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canarydan23

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Everything posted by canarydan23

  1. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    Wonder if you'd have lacked compassion if the chap was white? And also, no you stupid, moronic d!ckhead; try reading the article. You know less about Windrush as you do politics, which is already the square root of f**k all.
  2. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    I love that @Rock The Boat throws the term snowflake around more than anyone. He's the biggest snowflake of them all; the minute anyone hurts his feelings he is running off the Pete like a real big man, "Pete, Pete, Canarydan is being nasty to me again. Pwease, pwease ban him *sniff* *sob*". Pathetic.
  3. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    ""A compulsive liar who has betrayed every single person he has ever had dealings with: every woman who has ever loved him, every member of his family, every friend, every colleague, every employee, every constituent." Courtesy of Nick Boles, formed Tory MP and Minister. Will we be seeing him invited onto the BBC, LBC and Sky to eviscerate Johnson as Ian Austin was?
  4. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    The first election in which I was old enough to vote saw the election of Tony Blair, which makes me just middle-aged enough to remember this Britain arriving. Coffee not tea (and not instant coffee either); cities not towns; low-cost flights, not Butlins; multiculture not monoculture; Jamie Oliver, avocados, broadband, the restyled Mini Cooper; mass customisation; 50% of young people going to universities; everything done on a mountain of debt, especially that 50% graduate rate. If Thatcherism opened the country economically, Blair’s Britain did so culturally. This double “openness” is the heart of “cultural Remain”. BY THE SAME AUTHOR How motherhood put an end to my liberalism BY MARY HARRINGTON There are many desirable things about this “open” world and lifestyle. I am a big fan of avocados and European minibreaks, but even leaving aside these caricature “left behind” curmudgeons in the stagnant provinces, openness is a double-edged sword. One of its side effects has been a boom in the cost of living and, with it, a rising inequality (that began under Thatcher) and continued — particularly in the South — under Blair, only to get worse in the 2008 crash. Meanwhile, the boom in openness-promoting tertiary education produced not so much a boom in graduate jobs as inflation in the qualification levels required to do the jobs we already had. This has left many young people struggling to service a mountain of debt on salaries that are never likely to show much of the “graduate premium” they were promised. Today, thanks in part to the “open” economy whose values form the foundation of the “cultural Remain” identity, the cost of living — and especially home ownership — has rocketed. Simple aspirations that were within the reach of the working class in the 20th century are an unattainable dream today for millions of young people far higher up the sociocultural pile. And yet those young graduates have all, in the course of moving away to get their degree, absorbed the “open” value set now explicitly taught in tertiary education. The result is an Everywhere precariat, that has absorbed the values of a world that has little to offer it in terms of concrete benefits, and resolves this conflict by renting the heavily-subsidised and internet-enabled perks of a smarter lifestyle than it can afford to buy. Where once rentals might have just been housing and cars, today that can even include clothing. BY THE SAME AUTHOR Social mobility won't bring social justice BY MARY HARRINGTON The ferocious pro-EU rearguard action does not just represent the anger of an incumbent ruling class defending its perks. It also expresses the class anxieties of the lower echelons of those supposedly elite “open” classes, provisionally accepted as such via their graduate status, whose access to the perks of the open culture is at best precarious but whose cultural identity depends on it. “Cultural Remain” should be understood less as a reasoned-through position and more as a highly emotional proxy for a faltering but still enticing lifestyle promise. As well as a howl of rage by a middle class unused to being balked, it is a wail of terror from young people terrified at the prospect of falling through the ever-thinning economic ice that separates the slick, happy modern “us” from the miserable, stagnant “them”. It is in this context that we should understand Corbynism. Because the truth is that for many young people there is barely a fag paper between the urban twenty- and thirtysomething aspirational lifestyles rented via subscription services such as WeWork amid the coffee-shops and short-term rental markets of London, and those less fortunate ‘left-behind’ ones scraping by in the fulfilment hellscape of an Amazon depot. No savings, no spare time, certainly no capacity to make long-term plans or get married or have kids. The only difference is that one lot get to enjoy their rented lifestyle along with avocado on toast and a “connected fitness experience” instead of ready meals and sanctions for taking time off sick. Seen this way, one can understand better the totemic power of “freedom of movement”. You might not be able to afford to buy a house where you want to, but at least, says the optimism of youth, with freedom of movement we still have the limitless potential to try something new. To start afresh, somewhere else. Not to mention that same freedom means people with lifestyles even more precarious than our own can come here to staff coffee shops and warehouses, which reassures us we’ve got it better than them. That we’re still us. SUGGESTED READING How to make Britain One Nation again BY DAVID SKELTON But even that party may be drawing to an end. As Janan Ganesh recently noted, the days of the middle-class “world traveller” may be numbered. Graduate starting salaries in the UK are some of the lowest in northern Europe, especially