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Midlands Yellow

The American dream

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[quote user="VanWink"]But isn''t that the problem, "political correctness" means different things to different people. Trump took a stance of being irreverently anti "political correctness" in what he said and the way he behaved, a lot of his supporters'' experience of PC was maybe summed up as.........smug, entitled, elitist, privileged leftists jumping down the throats of ordinary people who aren''t up-to-date on the latest requirements of progressive society. That is how many people experience PC, particularly in the workplace, not surprising they kicked back.[/quote]

Rod Liddle article in the Spectator :

The deplorables are rather wonderful people, aren’t they? Both here and in the United States. The people’s revolution continues apace, defying the odds each time, defying the pollsters, defying the elite. I cannot tell you how pleasurable it was to scamper downstairs on Wednesday morning to check out the reaction on the Guardian’s website. It kept me cackling for hours. The previous morning the paper had concluded its fatuous leader column with the words: ‘Americans should summon a special level of seriousness and display a profound responsibility when they go to the polls.’ That alone had made me yearn for a Trump victory — the arrogant, chastising tone which liberals, especially European liberals, always adopt when dealing with commoners and plebs, the people who do not buy into their palpably failing and idiotic worldview.

That unintentionally hilarious sentence about a ‘special level of seriousness’ followed paragraph after paragraph of hyperbolic stupidity: Trump is a fascist racist who will devour your first-born and lead us all to Armageddon. This is the voice of that horrible tranche of self-righteous and authoritarian leftist opinion which petitioned to have Trump banned from entering the UK because he said things with which these imbeciles disagreed.

The reaction the next day when it became clear that the Americans had indeed gone to the polls with a special level of seriousness did not disappoint. Not just the shrieking readers, but the columnists, too. ‘This is a terrifying moment for America. Hold your loved ones close’, for example, from the reliably hilarious Stephen Thrasher. ‘People of colour, women, Muslims, queer people, the sick, immigrants: all are threatened by Donald Trump. They need your love, your warmth, your support.’ Oh, how we laughed.

My own preference for the US presidency was always going to be a bit of a long shot: a joint Ted Cruz/Bernie Sanders ticket. Redistribution of wealth, protectionism, a curb on immigration and the healing power of Lord Jesus Christ. That would have done me. But the Americans almost never do as I wish. I was for McGovern in 1972 but grew to like Nixon — and look what they did to him. I was for Mondale, Dukakis, Perot and McCain. In almost all those cases — perhaps the last aside — I was horribly wrong and the American voters right. The only one on which we accorded was Clinton in ’96. The other Clinton, the one with the cigar and the semen.

I was briefly for Obama in 2008 until the witless euphoria began to dissolve my brain and I switched at the last minute. The Mandela-fication of Obama — crass, patronising and misplaced — annoyed me more than McCain’s evident dimness and negative charisma. It is a bad thing to dislike a candidate simply because people you hate revere him, as was the case eight years ago. And scarcely better to prefer a candidate simply because people you hate hate him, as was the case this time around.

That being said, I found it hard to buy into the Trump camp’s mythologising, partly because I have a mistrust of self-made men who became self-made men as the consequence of a vast inheritance and partly because of his utter inability to construct a sentence which made anything approaching sense. And I was suspicious too of the vitriol and odium heaped upon Mrs Clinton, no less absolutist and hyperbolic in its tone. She may well be unlikeable, devious and part of a dynastic machine, but the insistence that she should be in prison struck me as a totalitarian impulse, as unpleasant as the counterclaim that Trump would press the little red button as soon as he got himself the nuke codes.

Such polarisation! Do you remember those days when political parties — here and in the States — yearned for ‘clear blue water’ between themselves and their rivals? For an ideological difference between our various elected elites, all of whom seemed to believe — à la Fukuyama — in the same thing? In the US and in Europe the lazy consensus that bound the leading parties together has all but evaporated. Now, from Budapest or Athens to San Francisco (via London and Warsaw), it is a case of populism of the left or right versus the vested interests. There’s plenty of clear blue water now. Be careful what you wish for.

I was for Trump in the end, by a whisker, by a wisp of his ridiculous hair, simply for pragmatic domestic reasons. Trump will be much, much better for Britain. I have never signed up to the notion of a special relationship: the US does whatever the hell it wants and if we’re on board, then so much the better, insofar as it matters a damn. But do not expect even the slenderest reciprocation in Suez or Grenada or the Falklands, or in attempting to extradite IRA terrorists. There is no reciprocation and never has been — perhaps (if you are American) rightly.

But it is also true that the Democratic party is, in general, far less mindful of British interests than the Republicans and, particularly, Donald Trump. Hillary Clinton has repeatedly said she wishes us to get around the table with Argentina to discuss the future of the Falklands. Why thank you, ma’am, for the offer — but no. It was the Democrats who insisted that we stay in the EU and then scolded us that we would be at the back of the queue for trade deals once we left. Trump was jubilant about Brexit and may well not know where Argentina is. The Democrats have their guns pointed towards nasty, homophobic Russia, while Trump knows well who are the true enemies of the West.

