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[quote user="John"][quote user="Shyster"][quote user="John"][quote user="Shyster"][quote user="John"][quote user="morty"][quote user="Shyster"][quote user="morty"][quote user="Herman "]

[quote user="Herb"]Bizarrely, Squeeze and the Clash today.Bit of a late 70s early 80s thing I have going on at the moment.[/quote]

Here you go.Squeeze live in 1982! Tonight on BBC4

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00v7xjd

 

[/quote]For me, the best lyricists / musical genius bands of the last 20 or 30 years are :-Morrissey / SmithsSqueezePaul Weller / The JamIan Dury[/quote]

And all four heavily influenced by Bowie - especially Morrissey and Weller.[/quote]Theres undiscovered tribes in darkest Africa that knew you''d bring Bowie into this [;)](Don''t worry, I rate him too, though he''s no Morrissey)[/quote]I''m going to take Morty''s side on this i''m afraid. Bowie is a great groundbreaking artist, the influence he commands in the music industry stretches out far and wide, and he''s very effectively derived the influence of many of the other great artists that preceded him into his own songs (so as to put it into context for Shyster that music didn''t start with David Bowie in case he ''may'' of thought otherwise [;)]).... But then of course, he''s no Morrissey.[/quote]

Yes, I realise music didn''t start with Bowie, John, but there''s no denying that he IS the most influential artist of all time.The sight and sound of Morrissey on stage almost caused my first ever walk out (or more accurately, drag out) of a Bowie concert - nothing against Morrissey myself, but it was my wife''s first big concert and it was a hard sell even to get her to go to something like that - her suspicions that it would be some musically inept egomaniac caterwauling over an abominable sound being more or less confirmed by Mozza, she looked at me menacingly and said "If Bowie''s not 100% better than that, we''re leaving, you cu*nt".Ever since then, she insisted we time our arrival so that we don''t have to endure support acts, and the sight of Morrissey is still enough to start her ranting.[/quote]1. Haha, no Shyster, David Bowie is not. He''s up there, but he''s not (i should reckon we''re simply going to have to agree to differ on this one, seeing as Bowie is quite obviously the be all and end all in your catalogue of music your in the know of).2. "her suspicions that it would be some musically inept egomaniac

caterwauling over an abominable sound being more or less confirmed by

Mozza" - Wow. Deary me, as a ''memory'' one would of thunk it to be just a little vivid. Unless she wrote that very description to you herself, in black and white, the depth of loathing repugnance in that statement could surely only be conveyed by the protagonist?3. Pardon the intrusion Shyster, but you''re wife has made one tragic decision in trying to avoid supporting acts because of one solitary disappointment, and i certainly hope this has no reflection on your good self. On so many occasions you can find the highlight of the night is the support act. My mother''s boyfriend for one has played in tons of bands in the past, and boasts a berth of knowledge about music of all genre''s i''ve never known anyone else to have, and because of it, the authority he speaks on the subject is matched by a very rare few. I should imagine your take on Bowie, and your wifes take on the ''deplorable'' idea of the "supporting act", makes you exactly the type of people that he, in all fairness, would want burnt at the stake. I''m genuinely sorry to say it, but it all stinks of being way too close minded in a subject that has so much to offer, that your wife, you, me, as well as most, if not all the world, know but only a tiny fraction about in the grand scheme of it all.One example out of the other few others thousands that escape my mind, is that of Arcade Fire as the supporting act to U2 in their 2006 Vertigo tour, and utterly dwarfed Bono and his ''disciples'' on stage. A band David Bowie has not only regularly performed with in the past few years, but has himself dubbed as the best band he''s heard since "YONKS!!!", and one of the many great bands you and your wife would miss out on because of a mere distasteful outing one night so many years ago.[/quote]

Oh well, that''s it then, end of debate - John''s mums'' boyfriend plays guitar in several second-rate bands making him an authority on all things music.[/quote]You haven''t quite caught the jist of what i was saying Shyster. It''s more that the impression you give to everyone on here when it comes to music is that your very close minded, and more stubborn in defending what you know than you are in expanding and diversifying your taste and knowledge of music. Thus you making such an enormously contentious and rather firmly put statement is bound to be attacked by many, especially considering that the ground on which you preach the greatness of Bowie is a very thin one, not only because of the brief and tenuous argument you put behind it, but your own ''unique'' approach to music as it is.