in the creative sectors. Since the crash of 2008, wages for young people have been hit the hardest even as the burden of student debt rises. The cost of living is rising faster for those in rental accommodation than for homeowners, and with it the cost of those ancillary lifestyle services that console young Everywheres for the way twentieth-century aspirations have moved beyond their grasp. WeWork, Uber and Peloton all posted staggering losses in 2019; how long before the price of their services goes up under investor pressure on the bottom line? Even the price of avocados tripled between 2013 and 2018. The urban Everywhere precariat is heading for a crunch. They may have bought into the “open” cultural values disseminated by debt-fuelled universities. They may have flocked to London in search of a job in the media, and painted their faces blue to attend People’s Vote rallies. But millions of young Everywheres are on their way to realising they are not counted among the elite any more. That, in fact, they never were, except on a subscription basis — and even the cost of those subscriptions is slipping from their grasp. We can expect a political reckoning to follow. Ok boomer.
  5. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    "C4 News: Will you debate John McDonnell? Sajid Javid: It's always good to have a robust discussion and I am happy to discuss with John McDonnell at any time. C4 News: After that interview... Downing Street has said Sajid the Chancellor will not be debating Mr McDonnnell." We've got some brave people in charge haven't we. And their supporters cry snowflake at every opportunity whilst advocating voting for cowards.
  6. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    I blame the opposition MPs! But I'm not allocating blame. No sir.
  7. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    Cluck, cluck, cluck.
  8. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    So, about that bet?
  9. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    More evidence.
  10. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    Chickening out of the bet then are we Jools? As yellow as your hero, aren't you?
  11. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    Is that a yes to the bet, Jools? How many are you going to go for? I'll let you take 1+ if you want?
  12. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    Is that a no to the bet then?
  13. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    Fancy a wager on how many seats the Brexit Corporation will win?
  14. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    A humiliating climb down. Farage has been bent over the barrel, had his pants pulled down and let Johnson roger him without lube.
  15. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    Whereas Farage isn't even disguising his lack of a spine. Is that why you keyboard warriors love him so much? He validates your own lack of courage?
  16. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    Cluck, cluck, cluck!!!
  17. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    Remember the days when something like this would be considered satire, rather than a realistic commentary of politics today?
  18. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    Oh that's why is it? I just assumed it was because you feel like a bit of a bumbling wombat after your championing of Farage who turned out to be the biggest coward in politics and your waving the banner for a Halloween exit that never came to pass. But it hasn't got anything to do with you feeling a little foolish? Really?
  19. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    Is it that bad? Man, you must really hate whoever has been in power for most of the last decade then. Probably best that they're kicked out at the next election, yes?
  20. I've just seen this posted by Paul McVeigh on LinkedIn... "Fact: This is the game that saved my Norwich City Football Club career. Not many people know that Nigel Worthington had told me that “I didn’t have what it takes to be a Norwich city footballer” and that I was surplus to requirements and officially released me 3 days before this match against Watford FC on 27th January 2001. I was devastated and my career felt over before it had even begun. I was due to join Bury FC on trial the following Monday. Due to a number injuries in the squad, I was told to be on the bench to make up the numbers but amazingly with 22 minutes to go and 0-1 down Worthy told me to get ready to come on. So I entered the pitch and had, probably, the most impact that I’ve ever contributed coming off the bench and helped us to a 2-1 win in the dying seconds! 9 years later, 2 league titles, top scorer, a Championship play off final appearance, 300 games and 40 goals and a member of The Norwich City Hall of Fame probably goes to show that your life will be less impacted by about what other people think of you and much more about how strong your desire is to achieve your goal. Keep the faith, trust your process and never, ever let anyone tell you that you don’t have what it takes." https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6598518725081653249/ Not sure if the link will work, but the words accompany video highlights of the game. I didn't realise how close he was to leaving us. Everyone knew there was animosity between WLY and Worthington (I heard on good authority that McVeigh hosted a party that a few players attended after Worthy's sacking), didn't realise it emerged that early in his Norwich career.
  21. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    Their real economic policy? Or one that will cost you, a "business owner", a fortune?
  22. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    How would you know?!
  23. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    I could. I could also go looking for the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.
  24. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    Oh Ian. Oh Ian, Ian Ian...
  25. canarydan23

    The Brexit Party

    Shut up. Liar.
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