We stayed up with chilli dogs and pumpkin pie to watch the results. I like to imagine that in Boston and San Diego, Americans stay up on the night of our general elections with bangers and mash and Sussex pond pudding. That doesn’t happen, does it?

Anyway, don’t forget to hold your loved ones close. Priceless.

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[quote user="93vintage"]If you''re pro-war you should have supported Clinton. Yet we get the Guardian readers moaning about Trump''s sexism and racism as their main issue.I think many people have been brainwashed by the media into elevating political correctness above more important issues such as war.[/quote]of course those things are nothing other than political incorrectness to you because (I assume, apologies if wrong) you are a straight white man. You have no idea of the fear certain minority groups and communities feel now an open bigot has been elected president. Yes Hillary was also a terrible choice but I thinking you underestimate the division and hate this will cause all across the US

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I have female US friends rushing to get a copper coil implant as they are terrified trump will be renegging on contraceptions as he and mike pence have hinted at during their campaign. This is the kind of fear instilled in many non white men citizens now. Pence is the most terrifying aspect, if trump were to lose office and pence became president, he''d make the US as far right as possible. I can see certain benefits to Trump but pence is a disaster

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I would just like to point out to virtually all those commenting on the USA developments that you are not qualified to call yourselves SUPPORTERS or CUSTOMERS of either Trump or Clinton unless you actually live and/or pay taxes here. However, you are entirely qualified to call yourselves PLASTICS.

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[quote user="YankeeCanary"]
I would just like to point out to virtually all those commenting on the USA developments that you are not qualified to call yourselves SUPPORTERS or CUSTOMERS of either Trump or Clinton unless you actually live and/or pay taxes here. However, you are entirely qualified to call yourselves PLASTICS.
[/quote]I have been working in Alabama and paying taxes.And I think both Clinton and Trump are massive doodie heads.[:)]

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[quote user="morty"][quote user="YankeeCanary"]
I would just like to point out to virtually all those commenting on the USA developments that you are not qualified to call yourselves SUPPORTERS or CUSTOMERS of either Trump or Clinton unless you actually live and/or pay taxes here. However, you are entirely qualified to call yourselves PLASTICS.
[/quote]I have been working in Alabama and paying taxes.And I think both Clinton and Trump are massive doodie heads.[:)][/quote]Did you Pick-your-own Cotton?

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[quote user="YankeeCanary"]
I would just like to point out to virtually all those commenting on the USA developments that you are not qualified to call yourselves SUPPORTERS or CUSTOMERS of either Trump or Clinton unless you actually live and/or pay taxes here. However, you are entirely qualified to call yourselves PLASTICS.
[/quote]

If only we were just bystanders, but when Trump tears up the Paris agreement and continues to deny humans are causing climate change, installs an oil tycoon (Forrest Lucas) as head of the Interior, promotes authoritarianism, sexism and racism, and gives himself a diamond cutter whenever Putin speaks, then we are no longer just observers

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[quote user="ricardo"][quote user="morty"][quote user="YankeeCanary"]
I would just like to point out to virtually all those commenting on the USA developments that you are not qualified to call yourselves SUPPORTERS or CUSTOMERS of either Trump or Clinton unless you actually live and/or pay taxes here. However, you are entirely qualified to call yourselves PLASTICS.
[/quote]I have been working in Alabama and paying taxes.And I think both Clinton and Trump are massive doodie heads.[:)][/quote]Did you Pick-your-own Cotton?[/quote]They had some nice dark skinned gentlemen to do it for me[Y]

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ricardo wrote the following post at 11/11/2016 3:07 PM:

morty wrote:

YankeeCanary wrote:

I would just like to point out to virtually all those commenting on the USA developments that you are not qualified to call yourselves SUPPORTERS or CUSTOMERS of either Trump or Clinton unless you actually live and/or pay taxes here. However, you are entirely qualified to call yourselves PLASTICS.

I have been working in Alabama and paying taxes.

And I think both Clinton and Trump are massive doodie heads.

Smile [:)]

Did you Pick-your-own Cotton?

Do they have dwarf plants?

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http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-elections/hillary-clinton-president-donald-trump-electoral-college-voters-petition-a7412311.html

So technically it''s not all over yet. Imagine the uproar if the electoral college votes went contrary to the popular vote.

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God thats a piece of pish poor journalism! The Indy is better than that.

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It''d be civil war, nothing less.

Hillary is too busy asking Obama/Saudi princes for a presidential pardon before trump get in to claim the presidency.

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[quote user="Buh"]It''d be civil war, nothing less.

Hillary is too busy asking Obama/Saudi princes for a presidential pardon before trump get in to claim the presidency.[/quote]
At the moment there is nothing to pardon but let me tell you what decent people here in the USA feel conflicted about. We have all had it to the back teeth with past scandals and  impeachment with the Clinton''s and, so on the one hand, we don''t want to see another long saga consuming government time and money along with media frenzy chasing down the Clintons. We want our government to get on with the business of governing because there is a lot of work to be done. However, there are many that were and are disgusted with the foreign money contributions into the Clinton Foundation, particularly when Clinton held the position of Secretary of State. What we are concerned about is, if that is ignored, it makes it easier for that behaviour to be repeated in the future by others holding senior government positions. Some serious discussion will take place around that matter. 