Anyway, it''s not just the fact he''s plyed his trade as a ''drummer and singer'' for plenty of bands that don''t field in the mainstream, but that his life revolves around music, and it always has. Records take up approximately 75% percent of the entire mass of our household, without even going into how many LP''s he has placed in storage, he goes to local gigs very regularly, performing or not, and he''s mixed with artists high and low, from The Ramones to The Damned, in the industry in his time. He decides no one''s taste but his own though, of course, but people with that kind of well versed understanding of the industry are those more apt to substantiate such a discussion, and i''d gander not one person of that ilk would dare make as bold a statement as you have, and they''d rather sensibly choose not to do so also.[/quote]

It''s because I''m a music fan that I can''t stand those c-class acts that are forced on me by the record companies when I go to see and hear an act of my choice - I''ve witnessed hundreds of gigs in my time, so I do actually know what I''m talking about here - how about your live experiences, Johnny boy?And before you draw the wrong conclusions again, my opinion towards support acts has nothing to do with bigger or smaller bands and artists - I''m a regular at one of Germany''s best festivals, the Hurricane, which besides the big guns has loads of newcomers or less popular acts on its bill every year - but at least there I can choose which bands I want to see and at which stage my interest is aimed next, or if I go to the beer stand when nothing good for me is on - at a ''normal'' show I can''t do that - as soon as I am there I have to endure what the record company wants me to hear and most of the times it is not what I want.Have I ever seen a support band (not a double bill) that had a decent career later? Not really [:P]Now go listen to Bowie''s back cataloge and you might just learn a thing or two.

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[quote user="Shyster"][quote user="John"][quote user="Shyster"][quote user="John"][quote user="Shyster"][quote user="John"][quote user="morty"][quote user="Shyster"][quote user="morty"][quote user="Herman "]

[quote user="Herb"]Bizarrely, Squeeze and the Clash today.Bit of a late 70s early 80s thing I have going on at the moment.[/quote]

Here you go.Squeeze live in 1982! Tonight on BBC4

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00v7xjd

 

[/quote]For me, the best lyricists / musical genius bands of the last 20 or 30 years are :-Morrissey / SmithsSqueezePaul Weller / The JamIan Dury[/quote]

And all four heavily influenced by Bowie - especially Morrissey and Weller.[/quote]Theres undiscovered tribes in darkest Africa that knew you''d bring Bowie into this [;)](Don''t worry, I rate him too, though he''s no Morrissey)[/quote]I''m going to take Morty''s side on this i''m afraid. Bowie is a great groundbreaking artist, the influence he commands in the music industry stretches out far and wide, and he''s very effectively derived the influence of many of the other great artists that preceded him into his own songs (so as to put it into context for Shyster that music didn''t start with David Bowie in case he ''may'' of thought otherwise [;)]).... But then of course, he''s no Morrissey.[/quote]

Yes, I realise music didn''t start with Bowie, John, but there''s no denying that he IS the most influential artist of all time.The sight and sound of Morrissey on stage almost caused my first ever walk out (or more accurately, drag out) of a Bowie concert - nothing against Morrissey myself, but it was my wife''s first big concert and it was a hard sell even to get her to go to something like that - her suspicions that it would be some musically inept egomaniac caterwauling over an abominable sound being more or less confirmed by Mozza, she looked at me menacingly and said "If Bowie''s not 100% better than that, we''re leaving, you cu*nt".Ever since then, she insisted we time our arrival so that we don''t have to endure support acts, and the sight of Morrissey is still enough to start her ranting.[/quote]1. Haha, no Shyster, David Bowie is not. He''s up there, but he''s not (i should reckon we''re simply going to have to agree to differ on this one, seeing as Bowie is quite obviously the be all and end all in your catalogue of music your in the know of).2. "her suspicions that it would be some musically inept egomaniac

