your post is to THIS ARTICLE .... Word for word and even make the points in the same order.... The more cynical amongst us may take the opinion you don''t have a clue what you''re talking about and are copy and pasting from one single article you googled. 
Poor effort Jools, albeit all too predictable.Ask any teachers, you know, the people who actually know what they''re talking about with regards to education, and work in schools on a day to day basis, like myself, and they''ll tell you exactly the same thing. The Tories are as useless handling education as they are with the NHS.
Rather than regurgitating nonsense, please explain why you believe calculators in primary tests are a bad thing. I''m intrigued as to your nuanced critique seeing as we live in an increasingly digital society, I personally would have thought that getting youngsters using technology as early as possible was a GOOD thing? Various studies have concluded different things about calculator usage at primary, however the most useful in my opinion would be the ones which have focussed on how the usage of calculators at Primary impacted children''s attitudes to Maths and school in general, and they all point to children being more engaged in maths and having a higher self esteem across all curriculum areas. 
Any educator will tell you the most important factor in learning is engagement of the students, so would you prefer we went back to the abacus and kids all hating maths? That seems counter-productive to me. Calculators are a tool for learning and require a knowledge and understanding of maths to use them effectively - they were only ever allowed in one test out of the two by the way, which strangely, is the same as GCSEs so some may argue that children are better prepared for later exams if they have had opportunity to use calculators in primary testing.
If you had known what you were talking about, you would understand that putting value on vocational skills such as cake decorating mean that lower level ability students have opportunity to gain some meaningful qualifications. You take cake decorating as it is an easy target, but do you put the same scorn on qualifications such as mechanics, plumbing or building? Aren''t those the exact same kind of skills that you Brexwits are advocating teaching our youth to fill the skills gap? Yes, cake decorating is a namby pamby subject, but have you seen the price of wedding cakes for example? Cake decorating is an ideal entrepreneurial endeavour for some, and I actually went to school with someone who now runs her own successful business making and decorating novelty cakes. Isn''t that the kind of spirit you want to encourage in the youth of the nation, rather than the benefits culture that you constantly criticise?
Maybe if the Tories hadn''t completely neglected education for decades, then Labour could have spent more money improving the learning outcomes, instead of having to pump money into the BSF programme to rebuild the nation''s schools. One of the first programmes to be cut after Cameron took charge I hasten to add. Shame really, as a school system with the latest technology in every classroom would probably be beneficial in building this multi-skilled utopia that you believe Britain is on the cusp of achieving. As it is, you can thank Labour for 1 in 5 children learning in state of the art of facilities. You can thank the Tories for the 4 out of 5 in old buildings with outdated technology. 
Labour didn''t get everything right with education, but they did a lot of good things. I struggle to name a single positive thing the Tories have done in education in the last 6 years. It''s funny how it''s the right wing press harping on about exams getting easier under Labour, with no evidence to substantiate that claim, then again, giving Labour credit for drastically improving exam results would be a stretch too far for the agenda driven Mail/Express etc. That suits their angle perfectly though as they can say the Tories are making it harder, rather than admitting the Tories are failing the education sector resulting in declining pass rates. You can find a working paper on the subject of Labour''s education legacy here - I''ve copied and pasted the outcomes section for you below. 
"We now turn to trends in educational outcomes. Headline measures of academic attainment improved

substantially over the Labour period. The patterns are different at primary (Key Stage 2) and secondary (Key

Stage 4).

At Key Stage 2, the ‘expected level’ of attainment is ‘Level 4’. There was a sharp improvement in the proportion

achieving Level 4 in the late 1990s. Achievement then seemed to plateau between 1999/00 and 2002/03, before

rising again slightly through to 2008, and stalling again thereafter (Table 8 and Figure 9). By 2009/10, 80 per cent

of pupils were achieving Level 4 in English and in maths, compared with 63 per cent in English and 62 per cent in

maths in 1996/7. However this was adrift of Labour’s target of 85 per cent. 
At Key Stage 4 (GCSE) the standard measure is the achievement of ‘five good GCSEs’, meaning five GCSEs or

equivalent qualifications at grades A*-C. From 2005/06, the proportion achieving five good GCSEs including

English and Maths was also monitored (also shown in Table 8 and Figure 10).8

On the standard measure, GCSE results increased steadily at a rate of between one and two percentage points

each year until 2003/4. After 2003/4 they began to improve more sharply, and then with a step change upwards

after 2007. On this measure, Labour met its target. By 2010, 76 per cent were achieving 5 A*-C, compared with

45 per cent in 1997. The proportion of pupils achieving five GCSEs including English and Maths also increased,

and more so after 2007, but less rapidly than the proportion achieving the qualifications in any combination of

subjects." 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote user="Jools"][quote user="kick it off"]Just on the point of education, standards are atrocious and that isnt labour''s fault.[/quote] Not Labour''s fault -- spent over a decade dumbing down education.Not Labour''s fault -- they made qualifications in cake decorating ‘equivalent’ to physics GCSE.Not Labour''s fault -- they allowed calculators in primary maths tests.Not Labour''s fault -- they broke up GCSEs into bite sized modules ensuring a constant treadmill of exams that became easier and easier.Not Labour''s fault -- they even tried to abolish proper subjects and replace them with ‘learning themes’.On Labour leaving governement in 2010 an OECD report was released on education standards -- it read that those aged 16-24 in England came 22nd of 24 for literacy and 21st for numeracy, putting England behind almost every other advanced nation in the world.But it wasn''t Labour''s fault [:|]

[/quote]
All of it true, unfortunately for our kids.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×