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[quote user="Ron Manager"]God thats a piece of pish poor journalism! The Indy is better than that.[/quote]Shouldn''t the conclusion be that the Indy isn''t after all "better than that"? 

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[quote user="YankeeCanary"][quote user="Buh"]It''d be civil war, nothing less.

Hillary is too busy asking Obama/Saudi princes for a presidential pardon before trump get in to claim the presidency.[/quote]
At the moment there is nothing to pardon but let me tell you what decent people here in the USA feel conflicted about. We have all had it to the back teeth with past scandals and  impeachment with the Clinton''s and, so on the one hand, we don''t want to see another long saga consuming government time and money along with media frenzy chasing down the Clintons. We want our government to get on with the business of governing because there is a lot of work to be done. However, there are many that were and are disgusted with the foreign money contributions into the Clinton Foundation, particularly when Clinton held the position of Secretary of State. What we are concerned about is, if that is ignored, it makes it easier for that behaviour to be repeated in the future by others holding senior government positions. Some serious discussion will take place around that matter. 
[/quote]

Very informative contributions, Yankee. Thanks.

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@Purple Canary
You are being disingenuous. This is not about "ideas initially put forward by small groups of people that went against (even threatened to undermine) the established order, and so were fought tooth and nail, but now are now accepted  as obviously good." It is about the abuse of such ideas and the consequent erosion of other freedoms. It is such things as the inappropriate extension and over-zealous application of anti-discriminatory laws, the erection of "giving offence" into a heinous crime, and failing to provide protection against fanatics taking the law into their own hands, that people object to, together with the failure of those in government to maintain a proper balance between the interests of minorities and of those in the majority. 

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[quote user="Morisons Prozac"][quote user="93vintage"]If you''re pro-war you should have supported Clinton. Yet we get the Guardian readers moaning about Trump''s sexism and racism as their main issue.I think many people have been brainwashed by the media into elevating political correctness above more important issues such as war.[/quote]of course those things are nothing other than political incorrectness to you because (I assume, apologies if wrong) you are a straight white man. You have no idea of the fear certain minority groups and communities feel now an open bigot has been elected president. Yes Hillary was also a terrible choice but I thinking you underestimate the division and hate this will cause all across the US[/quote]Do citizens of countries in the middle east, central asia or africa count as minorities? The US war machine has killed or displaced hundreds of thousands of innocent people in the last 15 years alone, yet there''s a collective soul searching and hand wringing about a few politically incorrect comments and dubious policies (many of which probably won''t get implemented).I''m not saying Trump is perfect, and some of his policies obviously play up to xenophobia. But I can''t recall the same level of concern or indeed hysteria when eg Libya was invaded and subsequently destroyed, something that Clinton enthusiastically supported.The whole subject of Trump being racist, sexist etc has been whipped up and distorted by the media. In reality a rather large double standard is being applied.

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Lol that is hilarious

Generation snowflake burning running shoes

Then it''s straight back to not attending a university class they should be going to. "How to interpretive dance your way out of recession" or something

I was watching some reaction videos to trumps victory the other day and its hilarious. This people are so weak minded beating them almost looks like abuse.

Which is what it''s all about, perception of abuse.

Way I see it, and there appears to be plenty of evidence to back it up, America took a risky choice. Trump has many, many drawbacks but he''s not a bought and paid for career politician like Hillary. It''s blatant that her and her whole family are corrupt. The bribes from special interest and foreign powers. Just stinks.

What interests me most about Donald trump and what got him a lot of votes I''m sure is he doesn''t need to be president. He''s worth like 10 billion dollars. The guy should be in Florida playing golf! He CANT be bought. Some Saudi prince going to offer him 25 million dollars like Hillary? That''s pocket change to him!

Not a politician. But to have a leader that isn''t bought and paid for. Wow! That is something else! Just imagine if we could have that in the UK?

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[quote user="93vintage"]The whole subject of Trump being racist, sexist etc has been whipped up and distorted by the media. [/quote]

Yes, it has, but the problem is, he is seen as a winner and that - in the minds of those who are blatantly sexist/racist - will be seen as a vindication of their outdated and rather disgusting outlook.   And I''m not just talking about those in the US either.  The way women are still treated across the world in various cultures/countries is way beyind the pale - and Trump''s image and victory is a throw back for people with these attributes. Its a rather sad time for democracy and progress imo. Something good has to come of it. Somehow.

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All those celebrities that said "I''d trump wins I''m moving to Canada"

They never say they are moving to Mexico do they?

Racists.

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This point may have been made already elsewhere, but I did enjoy the delicious irony of the inmates of some American "reality" TV show being surprised and shocked - and generally not in a good way - by the election of "reality" star Trump.

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What''s annoyed me most is that new balance running shoes are really good. I''d highly recommend them.

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