caterwauling over an abominable sound being more or less confirmed by

Mozza" - Wow. Deary me, as a ''memory'' one would of thunk it to be just a little vivid. Unless she wrote that very description to you herself, in black and white, the depth of loathing repugnance in that statement could surely only be conveyed by the protagonist?3. Pardon the intrusion Shyster, but you''re wife has made one tragic decision in trying to avoid supporting acts because of one solitary disappointment, and i certainly hope this has no reflection on your good self. On so many occasions you can find the highlight of the night is the support act. My mother''s boyfriend for one has played in tons of bands in the past, and boasts a berth of knowledge about music of all genre''s i''ve never known anyone else to have, and because of it, the authority he speaks on the subject is matched by a very rare few. I should imagine your take on Bowie, and your wifes take on the ''deplorable'' idea of the "supporting act", makes you exactly the type of people that he, in all fairness, would want burnt at the stake. I''m genuinely sorry to say it, but it all stinks of being way too close minded in a subject that has so much to offer, that your wife, you, me, as well as most, if not all the world, know but only a tiny fraction about in the grand scheme of it all.One example out of the other few others thousands that escape my mind, is that of Arcade Fire as the supporting act to U2 in their 2006 Vertigo tour, and utterly dwarfed Bono and his ''disciples'' on stage. A band David Bowie has not only regularly performed with in the past few years, but has himself dubbed as the best band he''s heard since "YONKS!!!", and one of the many great bands you and your wife would miss out on because of a mere distasteful outing one night so many years ago.[/quote]

Oh well, that''s it then, end of debate - John''s mums'' boyfriend plays guitar in several second-rate bands making him an authority on all things music.[/quote]You haven''t quite caught the jist of what i was saying Shyster. It''s more that the impression you give to everyone on here when it comes to music is that your very close minded, and more stubborn in defending what you know than you are in expanding and diversifying your taste and knowledge of music. Thus you making such an enormously contentious and rather firmly put statement is bound to be attacked by many, especially considering that the ground on which you preach the greatness of Bowie is a very thin one, not only because of the brief and tenuous argument you put behind it, but your own ''unique'' approach to music as it is.

Anyway, it''s not just the fact he''s plyed his trade as a ''drummer and singer'' for plenty of bands that don''t field in the mainstream, but that his life revolves around music, and it always has. Records take up approximately 75% percent of the entire mass of our household, without even going into how many LP''s he has placed in storage, he goes to local gigs very regularly, performing or not, and he''s mixed with artists high and low, from The Ramones to The Damned, in the industry in his time. He decides no one''s taste but his own though, of course, but people with that kind of well versed understanding of the industry are those more apt to substantiate such a discussion, and i''d gander not one person of that ilk would dare make as bold a statement as you have, and they''d rather sensibly choose not to do so also.[/quote]

It''s because I''m a music fan that I can''t stand those c-class acts that are forced on me by the record companies when I go to see and hear an act of my choice - I''ve witnessed hundreds of gigs in my time, so I do actually know what I''m talking about here - how about your live experiences, Johnny boy?And before you draw the wrong conclusions again, my opinion towards support acts has nothing to do with bigger or smaller bands and artists - I''m a regular at one of Germany''s best festivals, the Hurricane, which besides the big guns has loads of newcomers or less popular acts on its bill every year - but at least there I can choose which bands I want to see and at which stage my interest is aimed next, or if I go to the beer stand when nothing good for me is on - at a ''normal'' show I can''t do that - as soon as I am there I have to endure what the record company wants me to hear and most of the times it is not what I want.Have I ever seen a support band (not a double bill) that had a decent career later? Not really [:P]Now go listen to Bowie''s back cataloge and you might just learn a thing or two.[/quote]I''ve seen Biffy Clyro supporting Muse twice........And I hate David Bowie.....And The Beatles.....What are the odds.....

[:S]

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[quote user="Unhinged Canary"][quote user="Shyster"][quote user="John"][quote user="Shyster"][quote user="John"][quote user="Shyster"][quote user="John"][quote user="morty"][quote user="Shyster"][quote user="morty"][quote user="Herman "]

[quote user="Herb"]Bizarrely, Squeeze and the Clash today.Bit of a late 70s early 80s thing I have going on at the moment.[/quote]

Here you go.Squeeze live in 1982! Tonight on BBC4

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00v7xjd

 

[/quote]For me, the best lyricists / musical genius bands of the last 20 or 30 years are :-Morrissey / SmithsSqueezePaul Weller / The JamIan Dury[/quote]

And all four heavily influenced by Bowie - especially Morrissey and Weller.[/quote]Theres undiscovered tribes in darkest Africa that knew you''d bring Bowie into this [;)](Don''t worry, I rate him too, though he''s no Morrissey)[/quote]I''m going to take Morty''s side on this i''m afraid. Bowie is a great groundbreaking artist, the influence he commands in the music industry stretches out far and wide, and he''s very effectively derived the influence of many of the other great artists that preceded him into his own songs (so as to put it into context for Shyster that music didn''t start with David Bowie in case he ''may'' of thought otherwise [;)]).... But then of course, he''s no Morrissey.[/quote]

Yes, I realise music didn''t start with Bowie, John, but there''s no denying that he IS the most influential artist of all time.The sight and sound of Morrissey on stage almost caused my first ever walk out (or more accurately, drag out) of a Bowie concert - nothing against Morrissey myself, but it was my wife''s first big concert and it was a hard sell even to get her to go to something like that - her suspicions that it would be some musically inept egomaniac caterwauling over an abominable sound being more or less confirmed by Mozza, she looked at me menacingly and said "If Bowie''s not 100% better than that, we''re leaving, you cu*nt".Ever since then, she insisted we time our arrival so that we don''t have to endure support acts, and the sight of Morrissey is still enough to start her ranting.[/quote]1. Haha, no Shyster, David Bowie is not. He''s up there, but he''s not (i should reckon we''re simply going to have to agree to differ on this one, seeing as Bowie is quite obviously the be all and end all in your catalogue of music your in the know of).2. "her suspicions that it would be some musically inept egomaniac

caterwauling over an abominable sound being more or less confirmed by

Mozza" - Wow. Deary me, as a ''memory'' one would of thunk it to be just a little vivid. Unless she wrote that very description to you herself, in black and white, the depth of loathing repugnance in that statement could surely only be conveyed by the protagonist?3. Pardon the intrusion Shyster, but you''re wife has made one tragic decision in trying to avoid supporting acts because of one solitary disappointment, and i certainly hope this has no reflection on your good self. On so many occasions you can find the highlight of the night is the support act. My mother''s boyfriend for one has played in tons of bands in the past, and boasts a berth of knowledge about music of all genre''s i''ve never known anyone else to have, and because of it, the authority he speaks on the subject is matched by a very rare few. I should imagine your take on Bowie, and your wifes take on the ''deplorable'' idea of the "supporting act", makes you exactly the type of people that he, in all fairness, would want burnt at the stake. I''m genuinely sorry to say it, but it all stinks of being way too close minded in a subject that has so much to offer, that your wife, you, me, as well as most, if not all the world, know but only a tiny fraction about in the grand scheme of it all.One example out of the other few others thousands that escape my mind, is that of Arcade Fire as the supporting act to U2 in their 2006 Vertigo tour, and utterly dwarfed Bono and his ''disciples'' on stage. A band David Bowie has not only regularly performed with in the past few years, but has himself dubbed as the best band he''s heard since "YONKS!!!", and one of the many great bands you and your wife would miss out on because of a mere distasteful outing one night so many years ago.[/quote]

Oh well, that''s it then, end of debate - John''s mums'' boyfriend plays guitar in several second-rate bands making him an authority on all things music.[/quote]You haven''t quite caught the jist of what i was saying Shyster. It''s more that the impression you give to everyone on here when it comes to music is that your very close minded, and more stubborn in defending what you know than you are in expanding and diversifying your taste and knowledge of music. Thus you making such an enormously contentious and rather firmly put statement is bound to be attacked by many, especially considering that the ground on which you preach the greatness of Bowie is a very thin one, not only because of the brief and tenuous argument you put behind it, but your own ''unique'' approach to music as it is.

Anyway, it''s not just the fact he''s plyed his trade as a ''drummer and singer'' for plenty of bands that don''t field in the mainstream, but that his life revolves around music, and it always has. Records take up approximately 75% percent of the entire mass of our household, without even going into how many LP''s he has placed in storage, he goes to local gigs very regularly, performing or not, and he''s mixed with artists high and low, from The Ramones to The Damned, in the industry in his time. He decides no one''s taste but his own though, of course, but people with that kind of well versed understanding of the industry are those more apt to substantiate such a discussion, and i''d gander not one person of that ilk would dare make as bold a statement as you have, and they''d rather sensibly choose not to do so also.[/quote]

It''s because I''m a music fan that I can''t stand those c-class acts that are forced on me by the record companies when I go to see and hear an act of my choice - I''ve witnessed hundreds of gigs in my time, so I do actually know what I''m talking about here - how about your live experiences, Johnny boy?And before you draw the wrong conclusions again, my opinion towards support acts has nothing to do with bigger or smaller bands and artists - I''m a regular at one of Germany''s best festivals, the Hurricane, which besides the big guns has loads of newcomers or less popular acts on its bill every year - but at least there I can choose which bands I want to see and at which stage my interest is aimed next, or if I go to the beer stand when nothing good for me is on - at a ''normal'' show I can''t do that - as soon as I am there I have to endure what the record company wants me to hear and most of the times it is not what I want.Have I ever seen a support band (not a double bill) that had a decent career later? Not really [:P]Now go listen to Bowie''s back cataloge and you might just learn a thing or two.[/quote]I''ve seen Biffy Clyro supporting Muse twice........And I hate David Bowie.....And The Beatles.....What are the odds.....

[:S][/quote]

The odds on your being a prize tw@t who offers nothing remotely interesting to any given debate are good enough to warrant my staking a property or two on.

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[quote user="Talk Show Host"]I''m only a photographer Herman! I get paid to meet my favourite bands and chat and take a few pictures of them. It''s a great life. I''ve only been here for about 4 months so I''ve had no one really of much note other than Klaxons. I mainly do the Radar section of the mag.[/quote]

I am actually quite envious.Here is that friend of a friends website.Some great photos of Download,Latitude etc.Unfortunately,they are whacking great jpegs,so the website is slow,just as a warning

http://www.jessicagilbert.co.uk/

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[quote user="SnakePit Lassy"]Not an album, but loving chase & status![/quote]

 

Funnily enough, they were one of the first groups I ever photographed for NME. Will was a nice guy, but Saul was quite rude and demanding. He seemed to think he could just stand there and great shots would come automatically, which unfortunately doesn''t quite happen.

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[quote user="Wings of a sparrow"]

Saw/heard this on MTV the other night and can''t get it out of my head. Be interested to hear what you think?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhYYd5adVY4

[/quote]

Hmmm,interesting and reasonably original.I like the guitar sound but i did struggle after a while.She''s quite hot though!

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[quote user="Talk Show Host"]The Kings of Leon album. Not very good, mind.[/quote]

Hopefully it''s not played to death like the last one!

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Thomas Dolby - the Golden Age of Wireless (collectors edition), great 80''s electronic music. Worth checking out if you like early Depeche Mode, Flock of Seagulls, OMD etc.

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I may have asked this before,but sod it:

TOM WAITS! I am intrigued by him.What album of his should i try first?I don''t want to jump in at the deep end and be overawed by his distinct vocal stylings.Cheers[Y]

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Tricky one Herman.,most of the time recently I play Mumfords in the car, but you have to have a little moment of the past.So as I have a cwt of "Long players" I still shed a tear for Gram Parsons and the tree. I play them ole LPs''s as often as I can,without boring guests.ce

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Listening to the new Girlssong ''Heartbreaker'', which is off their soon to be released EP ''Broken Dreams Club''.

If you haven''t already, listen to the first Girls album, which is titled ''Album''. My favourite album of 2009 behind The xx.

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[quote user="Herman "]

I may have asked this before,but sod it:

TOM WAITS! I am intrigued by him.What album of his should i try first?I don''t want to jump in at the deep end and be overawed by his distinct vocal stylings.Cheers[Y]

[/quote]

The thing with Tom Waits is that no matter which of his albums you start with there''s going to be some tracks that take a bit of getting used to. If you want something that''s got a bit of everything and will introduce you to the various styles you''ll get on your average Waits album then you may as well start with [url=http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rain_Dogs]Rain Dogs[/url] which is one of my favourites.

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[quote user="Herman "]

One for John and the new-folkies out there!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4QQ7HYYdWw

[/quote]Nicely spotted Herman, big fan of Johnny Flynn here. His album ''Been Listening'', of which includes that particular track, is in my opinion the pinnacle of this new wave of folk in London. Has a great ''Ennio Morricone'' tinge to it in some of the tracks, and his ingenuity concerning both his complex arrangements and, quite simply, his lyrics ("The Wrote & The Writ" from his first album ''A Larum'' is a masterpiece), is unmatched in this arena. Clearly a well educated fellow.There are some great lesser known artists like Jay Jay Pistolet and Andrew Davie (his old band Cherbourg were also a class act), but when it comes to the front-runners in this scene, he comprehensively dwarfs the artistry of ''Mumford & Sons'' and ''Noah and the Whale'', and even out-do''s Laura Marling''s frankly amazing initial foray into the industry with ''Alas, I Cannot Swim''.If you have as much as a remote interest in any of the musicians i''ve just mentioned, you couldn''t possibly go far wrong giving ''Been Listening'' a good go.

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Well it was a long time ago and a few livers have been replaced.I can''t forget Bert and John, as far as old music goes.I liked the movie youtube too. Gracious young people keep things going."Song to Woody" has me in tears.

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Mr C and John,glad you liked it.I heard it the other day on 6 and thought it was an oldie.First i had heard of Flynn so will check out his album[Y]

Cheers Shack,i will check out Rain Dogs as well.

I have checked on Spotify and both albums are on,so i will give them a blast tomorrow[Y]

 

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"Song to Woody"As I mentioned it was a long time ago. Youtube throws up some good stuff from the days of ''yore.If you look. .Most of which are repeated ,as were the original songs. Often from Anglia. in the Kentucky Hills.ce

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[quote user="ChristopherE"]"Song to Woody"
As I mentioned it was a long time ago. Youtube throws up some good stuff from the days of ''yore.
If you look. .Most of which are repeated ,as were the original songs. Often from Anglia. in the Kentucky Hills.
ce
[/quote]

Whose version should i look for?

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Bob Dylans first Album. ....."Here''s to Cisco and Leadbelly too and all the good people that travelled with you"The best and only version, worth a listen.I play the old ones a lot. Now they are on CD it is easier.ChristopherE

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The best is when in 1966 he is given a bad  start to the electric part .After a lot of booing including "Judas". He turns on the backing band,And after 3 footstomps shouts "play it fucking loud".... A classic version of " Like a Rolling Stone"ce

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